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Cubs Who Care

Elective Adventure

Scouts understand just how many things people with disabilities are able to do. You will discover some challenges people with disabilities face, and you will have the chance to try facing similar challenges yourself.  A single activity can’t show you everything about life with a disability, but it can help you understand a little more about the ways a person with a disability is able to do things. 

Requirements

Explore what it is to have a physical disability.
Chair Ball
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts shoot baskets from a sitting position.  

  • Chairs 
  • Rubber ball, basketball size 
  • Basketball hoop or large basket  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Set up the meeting space in a large open area. 
  2. If using a basketball hoop, set the hoop height to 6 to 7 feet.  If using a basket, place on top of something that is approximately 6 to 7 feet in height.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a physical disability.  Examples of physical disabilities are people in wheelchairs because their legs do not work. Because of the physical disability, doing simple tasks may be difficult. 
  2. Tell Cub Scouts they are going to try to shoot baskets from a chair to help them understand physical disabilities.  
  3. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’ll play a game of “CUBS” while sitting in a chair.  
  4. Line up Cub Scouts. 
  5. Set up a chair from which Cub Scouts will sit and shoot the ball into the basket.   
  6. If a Cub Scout makes the shot, they are awarded a letter in “CUBS.”  
  7. Each time a Cub Scout makes a shot, they are awarded a letter. 
  8. Once all Cub Scouts have had a chance from the first location, move the chair to another location and have all Cub Scouts shoot the ball into the basket from the new location. 
  9. Continue until someone has completed spelling CUBS. 
Draw A Picture
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will use tongs to draw a picture of their family. 

  • Kitchen tongs for each Cub Scout 
  • Crayons or markers 
  • Paper 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a physical disability.  Examples of physical disabilities are people in wheelchairs because their legs do not work, or someone may be missing an arm.  Because of a physical disability, doing simple tasks may be difficult. 
  2. Tell Cub Scouts they are going to try to draw a picture of their family with tongs to help them understand physical disabilities.  
  3. Hand out tongs, crayons or markers, and paper to Cub Scouts. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts use the tongs to draw a picture of their family.  
  5. When Cub Scouts are finished, ask them the following questions: 
    • Was it hard to draw a picture? 
    • What other things would be hard if we couldn’t use our hands properly? 
Mitten Hands
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts wear oversized gloves to complete simple tasks.

  • Large gloves or mittens, winter gloves, work gloves, or oven mitts, 1 pair per Cub Scout 
  • Coins 
  • Crayons 
  • Paper 
  • Paracord or string 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Collect supplies. 
  2. Spread coins, crayons, paper, and paracord on a tabletop. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Hand out gloves to Cub Scouts and ask them to put them on. 
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a physical disability.  Examples of physical disabilities are people in wheelchairs because their legs do not work, or someone may be missing an arm.  Because of the physical disability, doing simple tasks may be difficult. 
  3. Tell Cub Scouts they are going to try to do some simple tasks while wearing gloves or mittens to help them understand physical disabilities.  
  4. Have Cub Scouts take turns doing the following activities with their gloves or mittens on: 
    • Pick up coins 
    • Color a picture with the crayons and paper 
    • Tie a knot with the paracord 
  5. After Cub Scouts have finished, ask them how they felt while trying to pick up the coins, color a picture and tying a knot while wearing gloves.
Explore what it is to have a visual impairment.
Masked Artist
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts draw a picture then try to draw it again with their eyes covered.

  • Crayons, colored pencils, or markers 
  • Paper, two sheets for each Cub Scout 
  • Eye covering, one set for each buddy group

Before the meeting: 

  1. Set up the meeting table with an area for Cub Scouts to draw. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Provide each Cub Scout with two sheets of paper and crayons. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to draw a picture of their home. 
  3. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a visual disability; they may have trouble seeing or may not be able to see at all.  Ask Cub Scouts what they would do if they were drawing a picture and could not see what they were drawing. 
    • How would they decide the color to use when drawing if they could not see the color? 
    • How would they know how big to draw their home? 
    • How would they know where to put the front door? 
    • How would they know when they reached the edge of the paper? 
    • How would they know if the shape they draw is the shape of their house? 
  4. Have Cub Scouts buddy up. Provide eye covering to each buddy group. Ask for one buddy to be first to cover their eyes. 
  5. Have Cub Scout with their eyes covered draw the same picture of their home. The buddy may provide advice or guidance when drawing when asked. 
  6. Once Cub Scout with their eyes covered is done, have Cub Scouts switch. 
  7. Ask the Cub Scouts to compare the 2 drawings.
     

