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Council Fire

Required Adventure

A real wolf pack works like a large family where everyone works together to keep the members of the pack safe, healthy, and happy. Working together is part of being a good citizen. In this Adventure, you will build a model community and become an active member in your community. 

Requirements

Learn how to properly care for and fold the United States flag. With your den or pack, participate in a flag ceremony.
Fold The Flag
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn how to properly fold the United States flag. 

Tip: If you don’t have a flag, you may be able to borrow one from your school, your pack, a local troop, your local library, or your fire department. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have the Cub Scouts buddy up.  
  2. Taking turns, each pair of Cub Scouts hold the flag at waist level between themselves. 
  3. Ask the Cub Scouts to fold the flag in half lengthwise, then fold it in half lengthwise again, always keeping the blue field on the outside.  
  4. While one Cub Scout holds the flag by the blue field, the other should make triangular folds from the opposite end until only the blue field is available. 
  5. Ask the Cub Scouts to continue folding in a triangular pattern until they reach the end of the flag. 
  6. Have the Cub Scouts tuck any excess fabric into the final fold to ensure a neat triangle. 
  7. The final folded flag should resemble a neatly folded triangle with only the blue field showing. 
Identify three points of the Scout Law that are important to being a good neighbor.
Scout Law In Song
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Compose a song about the three points of the Scout Law that are important to being a good neighbor. 

  • Paper 
  • Pencils and/or ink pens 
  • Eraser 

During the meeting: 

  1. Pass out paper and writing utensils to the Cub Scouts. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to pick three points of the Scout that are important to being a good neighbor. 
  3. Have Cub Scouts write a song about the points of the Scout Law that they have chosen. Ask the Cub Scouts to include why they’re important in the lyrics. 
  4. Have the Cub Scouts perform their songs for the den. 
Scout Skit Showcase
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Create and perform a skit demonstrating the three points of the Scout Law that are important to being a good neighbor. 

  • Three or more Cub Scouts 
  • Paper 
  • Pencils and/or ink pens 
  • Eraser 
  • Props and/or costumes 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Collect clothes and props that can be used in skits. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide Cub Scouts into small groups of three or four Cub Scouts. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts pick three points of the Scout Law that are important to being a good neighbor. 
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to brainstorm a skit that showcases situations or scenarios where these Scout Law points are demonstrated. Have Cub Scouts create characters and scenarios that align with these points. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to ensure that each person has a character to portray. 
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to pick out props and/or costumes for their skit. 
  6. Have Cub Scouts rehearse their skits with their teammates. 
  7. Have Cub Scouts perform their skits for the den or pack. 
Sketching The Scout Law
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Draw pictures that demonstrate the three points of the Scout Law that are important to being a good neighbor. 

  • Paper 
  • Pencils and/or ink pens 
  • Eraser 
  • Colored pencils and/or markers (optional) 

During the meeting: 

  1. Pass out paper and writing utensils to the Cub Scouts. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to pick three points of the Scout that are important to being a good neighbor. 
  3. Instruct the Cub Scouts to think about different scenes or scenarios that represent each of these Scout Law points. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts sketch each of their scenes on their paper. 
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to share their drawings with their den. 
Build a model of your home.
Building My Home With Cardboard
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Use household items to build a model of your home. 

  • Cardboard pieces or shoeboxes 
  • Scissors 
  • Markers, colored pencils, and/or crayons 
  • Paper 
  • Glue or glue sticks 
  • Photos of the Cub Scout’s home for reference 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Ask the Cub Scouts to bring photos of their home to the next den meeting. This can be a physical photo or on a phone or pad. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to the Cub Scouts that they’ll make a model of their homes using cardboard or shoeboxes. 
  2. Have the Cub Scouts look at the photos of their homes or think about them and talk about the parts of their house they want in the model. 
  3. Ask the Cub Scouts to draw a simple plan on paper to show how their model will look. 
  4. If using a shoebox, have the Cub Scouts take off the lid and use the box as the base. 
  5. Instruct the Cub Scouts to cut cardboard pieces for walls, roof, and other parts if using cardboard sheets. 
  6. Have the Cub Scouts attach walls to the base with glue to create the shape of their home. 
  7. Ask the Cub Scouts to cut outdoors, windows, and any special parts of their home from cardboard. 
  8. Have the Cub Scouts decorate their model using the markers, colored pencils, or crayons. 

