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Fellowship

Required Adventure

It is important to know that the BSA has a religious element as a part of the program as stated in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. However, the BSA is absolutely nonsectarian in its attitude toward a member’s religion or faith. The BSA policy is that the home and organization or group with which the member is connected shall give definite attention to religious life.

In this Adventure, you’re encouraged to learn more about your family’s faith traditions. You will complete most of these requirements at home with your family. Faith means having complete trust or confidence in someone or something. Always be respectful when talking about your faith and when learning about other faiths.

This Adventure is commonly done at home with the Cub Scout’s family. If it is being done as a den, ensure that every parent and guardian is aware of the content and the activities that the den will do and allow for parents to opt out of doing it as a den activity and choose to complete the requirement at home.

Requirements

Family & Reverence Adventure This Adventure may be earned by completing the requirements below OR by completing a Religious Emblem of the Cub Scouts family’s choosing.
With your parent or legal guardian talk about your family’s faith traditions. Identify three holidays or celebrations that are part of your family’s faith traditions. Make a craft, work of art, or a food item that is part of your favorite family’s faith tradition, holiday or celebration.
Beary Happy Turkey Treats
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Create Thanksgiving treats.

Thanksgiving is an American tradition and celebration that has a foundation for religious freedom.  These instructions are for each Cub Scout to make 3 Thanksgiving treats.  You may consider having Cub Scouts bring a food item to a den meeting that they made with their family that is typically eaten as part of a family faith tradition.

  • Oven
  • Sink and hand soap
  • 13” x 9” Cookie sheet,  one for every  four Cub Scouts
  • 13” x 9” Parchment paper, one for each cookie sheet
  • 3 pretzel twists, per Cub Scout
  • 3 chocolate candies such as Kisses or Rolos, per Cub Scout
  • 9 candy corn pieces, per Cub scout
  •  3 yellow candies such as M&Ms or Reese’s Pieces per Cub Scout
  •  6 candy eyes, per Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  2. Gather supplies.
  3. Preheat oven to 200℉.
  4. Prepare the meeting location and ensure there is enough space for Cub Scouts to work with food in a clean environment.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scout and tell them that they are going to help make a treat to celebrate Thanksgiving.  Inform them that Thanksgiving is an American holiday and is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November.  It is a time when Americans give thanks for the things they have in their life.  The first Thanksgiving was held by a group of people we now call the Pilgrims.  They left Europe so they could worship freely and would later become some of the first to colonize the United States.  Modern-day Thanksgiving is celebrated with a big meal that includes cooking a Turkey.
  2. Review the recipe with Cub Scouts.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to wash their hands.
  4. Direct Cub Scouts to place pretzels salted side down with the double round end facing the bottom of the baking sheet.
  5. Unwrap chocolate candies and place one in the center of each pretzel.
  6. Place baking sheet in the oven and allow the chocolate candies to soften for about one minute.
  7. Take the baking sheet out of the oven and begin decorating by placing the candy eyes towards the middle, slightly towards the top, of the melted chocolate candy.
  8. Take a yellow candy, turn it sideways, and insert it below the eyes.
  9. Insert the three pieces of candy corn along the top of the chocolate candy for the feathers.
  10. Place in freezer to solidify for about three minutes.
  11. Remove from tray and store in an airtight container until ready to serve.
Clay Celebration
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Create a clay sculpture that can be used as part of your favorite family faith tradition, holiday, or celebration.

  • Air drying clay, recommend 1lb of clay for each Cub Scout
  • Plastic knife, fork, and spoon, a set for each Cub Scout
  • Toothpicks,  enough to share
  •  ½ gallon of water in a large bowl

Before the meeting:

  1. Inform the parents and legal guardians in the den that at this den meeting Cub Scouts will work on making a craft with clay that represents one of their favorite family faith traditions.  Ask parents and legal guardians to help their Cub Scout think of what they may want to make.  It may be a decoration, a symbol of faith, or a useful object that is used as part of a family faith tradition.
  2. Prepare the meeting space for Cub Scout to work with clay.
  3. Secure a safe location for projects to air dry until the next meeting.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to describe their favorite family holidays and celebrations.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts that they are going to make something that represents a family faith tradition.   This can be a decoration, a symbol of faith, or a useful object that is used as part of a family faith tradition celebration.
  3. Give each Cub Scout a ball of clay and let them know that they can use the fork, knife, spoon, and toothpicks as tools to make their project  Let them know that if their project starts getting hard, they can add some water to their clay to make it easier to work with.
  4. When projects are done, each Cub Scout describes their craft.
  5. Place projects in a safe place so they can air dry until the next meeting.
I Heart String Art
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Create a string art heart.

