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Count On Me – Lion

Elective Adventure

Suggest, “Discover basic geometric shapes and their use in arts and crafts.”

Requirements

Make a Lion using only squares, triangles, and circles.
Clay Lion
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Use craft clay to make a Lion using basic shapes.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 31
  • 3 oz. of air-dry clay for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Plastic knife, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 2” round cookie cutters, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Small rolling pins, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Toothpicks, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.
  2. Cover tabletops with plastic tablecloths to protect the table and make it easier to work with the clay.
  3. Using the instructions below, make a Lion out of air-dry clay to use as an example. Identify steps that may be a challenge for some Cub Scouts.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that shapes are all around us and if we look, we can see circles, squares, triangles, and other shapes in everyday objects like a car, a house, or even a tree.
  2. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that for this activity they will make a Lion out of clay but only use basic shapes.  Show the lion you made as an example.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners use page 31 of the Lion handbook as a guide to make the shapes they will use to make their lion.
    • First roll out the clay so it is flat and thin.
    • Use the 2” round cookie cutter to cut out a circle, this will be the lion’s mane.
    • Use the plastic knife to cut out the other shapes of the lion, when needed roll the clay back into a ball and roll it out flat again to make more shapes.  If the clay starts to harden too quickly add a small amount of water to the clay.
    • Once the pieces are all cut out assemble the lion by pinching the pieces together.
    • When assembled use the toothpick to draw the face of the Lion and add details.
Stencil Lion
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Use stencils of basic shapes to draw a lion.

  • Stencil of basic shapes, Geometry Shapes Plastic Drawing Template, one per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 8 ½ “ x 11 “ blank sheets of paper, 2 for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.
  2. Using the stencils, make a Lion using basic shapes to use as an example. Use page 31 of the Lion handbook for an example; however your example does not need to look exactly like what is in the book.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share with them that shapes are all around us and if we look, we can see circles, squares, triangles, and other shapes in everyday objects like a car, a house, or even a tree.
  2. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that for this activity they will make a Lion using stencils of basic shapes.  Show the lion you made as an example.
  3. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners use the stencils to make a drawing of a Lion. Have them color it, using crayons.
Triangles, Circles and Squares Oh My!
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cut out shapes and tape them together to make a lion.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 31
  • Youth scissors, a pair for each Cub Scout
  • 1 roll of Scotch tape
  • Thin tip black magic marker, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that shapes are all around us and if we look, we can see circles, squares, triangles, and other shapes in everyday objects like a car, a house, or even a tree.
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 31 of the Lion handbook.
Play a game with your Lion adult partner or den that is based on counting or numbers.
Hop to it Lion
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play a game of hopscotch

  • Sidewalk chalk
  • Small stone
  • Safety cones, to mark off area if playing in a driveway for parking lot
  • Hopscotch court found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with how to play hopscotch. Cub Scouts and adult partners take turns, standing in a line at the start/finish line.  Each player will go through the following steps:
    • Toss a stone in square one. Hop over the stone on the way out and pick it up on the way back.
    • If the player misses the toss, pass the stone to the next player in line and return to the back of the line.
    • Hop in the first empty hopscotch square. Balance on one foot in single squares and both feet in side-by-side squares.
    • If the player loses their balance or steps on a line, they return to the line.
    • On the way back to the start/finish line, pause at the square before the stone. Bend over and pick up the stone without moving their feet.
    • Once the player’s turn is complete, they pass the stone to the next player in line and goes to the end of the line.
    • After each player successfully completes a turn with the stone in square one, their next turn they toss the stone in square two, and so on until the player has completed all ten squares.
  2. Identify a location on a flat surface free of obstacles such as a sidewalk.  If using a parking lot or driveway place safety cones to block any potential vehicles from entering the area.
  3. Set up the hopscotch court. See diagram in Additional Resources

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that math is an important part of many games.  You may count the spaces you need to go, and the points you earn, or it may even be used to solve a problem to win the game.
  2. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that this activity will be playing a game of hopscotch.  Explain the rules of hopscotch.
  3. Have the den play hopscotch. As a player lands on a space they must call out the number on the space.

Hopscotch court diagram

Lion Dominos
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Play a game of dominos.