    • How are the drawings the same? 
    • How are the drawings different? 
    • Which drawing was easier? 
    • How did your buddy help you? 
Service Dog Visit
LocationOutdoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts learn about service dogs.  

  • Service dog with handler 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Find a local group of service dog handlers for the visually impaired. 
  2. Invite the handler and service dog to an upcoming den meeting.  
  3. Let the families know that a handler and service dog will be attending the meeting. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to come up with questions to ask the handler. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a visual disability, they may have trouble seeing or may not be able to see at all.  
  2. Tell Cub Scouts that some visually impaired people have service dogs to help them.  
  3. Ask handlers to share how service dogs help people that are visually impaired. 
  4. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions about service dogs. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Write a thank you note to the service dog handler.
Where Is The Ball?
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts toss a Nerf™ ball back and forth learning depth perception.

  • Nerf™ ball, 1 for every 2 Cub Scouts 
  •  Eye patch for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Set up meeting space with enough room for Cub Scouts to toss the ball back and forth between buddies. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a visual disability; they may have trouble seeing or may not be able to see at all.   
  2. Have Cub Scouts line up and look into the distance at an object.  Ask them to share what they see. 
  3. Have Cub Scouts cover their right eye.  Did the object move or did it remain in the same place? 
  4. Do the same covering the left eye. Did the object move or did it remain in the same place? 
  5. Have Cub Scouts buddy up. Give each set of buddies a ball.  
  6. Have Cub Scouts toss the ball back and forth 10 times. 
  7. Hand out eye patches and ask Cub Scout to cover up their right eye. 
  8. Have Cub Scouts stand 5 feet apart and throw the Nerf™ ball back and forth 10 times. 
  9. Stop and ask Cub Scouts“Was it the same, easier, or harder to catch the Nerf™ ball. 
  10. Repeat the exercise with the left eye covered.  How was this different than when the right eye was covered? 
Explore what it is to have a hearing loss.
“Hello, My Name Is”
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Use American Sign Language to communicate a simple sentence that includes your name. 

  • American Sign Language Alphabet worksheet found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print one copy of American Sign Language Alphabet worksheet for each Cub Scout. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a hearing loss; they may have trouble hearing or may not be able to hear at all.  Another method of communicating is by using sign language. 
  2. Have the Cub Scouts buddy up. 
  3. Give each Cub Scout a copy of the American Sign Language Alphabet worksheet. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to practice signing “Hello, my name is” and their name to their buddy. 

American Sign Language Alphabet worksheet

Scout Law
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts try to speak to their buddy with a mouthful of marshmallows. 

  • Bag of large marshmallows 
  • Large bowl 
  • Scout Law cards found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print and cut out Scout Law cards. 
  2. Fold the cards and place them in a large bowl. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Sit Cub Scouts in a circle.   
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a hearing loss; they may have trouble hearing or may not be able to hear at all.  It is difficult to speak clearly when you are unable to hear clearly. Ask Cub Scouts how they would learn to talk if they could not hear. 
  3. Give one Cub Scout enough marshmallows to fill their mouth, 4 to 6.  Ask them to draw a card from the bowl. 
  4. Ask Cub Scout to put the marshmallows in their mouth and read the Scout Law on the card. (You may help those who have difficulty reading.) 
  5. The other Cub Scouts try to guess what is being said. 
  6. Repeat for each Cub Scout. 
  7. Ask Cub Scouts the following:

    • Did you understand what Cub Scouts were saying when they had marshmallows in their mouths? 
    • How would you make the message clearer? 
    • What would be another way to communicate?
    • Scout Law cards 
Tele-What?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts play “telephone” while ears are covered.