Tip: Requirements 3, 4, and 5 can be done at the same meeting. The models built for requirements 3 and 4 will be used for requirement 5. 

Building My Home With Toys
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Use Lego®, Lincoln Logs®, and Tinker Toys® or other building toys to build a model of your home. 

  • Assorted building toys such as Lego®, Lincoln Logs®, or Tinker Toys® 
  • Photos of the Cub Scouts’ homes for reference 
  • Paper and pencils for planning 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to bring photos of their home to the next den meeting. This can be a physical photo or on a phone or pad. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to the Cub Scouts that they will be using building toys to create a model of their own homes. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts look at the photos of their homes or think about their home and talk briefly about the different parts of their houses they’d like to include in their models. 
  3. Cub Scouts can sketch their model on a piece of paper to plan it out if needed. 
  4. Distribute the building toys.  
  5. Encourage the Cub Scouts to start building by selecting blocks and pieces that resemble the different parts of their homes. For example, rectangular pieces for walls, flat pieces for roofs, and smaller pieces for details like windows and doors. 
  6. Cub Scouts can begin by building the main structure of their homes. For example, if Cub Scouts live in a two-story house, they can start by creating the lower floor before adding the upper floor. 
  7. Remind the Cub Scouts to be creative and use their imagination to adapt the building toys to match the unique features of their homes. 
  8. Once the basic structure is in place, the Cub Scouts can start adding details like windows, doors, chimneys, and any other distinctive features of their homes. 

Tip: Requirements 3, 4, and 5 can be done at the same meeting. The models built for requirements 3 and 4 will be used for requirement 5. 

Using the same materials from requirement 3, create a model of a building in your community.
Community Buildings
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Build a model of a building in your community. 

  • Use the same building materials used in requirement 3 to build the model community building. 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to bring photos of community buildings to the next den meeting or have some available to use. Community buildings include grocery stores, police and fire stations, schools, and places of worship. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’ll make a model of buildings in their community using toys or cardboard.  
  2. Instruct Cub Scouts to look at the photos of local buildings or think about them and talk about the parts of the building they want in their model. 
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to draw a simple plan on paper to show how their model will look. 
  4. Using the same materials and instructions from requirement 3, build a model of a building of a community building. 
  5. If using a shoebox: 
    • Have Cub Scouts take off the lid and use the box as the base. 
    • Instruct Cub Scouts to cut cardboard pieces for walls, roof, and other parts if using cardboard sheets. 
    • Have Cub Scouts attach walls to the base with glue to create the shape of their home. 
    • Ask Cub Scouts to cut out doors, windows, and any special parts of the building from cardboard. 
  6. If using toys: 
    • Encourage Cub Scouts to start building by selecting blocks and pieces that resemble the different parts of their homes. For example, rectangular pieces for walls, flat pieces for roofs, and smaller pieces for details like windows and doors. 
    • Cub Scouts can begin by building the main structure of their homes. For example, if Cub Scouts live in a two-story house, they can start by creating the lower floor before adding the upper floor. 
    • Remind Cub Scouts to be creative and use their imagination to adapt the building toys to match the unique features of their homes. 
    • Once the basic structure is in place, Cub Scouts can start adding details like windows, doors, chimneys, and any other distinctive features of their homes. 

Tip: Requirements 3, 4, and 5 can be done at the same meeting. The models built for requirements 3 and 4 will be used for requirement 5. 

Tip: Ask each Cub Scout to build a different community building.

Using the models built in requirements 3 and 4, create a neighborhood.
Building My Neighborhood
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Using the models that your den built, create a neighborhood. 

