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Bobcat Arrow Of Light

Required Adventure

The Bobcat Adventure is the first required Adventure on your Trail and will get you and your patrol off to a great start. Once you have completed the Bobcat Adventure, you can work on the other Adventures in any order. In this Adventure, you’ll learn about things like the Scout slogan and the patrol method. You’ll find out about ranks in Scouts BSA and merit badges. And you’ll visit a Scouts BSA troop.

Requirements

Demonstrate the patrol method by choosing a patrol name and electing a patrol leader. Discuss the benefits of using the patrol method.
Patrol Elections
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts choose a patrol name and elect a patrol leader.

  • Slip of paper for each Cub Scout
  • Pencil or pen for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1.  Decide on the responsibilities the Arrow of Light patrol leader will assist you with regularly. Suggestions include:
    • Arrive early to help set up the meeting
    • Welcome everyone when they arrive at the  meeting
    • Lead in reciting the Scout Oath and the Scout Law
    • Carry the United States flag during the opening
    • Pick and lead a game for the to play during the meeting
    • Help hand out supplies for an activity
    • Stay after the meeting to help clean up
  2. Review the available patrol emblem patches at the Scout Shop. Select a few that would appeal to the youth in your den and make a list.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’ll be learning about the patrols and how they are used in a Scouts BSA troop. Tell Cub Scouts that a patrol is similar to a den in a Cub Scout pack but instead of an adult den leader, patrols have a youth leader. Tell Cub Scouts that patrols are managed by the patrol method. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in a small group outside the larger troop, working together as a team. Each patrol has a patrol leader and today they will elect a patrol leader.
  2. Share with Cub Scouts the list of responsibilities that the Arrow of Light patrol leader will be responsible for.  Note that Arrow of Light patrol leaders are to never be put in charge of other Scouts.  The Arrow of Light patrol leader is not the same as a Scouts BSA patrol leader. Ask Cub Scouts to raise their hands if they want to run for patrol leader. Give each candidate a minute or two to share with their den why they want to be the Arrow of Light patrol leader.
  3. Pass out a piece of paper and a pencil to each Cub Scout. Ask them to write down the name of the candidate they would like to be the Arrow of Light patrol leader. For a larger den, you may also choose to elect an Arrow of Light assistant patrol leader.
  4. Tally the votes and announce the patrol leader.
  5. Provide a list of possible patrol names to the newly elected Arrow leader. patrol leader. Ask the Arrow of Light patrol leader to lead a discussion about what patrol name Cub Scouts want to use.
  6. Have a vote to determine the Arrow of Light patrol name.

Tip: The Arrow of Light patrol leader is not in charge of the den. The den is led by a den leader

Get to know members of your patrol.
Beach Ball Questions
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts get to know each other using a beach ball.

  • Inflatable beach ball
  • Black marker

Before the meeting:

  1. Blow up the beach ball and write questions like these on it using a permanent marker.
    • Favorite ice cream flavor
    • Favorite sport
    • Favorite school subject
    • Favorite video game
    • Pet’s name
    • Superpower you wish you had
    • Favorite food
    • Birthday
    • Number of siblings

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to stand in a circle. Explain that you will toss the beach ball to one of them. When they catch the ball, they should answer the question that’s closest to their right thumb. After they answer the question, they will toss the ball to someone else.
  2. Toss the ball to the first Cub Scout.
  3. Have Cub Scouts continue to toss the ball to someone else until all Cub Scouts have answered two or three questions each.
Compliment Circle
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts share compliments about each other.

  • No supplies needed

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts sit in a circle with their legs stretched out in front of them.
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’re going to share something they like or admire about a fellow Cub Scout.
  3. Ask for a volunteer to go first. This person will call the name of another Cub Scout and give a compliment.
  4. The person who received the compliment will pull up their legs and  sit in crisscross applesauce style. They will then call out the name of another Cub Scout and compliment them.
  5. Continue until all Cub Scouts are sitting crisscross applesauce style.
Patrol Flag Arrow Of Light
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts create a patrol flag.

Patrol flags can be made from different materials and there are several different designs.  This is one example of a patrol flag that can be made  These instructions include a flagpole and stand.