  • Ear coverings, one set per Cub Scout 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a hearing loss; they may have trouble hearing or may not be able to hear at all.  Ask Cub Scouts how they would talk on the phone if they could not hear. 
  2. Tell Cub Scouts they’re going to play the “telephone game.” The game is to whisper a message from one person to another, with the goal of seeing how much the message changes as it gets passed along.  
  3. Have Cub Scouts sit in a circle. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to put on their ear coverings. 
  5. Give the first Cub Scout a message. It’s most fun if it’s a bit quirky like “purple elephants dance on the moon.” 
  6. Have the first Cub Scout whisper it to the person on their right. Make sure it’s quiet enough so that others can’t hear. The message should only be whispered once. 
  7. Tell Cub Scout who received the message to whisper it to the person on their right, and this continues around the circle. Each person should only whisper the message they heard to the person next to them. 
  8. Tell Cub Scouts they should not repeat the message if asked, nor should they clarify or ask for repetitions if they didn’t hear it correctly. They must do their best to pass on the message as they understood it. 
  9. After the message has been whispered around the entire circle, the last Cub Scout in the group announces what they heard to the entire group. 
  10. Questions to ask:
     

    • Did the message change? 
    • Was it hard to hear the message being whispered? 
    • How would you make the message clearer? 
    • What would be another way to communicate the message without speaking louder? 
Explore barriers to getting around.
Accessibility Walk Around
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts will take a walk around your meeting space to identify accommodations and lack of accommodations for people with disabilities.  

  • No supplies needed 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a physical disability.  Examples of physical disabilities are people in wheelchairs because their legs do not work. Because of a physical disability, it is difficult to get around. This is especially true if a building’s design isn’t accessible. 
  2. Take Cub Scouts on a walk around their meeting space to discuss disability accommodations. Start in the parking lot.  
  3. Ask Cub Scouts the following questions:
     

    • Are there specific handicap parking spots? 
    • Can you find any doors that have automatic openers? 
    • Do you think a wheelchair could get into the building? What would prevent this?  
    • Are there stairs you need to walk up to get into the building? If so, are there ramps or elevators that would help? 
    • Are the doorways wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair? 
    • What do the thresholds look like? Are they raised? Can a wheelchair roll over them easily? 
    • Are the bathroom doors wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair? Are there handicap accessible stalls that are big enough for a wheelchair? 
    • Are there other things about your meeting space that would make it difficult for someone in a wheelchair to get around? 
Out Of Reach
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts sit on chairs to explore barriers to getting around.  

  • Chairs 
  • Pencils 
  • Scissors 
  • Wolf handbook 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Place the scissors on one side of a table. Put two or three chairs on the opposite side of the table. 
  2. Place the pencils on the floor near a wall where they won’t be stepped on. Put a chair next to them. 
  3. Place the Wolf handbook on a wall shelf. Put a chair below and facing the shelf. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that some people have a physical disability.  Examples of physical disabilities are people in wheelchairs because their legs do not work. Because of the physical disability, it is difficult to get around and to retrieve items they may need. 
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that they are going to sit in a chair and try to reach various objects they may need. 
  3. Have Cub Scouts take turns sitting in one of the chairs at the table. Ask them to pick up a pair of scissors without standing or rising up out of the chair. 
  4. Next, have Cub Scouts take turns sitting in the chair by the pencils. Ask them to pick up a pencil off the floor without moving off the chair. 
  5. Have Cub Scouts take turns sitting in the chair by the shelf. Ask them to retrieve the Wolf handbook off the shelf without standing or raising up out of the chair. 
  6. When Cub Scouts have tried all the tasks, have them sit in chairs and then ask the following questions: 
    • Was it hard to reach the items sitting down? 
    • Look around the room. What other things would be hard to retrieve if you must stay seated? 
    • What can we do to make it easier to reach the things we need?
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are to be considered or followed for the Adventure.

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