  • Homes and community buildings that Cub Scouts created for requirements 3 and 4 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have the Cub Scouts work together as a group for this activity. 
  2. Explain that they are going to create a neighborhood using the models of their homes and local buildings that they built for requirements 3 and 4. 
  3. Ask the Cub Scouts to arrange their models to form a neighborhood. 
  4. As Cub Scouts are making their neighborhood ask them these questions: 
    • Are there other buildings that could be added to the neighborhood?  If so, what would they be? 
    • Why did they place community buildings where they did? 
    • Why did they place homes where they did? 
    • What do you like about your real neighborhood or community? 
    • What do you think makes a neighborhood or community? 

Tip: Cub Scouts can create buildings in additional to their home and community building. 

Participate in a service project. Explain how your volunteering is helpful to your neighborhood.
Helping Our Four-Legged Friends
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time5

With your den, host a pet food drive to support a local pet shelter.

Before Meeting 1: 

  1. Pick a local animal shelter to support. Contact them to let them know about your pet food drive. 
  2. Decide on the date and duration for the pet food drive. 
  3. Set up a date to drop off the pet supplies with your Cub Scouts. 

During Meeting 1: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts create posters or flyers advertising the drive. 
  2. Hang up your flyers or posters around the neighborhood, at school, and in other places where people will see them. 
  3. With permission, set up collection boxes or bins in places where people can easily drop off donations, like schools, community centers, or local stores. 

Before Meeting 2: 

  1. Pick up donations from the collection boxes. 

During Meeting 2: 

  1. Have the Cub Scouts sort the donated pet food into bags or boxes. 
  2. With the Cub Scouts, deliver the food to the animal shelter. 
Scouting For Food Wolf
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Participate in your Council-sponsored Scouting for Food event. 

  • Activity Consent Form 
  • Collection bags provided by local council 
  • Vehicle to carry collected food such as a truck or van 
  • Map of area to distribute bags and collect food donations 
  • Check with local council for any additional items 

Before the Meeting: 

  1. Contact your local Council to participate in Scouting for Food collection event. 
  2. Review council provided materials for Scouting for Food event. 
  3. Communicate the details to the parents and legal guardians of your Cub Scouts. 
  4. Distribute Activity Consent Form to the den. 
  5. Confirm with local council the area to distribute bags and collect food donations. 
  6. Confirm with local council the location of drop off for donations. 
  7. Get collection bags provided by local council. 
  8. Communicate date, time, and location for bag distribution to the den. 
  9. Communicate date, time, and location for food collection distribution to the den. 
  10. Refer to your council provided resources for any additional items to be completed before the event. 

During collection bag distribution: 

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout. 
  2. Create buddies. 
  3. Assign area for buddies to distribute collection bags. 
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely as they distribute collection bags. 
  5. Remind Cub Scouts that it is illegal to place collection bags in or on mailboxes. 

During food donation collection: 

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout. 
  2. Create buddies. 
  3. Assign area for buddies to collect donations. 
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely if there is no donated food left out. 
  5. Take donated food to the assigned collection point. 
Toys For Tots Toy Drive
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time5

With your pack, organize a toy drive to support ”Toys for Tots” or another organization. 

  • Paper  
  • Markers, colored pencils, or crayons  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the Toys for Tots Host an Event page to find a local chapter. 
  2. Schedule Toys for Tots representation for an upcoming pack meeting. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have the Cub Scouts create posters or flyers advertising the drive to pass out at the pack meeting. 

During a pack meeting: 

  1. Cub Scouts greet the visiting Marine and introduce Marine to the pack. 
  2. Invite individual dens to come up and drop off toys with the Marine. 
  3. Help load toys into the Marine’s vehicle. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Send a thank you note to the Marine who visited. 

Tips: Make this a pack community service project for the month of December. All toys must be new in original packing.   

Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Watch this video about Service Projects in Cub Scouting (6:44)

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.) 

Before starting this Adventure complete the following: 

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist  to plan your den or pack service project. 
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects. 

During the Adventure 

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults. 
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.  
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines. 

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