  • 60” long  1 1/8” diameter wooden staff or dowel
  • 30” long  ½” diameter wooden dowel
  • Concrete mix
  • Water
  • Tin foil
  • 2-gallon paint bucket
  • 200 grit sandpaper
  • Various colors of felt
  • 1 Patrol  patch (Based on what the Scouts chose in requirement 1)
  • 30” piece of twine or thin rope
  • 1 teacup hook
  • Various colors of  Sharpie marker
  • Scissors, enough to share
  • Fabric glue
  • Protective cover for workspace, plastic tablecloths, newspapers, etc.
  • Fabric markers or paint
  • Yardstick

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather supplies.
  2. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to have room to work on their patrol flag and set out supplies.
  3. Wrap the bottom of the wooden staff with tin foil as high as the paint bucket is tall.
  4. Follow the directions for the concrete mix to fill the 2-gallon paint bucket ¾ of the way full.
  5. While the concrete is wet, place the wooden staff, the end with the tin foil, into the bucket and hold it in place until the concrete is dry.
  6. Once the concrete is dry, remove the wood staff the tin foil will allow the pole to come out.  This is the base for your den flag.
  7. Sand the ends of the wooden dowels and staff to remove sharp edges
  8. Lay the flag on a table so that it is vertical with the 2’ section as the bottom and top.
  9. Place the ½” dowel across the top and fold the top of the flag over by 1 inch to cover the wood dowel and glue the folded section to the flag to the back section of the flag with the wood dowel inside.
  10. Attach the teacup hook to the top of the flagpole.
  11. Attach the 30” twine or rope to each end of the dowel.
  12. Prepare the work area with table covering, flag material, and markers or paint.
  13. Cut out your den number from the yellow felt.

During the meeting:

  1. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be making a patrol flag. In a Scouts BSA troop, your patrol flag is your trademark. It shows your patrol name, emblem, Scouts BSA troop number, and the names of your members. As you win competitions, you can hang ribbons from it as reminders of your accomplishments.
  2. Allow Cub Scouts time to discuss the design of their flag. They may want to draw the flag using paper and pencil.
  3. Create the flag. Make sure it contains the patrol name and the names of each of the members of the patrol.
  4. When  the flag is finished, attach the flag to the flagpole by hanging it by the twin or rope onto the teacup hook.
  5. The Arrow of Light patrol flag can be displayed at meetings and outings.

Tip: Arrow of Light patrol flags can be made from different materials and there are several different designs.  This is one example of a flag that can be made.

Recite the Scout Oath and Scout Law with your patrol.
Recite The Oath And Law Arrow Of Light
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Learn and reinforce the Scout Oath and the Scout Law by reciting it with your patrol.

  • Arrow of Light handbook

During the meeting:

  1. Recite the Scout Oath and Scout Law from memory.
With your patrol create a Code of Conduct.
Patrol Code Of Conduct
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will be invested in their conduct when they help create their code of conduct.

  • 1 piece of posterboard
  • Markers
  • Optional den code of conduct poster from Scout Shop found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Read the following to understand the Den Code of Conduct:
    Positive behavior can be achieved by using many of the tools provided by Cub Scouting, such as

    • Having clear expectations of good behavior expressed to the Scouts and their families.
    • Developing a code of conduct with the Scouts in the den.
    • Using two-deep leadership, especially on trips and outings.
    • Having trained den chiefs assist with den activities.
    • Following the suggested Cub Scout den meeting structure outlined in BSA resources.
    • Using positive recognition of reinforcement aids such as conduct candles, marble jars, and stickers.USING DEN RULES: The den leader and the Scouts in the den should develop a den code of conduct. The subject of a den code of conduct, a set of group rules, can be introduced in an open discussion of how friends act toward one another. They will often contribute proposals that relate to safety, to respect for property, and to relationships with others.Put-downs and physical aggression should not be tolerated. The leader can make suggestions along these lines if the Scouts don’t bring them up. A few rules are enough for a start, but the Scouts might need to add others from time to time. They also might want to write out their den rules and sign on a line at the end of the list. This is a way of sharing with parents and guardians the expectations of their children.

      Although groups of Scouts of this age will have their good days and bad days, they are most likely to try to live up to rules that they helped set up for themselves. Scouts need to learn to judge their behavior in terms of more than conformity to rules. They need to learn about caring, too. Just as they can make up rules, they can decide on some of the caring values that they want to represent their den.

During the meeting:

  1. Using the Den Code of Conduct information above, help the Cub Scouts create their own Code of Conduct.
  2. Have Cub Scouts write the den Code of Conduct on a posterboard.

