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Bobcat Wolf

Required Adventure

The Bobcat Adventure is the first required Adventure on the trail to earn the Wolf badge of rank. Once the Bobcat Adventure is completed, Wolves can start any other of the Adventures in any order.

Requirements

Get to know members of your den.
Den Doodle Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time4

A den doodle is a way to record advancement progress and other accomplishments of the Cub Scouts as well as a colorful decoration for the den meeting place.

  • Wooden display stand  
  • Craft foam sheets (some that are self-adhesive and some that are not) 
  • Rulers 
  • Pencils 
  • Permanent markers 
  • Scissors 
  • Heavy-duty tape such as duct tape 
  • Long piece of leather or plastic lacing for each Cub Scout 
  • Pony beads

Before the meeting: 

  1. Create a “name tag” for yourself to share with Cub Scouts in the appropriate size as an example. 
  2. Measure your name tag so that you will have the dimensions to share with Cub Scouts. 
  3. Tie a piece of string for each Cub Scout across the top of the display stand. 
  4. Write your den number at the top of the display stand. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be making a den doodle starting with creating “name tags” for themselves. Show the example you made and share the approximate dimensions. 
  2. Put the craft foam, scissors, and permanent markers on a table, and ask Cub Scouts to collect the supplies they would like to use to create their own name tag. 
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to cut shapes out of the non-adhesive craft foam to make their name tag. Cub Scouts can cut smaller shapes (such as stars or hearts) for the self-adhesive craft foam to adhere to their badge. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts write their names on the name tags using the permanent markers. 
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to attach their name tag to one of the strings by taping it with a small piece of duct tape. 
  6. The den doodle can be used to track advancement by adding plastic pony beads for completed Adventures. Use a different color bead for each Adventure. 

Tip: Den doodles can be made from different materials and there are several different designs.  This is one example of a den doodle that can be made.  

Den Flag Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Making a den flag together allows Cub Scouts to show their personality and creativity while they’re getting to know each other.

  • Protective cover for workspace (plastic tablecloths, newspapers, etc.) 
  • Blue felt approximately 24” x 18” 
  • Yellow felt to cut out handprints and den number 
  • Fabric markers or paint 
  • Fabric glue 
  • Yardstick 
  • Stapler 

Before the meeting 

  1. Prepare the work area with table covering, flag material, and markers or paint. 
  2. Cut out your den number from the yellow felt.  

 During the meeting 

  1. Have the Cub Scouts buddy up and trace each other’s hand on the yellow felt. Next, have each Cub Scout cut out their own handprint and write their name on it with a fabric marker. 
  2. Have the Cub Scouts arrange the handprints on the flag and attach them to the blue felt using fabric glue. 
  3. After the flag is finished, you can staple it to the yardstick. Display it at den or pack meetings. 

Tip: Den flags can be made from different materials and there are several different designs.  This is one example of a den flag that can be made.  

Get To Know You Bingo
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

“Get to Know You” bingo is a great icebreaker activity that can help members of a den get to know each other better in a fun and interactive way. 

  • Get to Know You Bingo card found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer  
  • Markers, pencils, or pens for each den member 
  • Prizes  

Before the meeting:  

  1. Download and print Get to Know You Bingo cards, one for each Cub Scout. 

 During the meeting: 

  1. As each Cub Scout arrives at the den meeting, give them a bingo card and a marker, pencil, or pen. 
  2. Instruct Cub Scouts to move around the meeting space and interact with each other to find another Cub Scouts who matches the description on a bingo square.  
  3. When they find someone who fits the description, the Cub Scouts signs or initials the corresponding square on the bingo card. 
  4. The goal is to complete a row, column, or diagonal of signed squares to get a bingo. Once a Cub Scout completes a bingo, they can call it out and share the fun facts about the people they interacted with to get their bingo. 
  5. Offer small prizes for the Cub Scouts who get a bingo. Prizes could be something simple like stickers or small treats. 
  6. After the game, you can yell out a block and have all Cub Scouts that match that item run to a certain point in the meeting space. This will help participants understand that many people share similar things. 

Tips: 

  • Encourage participants to engage in conversations beyond just getting a signature, so they have a chance to learn more about each other. 
  • Have some extra markers, pencils, or pens on hand in case someone loses theirs. 
  • Keep the atmosphere light and fun to create a comfortable environment for everyone to interact. 

Remember, the main goal of this activity is to help den members break the ice and learn more about their fellow members in an enjoyable way. It can be a fantastic way to start building a sense of community and friendship within the den. 

Get to Know You Bingo card

Recite the Scout Oath and the Scout Law with your den and den leader.
Recite The Oath And Law Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Learn and reinforce the Scout Oath and the Scout Law by reciting it with your den. 

  • Wolf handbook  

During the meeting: 

  1. Using the back cover of the Wolf handbook is the Scout Oath and the Scout Law, lead the den in reciting the Scout Oath and the Scout Law. 

Tip: Individual memorization is not the requirement. 

Learn about the Scout Law.
Scout Law Clothespin Quest
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Search for all the points of the Scout Law in this fun game using clothespins. 

  • 12 clothespins for each Cub Scout 
  • Baggie for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting 

  1. Write one point of the Scout Law on each clothespin.  
  2. Mix up the clothespins and put 12 in each baggie.  Make sure that none of the bags have a complete set.  

During the meeting 

  1. Give each Cub Scout their own bag of pins.  
  2. Each Cub Scout dumps their clothespins out of the bag then swaps pins with other Cub Scouts until they have a complete set. 
  3. The Cub Scouts can clip the 12 points of the Scout Law to their neckerchief, or they can simply put them in order. 
Scout Law Emoji Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will learn the Scout Law by playing the Scout Law emoji game. 