  • A set of double sixes dominos, you will need one set for every 8 Cub Scouts and adult partners in the den.
  • Notepad and paper to keep score

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the rules of dominos by watching this YouTube video, “How to Play Dominoes.”
  2. Set up the room so 2 to 8 players can play a game of dominos together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that math is an important part of many games.  You may count the spaces you need to go, and the points you earn, or it may even be used to solve a problem to win the game.
  2. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that this activity will be playing a game of dominos.  Explain the rules of dominos.
    • The dominos are placed face down on the table.
    • Each player takes one domino to see who will go first. The person who has the most dots on the domino they pick goes first. If someone picks a double, they automatically go first.  The players return the dominos to the pile and mix the pile.
    • Each player takes seven dominos to form their hand.
    • Players should not show their dominos to the other players.
    • The person that goes first lays down a domino from their hand.
    • The person on their left goes next.  They must match the number of dots on the end of their domino with one end of the domino that was placed by the first player.  If they do not have a domino that matches, they must draw one domino from the pile of excess dominos.  If the domino they picked can be played they can play it, it is then the next player’s turn.  If the domino they picked cannot be played it is then the next player’s turn.
    • Play continues until one person has played all the dominos in their hand.
    • If someone cannot play a domino from their hand and there are no more excess dominos to pick, they pass their turn to the next player.
    • When a player has played all the dominos in their hand the dots are counted on the dominos that are in the other player’s hands and those points are awarded to the player who played all their dominos.
    • You can continue to play rounds until someone reaches 100 points or an established time.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners split into teams to play.
  4. Have everyone play dominos keeping in mind the points of the Scout Law and good sportsmanship.
Lions, Dimes, Nickles, and Pennies
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts count change in this relay game.

  • 10 pennies
  • 10 nickels
  • 10 dimes
  • 5 quarters
  • Small bowl
  • Stopwatch
  • 2 sports cones

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a safe location free of obstacles to run a relay race.
  2. Set up sports cones 10 yards apart.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that math is an important part of many games.  You may count the spaces you need to go, and the points you earn, or it may even be used to solve a problem to win the game.
  2. Share with the den that in order to do well in this activity they will need to know how to count change.
  3. Show each coin and tell the Cub Scouts the value of each coin:
    • Penny = 1
    • Nicke = 5
    • Dime = 10
    • Quarter = 25
  4. Take a random selection of coins and practice having Cub Scouts count the change.  Give them enough time to practice before running the relay race.
  5. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that this activity will run a relay race.
  6. Explain the rules of the relay race.
    • The den will be divided into two teams.  They will compete to see what team can complete the relay in the fastest time.
    • The first team lines up behind a cone.  The game leader stands at the other cone.
    • The game leader places some coins in the small bowl.
    • The first player on the team on the signal and at the start of the stopwatch runs to the game leader.
    • When the player arrives, they look in the bowl and count the change, if they get it correct, they return to their team and the next player goes.  If they get it incorrect, they must run back to the other cone and run back.  The team leader does not change the coins.  The player continues until they get it correct.
    • Play continues until ever player on a team has run the relay.
    • When the last player on the team finishes the stopwatch stops and the time is given for the team.
    • The next team tries to beat that time.  If you have an odd number of den members, have someone play on both teams.
Organize a group of items based on shape, then based on color, and one other category.  Count how many different shapes are in each category.  After organizing them build anything using only one category.
Count the Shapes in My Face
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Identify the different shapes and count them in the Lion face.

  • Lions will need their Lion handbook, page 30
  • Crayons , assorted colors enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them complete the activity together on page 30 of the Lion handbook.   When they are done have them color the lion’s face.
Modular Building Blocks
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time1

Use modular building blocks to sort and build.

  • LEGO blocks of various sizes, shapes, and colors

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share with them that in this activity they are going to sort LEGO building blocks and then have a building challenge.
  2. Give each Cub Scout a small pile of LEGO building blocks and give them instructions to sort the LEGO building blocks first by color.  Have them share how many of each color they had in their pile.
  3. When everyone has sorted by color have them put the LEGO building blocks back in the pile and have them sort by shape.  Common shapes would be square, rectangle, triangle, and circle.  Have them share how many of each shape they had in their pile.
  4. When everyone has sorted by shape have them put the LEGO building blocks back in the pile and have them sort the bricks by height. One pile are the flat pieces, the second pile are the traditional brick size.  Have them share how many of each they had in their pile.
  5. Have everyone combine their piles of LEGO building blocks into one large pile.  Assign a different color to each Cub Scout based on the color of LEGO building blocks that are in the pile.  Have Cub Scouts build a house only using the color they were assigned.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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