Tip: Save this Code of Conduct to have visible at future den meetings to remind Cub Scouts of the Code of Conduct they created.

Demonstrate the Scout sign, Scout salute and Scout handshake used by Scouts BSA. Show how each are used.
Scouts BSA Sign, Salute, And Handshake
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn the Scouts BSA sign, salute, and handshake and how each is used.

  • Six index cards
  • Pen or marker

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Scouts BSA sign, salute, and handshake.
    • Scouts BSA sign – raise your right arm to shoulder height with your elbow bent at a right angle. Cover the nail of your pinky with your thumb and hold the three middle fingers of your hand upward and together. Your thumb and little finger touching represent the bond Scouts have throughout the world. The three fingers stand for the three parts of the Scout Oath: duty to God and country, duty to others and duty to self.  Like the Cub Scout sign, when the sign is raised, it’s a silent reminder to follow the Scout Oath and the Scout Law by respectfully quieting down and listening. Nobody needs to yell, “Signs up!” The sign says it all.  From this point forward Arrow of Light Scouts give the Scouts BSA sign and not the Cub Scout sign.
    • Scouts BSA Salute – Form the Scout sign with your right hand, then finish the salute by bringing that hand up, palm down, until your forefinger touches the brim of your hat or the tip of your right eyebrow. The Scout salute is a form of greeting that also shows respect. Use it to salute the flag of the United States of America. You may also salute other Scouts and Scout leaders.
    • Scouts BSA Handshake – This is a regular handshake but done with the left hand instead of the right.   Learn more about this tradition by reading Aaron on Scouting blog “Why is the Scout handshake done with the left hand?”
  2. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to conduct a relay race.
  3. Write each of the following on two of the index cards so that you’ll have two sets of three cards each.
    • Scouts BSA Sign
    • Scouts BSA Salute
    • Scouts BSA Handshake

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that the sign, salute, and handshake for Scouts BSA is different than for Cub Scouts and today they will be learning a practicing.
  2. Give the Arrow of Light patrol leader the six cards and have them stand 60 feet from the starting line.
  3. Divide Cub Scouts into two teams and have them gather behind a starting line
  4. Tell Cub Scouts that when you say go, they will take turns running over to the Arrow of Light patrol leader. The Arrow of Light patrol leader will hold up one of the cards and Cub Scouts will demonstrate what is written on the card. After they have correctly demonstrated it, they will run back and tag the next person on their team.
  5. Continue playing the game until all Cub Scouts have had a turn.
  6. The team that finishes first will be the winner.

Scouts BSA Sign, Salute, and Handshake

Learn the Scouts BSA slogan and motto.
Scouts BSA Slogan & Motto
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts learn the Scouts BSA slogan and motto and how to use them.

  • No additional supplies

During the meeting:

  1. Share the Scouts BSA slogan “Do a Good Turn Daily” and the Scouts BSA motto “Be Prepared” with the Cub Scouts. Point out that the slogan and motto are different than the slogan and motto for Cub Scouts.
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’re going to play a game to help them memorize the Scouts BSA slogan and motto.
    • One Cub Scout will start the slogan by saying “do.” A second Cub Scout will take the second word “a.” Another Cub Scout picks up the next word. This continues until both the slogan and motto are said correctly.
    • Cub Scouts aren’t going in order; anyone can say the next word at any time. But if two or more people happen to speak at the same time, they must start the slogan and motto again from the beginning.
  3. Have Cub Scouts stand in a circle and begin the game.
  4. Keep track of how many times Cub Scouts can say the slogan and motto without starting over.
With your patrol, or with your parent/legal guardian, visit a Scouts BSA troop.
Scouts BSA Troop Daytime Activity
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts attend a daytime activity with a local Scouts BSA troop.

  • Activity Consent Form
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials
  • Any other supplies or equipment recommended by the troop

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local Scouts BSA troop to ask about participating in a daytime activity with the troop. The activity can be a hike, picnic, service project, or something similar.
  2. Find out what equipment other than the Cub Scout Six Essentials that Cub Scouts need to bring.
  3. Communicate the date, time, and location of the activity and the needed supplies/equipment to the Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians and remind them to bring the completed Activity Consent Form.
  4. Send the Aaron on Scouting blog “What questions should you ask when selecting a Scout troop?” to parents and legal guardians.