  • Scout Law Emojis found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer  
  • Envelope or baggie for each Cub Scout 
  • Wolf handbook 
  • Scout Life Emoji Scout Law 

Before the meeting 

  1. Read Scout Life article. 
  2. Print out the Scout Law emoji page–one page for every 2 Cub Scouts.  
  3. Cut the emojis apart and put one set into the envelope or baggie. 

During the meeting 

  1. Give each Cub Scout a set of emojis. Using the back of the Wolf handbook as a guide, ask the Cub Scouts to  match each emoji to the point of the Scout Law and lay them in order. 
  2. To make this game more interesting, you can make this a race to see who can complete it first. 
Scout Law Word Search
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time2

The points of the Scout Law are reinforced as the Cub Scouts search for them in this word search puzzle.

  • Scout Law Word Search found in Additional Resources
  • Printer  
  • Pencil or pen for each Cub Scouts 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print Scout Law Word Search, one per Cub Scout. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Pass out Scout Law Word Search h puzzle and a pencil or pen to each Cub Scout. 
  2. Have each Cub Scout find each point of the Scout Law in the puzzle. 

Scout Law Word Search

With your den create a den Code of Conduct.
Code Of Conduct Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will be invested in their own conduct when they help create their den code of conduct.

  • 1 piece of posterboard
  • Optional den Code of Conduct poster from Scout Shop found in Additional Resources
  • Markers

Before the meeting:

  1. Read the following to understand the den code of conduct:

Positive behavior can be achieved by using many of the tools provided by Cub Scouting, such as

    • Having clear expectations of good behavior expressed to the Scouts and their families.
    • Developing a code of conduct with the Scouts in the den.
    • Using two-deep leadership, especially on trips and outings.
    • Having trained den chiefs assist with den activities.
    • Following the suggested Cub Scout den meeting structure outlined in BSA resources.
    • Using positive recognition of reinforcement aids such as conduct candles, marble jars, and stickers.

USING DEN RULES: The den leader and the Scouts in the den should develop a den code of conduct. The subject of a den code of conduct, a set of group rules, can be introduced in an open discussion of how friends act toward one another. They will often contribute proposals that relate to safety, to respect for property, and to relationships with others.

Put-downs and physical aggression should not be tolerated. The leader can make suggestions along these lines if the Scouts don’t bring them up. A few rules are enough for a start, but the Scouts might need to add others from time to time. They also might want to write out their den rules and sign on a line at the end of the list. This is a way of sharing with parents and guardians the expectations of their children.

Although groups of Scouts of this age will have their good days and bad days, they are most likely to try to live up to rules that they helped set up for themselves. Scouts need to learn to judge their behavior in terms of more than conformity to rules. They need to learn about caring, too. Just as they can make up rules, they can decide on some of the caring values that they want to represent their den.

During the meeting:

  1. Using the den code of conduct information above, help the Cub Scouts create their own code of conduct.
  2. Have Cub Scouts write the den code of conduct on a posterboard.
Demonstrate the Cub Scout sign, Cub Scout salute and Cub Scout handshake. Show how each is used.
Bobcat Relay Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

In this Cub Scout relay game, teams show the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake.

  • At least two Cub Scouts 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide the den into two teams and have them line up at one end of the room. At the other end, station an adult or den chief for each team. 
  2. Have the first Cub Scout on each team run to the adult/den chief for their team. The adult or den chief asks the Cub Scout to demonstrate one of the following: 
    •  Cub Scout Sign 
    • Cub Scout Handshake 
    • Cub Scout Salute 
  3. If the Cub Scout can demonstrate properly, they run back to tag the next Cub Scout in line on their team.  
  4. If the Cub Scout can’t demonstrate properly, they run back to their team to get help then they return and demonstrate again. 

Cub Scout Sign, Salute, and Handshake

Scout Sign Sound Of Silence
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Practice the Cub Scout sign by playing the Scout Sign Sound of Silence game.

  • At least one Cub Scout 

During the meeting: 

  1. Tell the Cub Scouts to be as loud as they can, but when they see you show the Cub Scout sign, they should immediately stop making noise. Ask one of the other adults or den chief to time them to see how long it takes them to be quiet.  
  2. Then tell the Cub Scouts that you know they can beat that time, so you want them to be loud again. Repeat the process of showing the Cub Scout sign while having an adult time how long it takes for them to be quiet. 
  3. You can repeat this several times. 

Tip: When giving the Cub Scout sign, do it in silence. 

Simon Says Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Play Simon Says to learn the Cub Scout sign, handshake, and salute.

  • At least two Cub Scouts 

During the meeting: 

  1. The leader demonstrates the Cub Scout handshake, salute, and sign.    
  2. Cub Scouts will  demonstrate when the command is prefaced by “Simon Says.” 
  3. To make this activity more fun, include other options like: 
    • Jump like a rabbit 
    • Put your hand on your head 
    • Twirl in a circle 
    • Touch your toes 
    • Stick out your tongue
Share with your den, or family, a time when you demonstrated the Cub Scout motto “Do Your Best.”
Do Your Best Showcase
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts share a time when they did their best. 

  • At least two Cub Scouts 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to the Cub Scouts that you’ll be asking each of them to share about a time when they did their best. Share some examples with them such as: 
    • I did my best when my mom was teaching me how to fold clothes 
    • I did my best on my last spelling test 
    • I did my best when I was learning how to ride my bike  
  2. The leader should start by sharing a time when they did their best. 
  3. Go around to each Cub Scout that would like to share. 
At home, with your parent or legal guardian do the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”
Child Abuse Protection Review Wolf
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Review the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”

  • “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide” booklet found in the front of the Cub Scout’s handbook.

At home:

  1. Parents or legal guardians must read the “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide” booklet and complete the exercises with their Cub Scout.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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