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Computing Wolves

Elective Adventure

A computer is a machine that can be programmed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically.  Most electronic computers use a simple code based on an electronic switch being on or off, this is known as binary.  In this Adventure, get ready to see the inside of a computer and the main parts that make it work

Requirements

Discover the basic components of a computer.
Computer Components Fidget Spinner
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn about computer components with a fidget spinner.

  • Fidget Spinner Game found in Additional Resources
  • Cardstock
  • Printer
  • Fidget spinner

Before the meeting:

  1. Print 1 copy of the Fidget Spinner Game onto cardstock.  Cut out the fidget spinner game card.
  2. Attach fidget spinner to game card.
  3. Familiarize yourself with the internal components of the computer(s) you will be taking apart and their function. Identify the following parts:
    • Keyboard
    • Mouse
    • Monitor
    • Central processing unit (CPU)
    • Hard drive
    • Motherboard
    • Power supply
    • Random-access memory chip (RAM)

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts into a circle.
  2. Cub Scouts  take turns spinning the fidget spinner and guess the name of the computer component they landed on.

Fidget Spinner Game

Computer Matching Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play a computer matching game. 

  • Matching Game Cards found in Additional Resources 
  • Cardstock  
  • Printer  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print Matching Game Cards, one set for every two Cub Scouts. 
  2. Cut out the sets of cards. 
  3. Familiarize yourself with the internal components of the computer(s) you will be taking apart and their function.
    Identify the following parts:
      

    • Keyboard 
    • mouse 
    • Monitor 
    • Central processing unit (CPU) 
    • Hard drive 
    • Motherboard 
    • Power supply 
    • Random-access memory chip (RAM)

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide the den into groups of two to three Cub Scouts. 
  2. Hand out a deck of cards to each group. 
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to shuffle the cards and place them face-down on the floor or table in front of them. 
  4. The goal of the game is to find the word that matches the computer component picture. The first Cub Scout selects two cards and flips them over. If the picture on the card matches the name of the computer part, the Cub Scout keeps the pair of cards.  
  5. If the two cards do not match, the cards are returned to their starting place and flipped face-down. 
  6. Players take turns until all the cards have been matched and removed. 
  7. The game ends when all the cards are matched. 
  8. The player who matches the most pairs of cards wins the game. 

Matching Game Cards

Inside A Computer
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Take apart a computer. 

  • Computer that is ready for disposal – unplugged and battery removed. One for each Cub Scout is ideal 
  • Flathead screwdriver 
  • Phillips screwdriver 
  • Two small bowls to hold screws and small miscellaneous pieces 
  • Safety glasses for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting:

  1. Familiarize yourself with the internal components of the computer(s) you will be taking apart and their function. Identify the following parts:
    • Keyboard
    • Mouse
    • Monitor
    • Central processing unit (CPU)
    • Hard drive
    • Motherboard
    • Power supply
    • Random-access memory chip (RAM)
  2. Lay out the computer, tools, safety glasses, and bowls on a table.

During the meeting:

  1. Demonstrate how to use a screwdriver and which screwdriver is appropriate for each type of screw on the computer.
  2. Identify a Cub Scout to remove the first screw and place the screw in a bowl.
  3. Take turns allowing each Cub Scout the opportunity to take things off.
  4. Lead a group discussion of each component of the computer.

Tip: Visit an electronics recycling store to find PCs and laptops.

Determine how to properly dispose of computer components.
Visit Electronics Recycling Center
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time4

Visit an electronics recycling center and learn how they take apart items to recycle and reuse. 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Identify an electronics recycling center. 
  2. Contact the recycling center and set up a time for a den visit. 
  3. Confirm the name and information of a contact of the person at the recycling center.  
  4. Ask the contact to be prepared to discuss how computers are properly disposed of at their facility.  
  5. Send out an Activity Consent Form to all parents and legal guardians. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Visit the electronics recycling center. 
  2. Have contact give a tour and teach Cub Scouts how to dispose of computers properly.  If possible, allow Cub Scouts to do a hands-on activity to help with the disposal of a computer.  
  3. Encourage Cub Scouts to politely listen and ask questions. 
  4. Thank the host. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Send a thank you note to the recycling center.
Using a digital device application of your choice, create a story that you can share with others.
Digital Story Building
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time4

Use a computer-based program such as PowerPoint or Google Slides to create a digital story using pictures.

  • Paper 
  • Pencils, markers, and crayons 
  • Computer or smart device, preferably 1 for every 2 Cub Scouts 
  1. Set up meeting space with room for the Cub Scouts to gather in buddy groups and set up the computers or smart devices. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Ask the Cub Scouts to buddy up. 
  2. Give each buddy group 3 pieces of paper. 
  3. Each set of buddies is to create a story with pictures.  They can draw the story out on paper. 
  4. With an adult assigned to each set of buddies, Cub Scouts are to build their story on a computer or smart device. 
  5. Have Cub Scouts share their story with the den. 

Tip: There are several websites that provide help with building digital stories for free.

With your parent or legal guardian, set up a policy for safely using digital devices.
Digital Safety Pledge
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts create digital usage contract with their parent or legal guardian. 

  • Digital Safety Pledge found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer  
  • Pens or pencils 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print Digital Safety Pledge, one for each Cub Scout. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to sit down with their parent or legal guardian. 
  2. Hand out the Digital Safety Pledge to each Cub Scout. 
  3. Cub Scouts and adults review the Digital Safety Pledge together.  The Cub Scouts initials each line. 
  4. Cub Scouts then work with their parent or legal guardian to create at least one rule for each of the following areas
    • What devices are you allowed to use?  
    • What applications or programs are you allowed to use? 
    • What times are you allowed to use them?  
    • With whom are you allowed to communicate using your devices? 
  5. Both Cub Scout and adult sign. 

Digital Safety Pledge

Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before starting this Adventure, review Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activities. 

If you choose to take apart a computer, ensure that the computer is unplugged and the battery is removed to prevent any electrical discharge.

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