During the meeting:

  1. Immediately before the activity begins, gather Cub Scouts and encourage them to interact with Scouts BSA members while they are participating in the activity. Remind them that this is a good way to get to know the troop which will help them decide which troop to join when they cross over.
  2. Have Cub Scouts participate in the activity.

After the Scouts BSA meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and ask what they observed about the troop outing.
Scouts BSA Troop Meeting Scavenger Hunt
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time5

During a visit with a Scouts BSA troop, Cub Scouts look for key elements and experiences of the troop meeting.

  • Activity Consent Form
  • Paper, one for each Cub Scout
  • Pencil, one for each Cub Scout
  • Scouts BSA Troop Scavenger Hunt worksheet found in Additional Resources

Before the Cub Scout meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to be able to sit and write.

During the Cub Scout meeting:

  1. Pass out paper and pencils to each Cub Scout. Let them know that the patrol will be visiting a Scouts BSA troop.
  2. Ask them to write down questions they may have for the scouts in the troop.  If they need some help, provide some examples:
    • How often do you meet?
    • How many kids are in the troop?
    • Where is summer camp and can I go?
    • How do I earn merit badges?

Before the Scouts BSA meeting:

  1. Contact a local Scouts BSA troop to ask about attending a troop meeting.
  2. Communicate the date, time, and location of the troop meeting to the Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians and remind them to bring the completed Activity Consent Form and a pen or pencil.
  3. Send the Aaron on Scouting blog “What questions should you ask when selecting a Scout troop?” to parents and legal guardians.
  4. Print the Scouts BSA Troop Scavenger Hunt worksheet one for each Cub Scout.

During the Scouts BSA meeting:

  1. Immediately before the troop meeting begins, gather Cub Scouts and hand out the Scouts BSA Troop Scavenger Hunt worksheet. Ask them to mark off the different elements that they see during the meeting.
  2. Remind Cub Scouts to ask the older Scouts BSA members questions about their troop.

After the Scouts BSA meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and ask what they observed about the troop meeting. Ask them to share what they recorded on their scavenger hunt handout.

Scouts BSA Troop Scavenger Hunt worksheet

Scouts BSA Troop Overnight
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts attend an overnight activity with a local Scouts BSA troop.

Arrow of Light Cub Scouts may go camping as a den. They must abide by the Guide to Safe Scouting for Cub Scout overnight camping and have a BALOO trained leader,

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local Scouts BSA troop to ask about participating in an overnight activity with the troop. The activity can be a campout, lock in, or something similar.
  2. Find out what equipment other than the Cub Scout Six Essentials that Cub Scouts need to bring.
  3. Communicate the date, time, and location of the activity and the needed supplies/equipment to the Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians and remind them to bring the completed Activity Consent Form.
  4. Send the Aaron on Scouting blog “What questions should you ask when selecting a Scout troop?” to parents and legal guardians.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts participate in the overnight activity with the troop.

After the Scouts BSA meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and ask what they observed about the troop outing.

Aaron on Scouting blog, “Let’s discuss the BSA’s rule on registering all adults who participate in overnight activities.”

At home, with your parent or legal guardian do the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”
Child Abuse Protection Review Arrow Of Light
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Review the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”

  • “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide” booklet found in the front of the Arrow of Light Scout’s handbook.

At home:

  1. Parents or legal guardians must read the “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide” booklet and complete the exercises with their Arrow of Light Scout.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Review Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities before camping.

When camping:

  • Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO) training is mandatory for a pack overnighter. At least one registered adult leader who will be present during the overnighter must complete BALOO training.  BALOO training consists of an online pre-requisite component in addition to an overnight hands-on practical. BSA’s Cub Scout-level camping policies will be taught along with the discovery of the necessary tools to help units carry out a successful camping experience.   Check with your local council when the next available BALOO Training will be conducted.
  • Complete the online training “Hazardous Weather” training module that is part of the Position Specific Training for den leaders my.scouting.  If you have already completed den leader, Cubmaster, or pack committee chair training on-line, then you have completed this module.
  • Watch the Weather Related Safety Moment video (1 minute 48 seconds).
  • Review Guide to Safe Scouting for camping,
  • If building a campfire, review Behavior Around Campfires.

When camping with a Scouts BSA troop, Arrow of Light scouts abide by camping rules for Arrow of Light Scouts.

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