  • Heart String Art template cut out to 3”x 3” found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer 
  • 5” x 5” piece of white paper, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout 
  • 5” square wooden board, at least ¾” thick, one per Cub Scout 
  • Small nails, at least ½” tall, 28 nails per Cub Scout 
  • Tack hammer, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Colored yarn, one skein for each Cub Scout 
  • Thumb tack, one per Cub Scout 
  • Tape, two pieces per Cub Scout 
  • Safety glasses or eye protection for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting: 

  1. Inform the parents and legal guardians in the den that at this den meeting Cub Scouts will work on making string art that represents one of their favorite family faith traditions.  Ask parents and legal guardians to help their Cub Scout to think of what they may want to make.   
  2. Prepare the meeting space for Cub Scout to work with hammers and nails, give at least arm’s length distance between Cub Scouts. 
  3. Review how to make string art, you may use this YouTube video on beginner string art 
  4. Use the Heart String Art template and make a string art as a sample and to help identify areas that Cub Scouts may need extra help with.   
  5. Secure additional adult supervision to assist with project. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Inform Cub Scouts that they are going to make something that represents a family faith tradition.  This can be  a decoration or a symbol of faith. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts use the 5” x 5” white piece of paper to draw their design. 
  3. Provide each Cub Scout with a square wooden board and tape. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to carefully tape their template onto their wooden board. 
  5. Have Cub Scout put on their safety glasses. 
  6. Tell Cub Scouts to carefully use their tack to pierce holes in their template where the nails should go. Instruct Cub Scouts to push hard enough to puncture the wood beneath the template.  
  7. Advise Cub Scouts to remove their template. They should see where each nail should go. 
  8. Ask Cub Scouts to use their hammer to nail each nail into their board in the designated spots. Nails should not hammer all the way into the wood. Instead, leave approximately ¼” of the nail sticking out of the wood. Remind Cub Scouts to be careful and try to keep their nails straight. 
  9. Tell Cub Scouts to take the end of their yarn and tie around the bottom-most nail leaving a 2-3” tail. Ask Cub Scouts to wrap the yarn around the nails, moving back and forth across their design as much as they can, keeping the string taut. 
  10. Encourage Cub Scouts to use every nail at least once. 
  11. When Cub Scouts have completed their string art have them share what they made with the den. 

Heart String Art template

With your family, attend a religious service OR other gathering that shows how your family expresses reverence.
Attend A Religious Service
LocationTravel
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Attend a religious service based on your family’s choosing.

  • This activity is done with your family.

Before the service:

  1. Cub Scout and parent or legal guardian discuss the service they will attend.
    • What is the significance of this service?
    • How often is this service performed?
    • Is the service divided into different parts?  If so, what are they?

During the service:

  1. Cub Scouts attend a religious service with their parent(s) or legal guardian.

After the service:

  1.  Cub Scout and parent or legal guardian discuss what they took away from the service.
    • How did it make you feel?
    • Is there something that inspired you?
    • What parts of the service did you like the most?
Chartered Partner Celebration
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time4

Attend a celebration at your chartered partner based on a faith tradition.

This activity is designed for packs with a faith-based chartered partner.  Encourage all members of the den to attend even if it is not their family faith tradition.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact your chartered partner to discuss upcoming services and/or celebrations that the den could attend.
  2. Request that a member of the chartered partner meet the den before the service to give the den a brief history of the chartered partner and a description of the service they will be attending.
  3. Send a meeting notice of the date/time/location of the den meeting to all parents or legal guardians in the den a week before the meeting.
  4. Give all parents or legal guardians information about the beliefs of the chartered organization and what service the den will be attending.
  5. Allow parents to opt-out and complete this requirement as a family.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners in the parking lot before entering the chartered partner.
  2. Have a representative from the chartered partner speak to the den about the history of the charter partner and the service the den will be attending.  Have them review any specific behavior, customs, or traditions to follow during the service.
  3. Have the representative from the chartered partner bring you inside and guide the den through the service.
  4. After the service, allow time for members of the den to ask questions to the representative of the chartered organization.
Veterans Day Celebration
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Participate in a Veterans Day celebration

Before the meeting:

  1. Find a Veterans Day celebration in your community.
  2. Identify how your den can participate in the Veterans Day celebration.

During the Meeting:

  1. With the Cub Scouts, review what a veteran is and why we celebrate Veterans Day.  Veterans Day is a U.S. federal holiday that is dedicated to honoring and remembering American veterans  whether they are currently serving or not. This day provides us with the opportunity to show our gratitude for all the sacrifices they made and still make to ensure our safety and freedom.
  2. Travel to the community event and participate in the celebration.

After the Meeting:

  1. Send a thank you note to event organizers expressing appreciation for the opportunity to honor community veterans.
Carry out an act of kindness.
Kindness Jar
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Write nice words about your parent or legal guardian and put them in a jar.

  • Jar/small box/can, one per Cub Scout
  • Ribbons
  • Stickers
  • Paper
  • Glue
  • Six 1” x 4” pieces of paper per Cub Scout
  • Pen/thin sharpie

Before the Meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to bring a small jar, box, or can to the meeting.
  2. Prepare a list of “kind words” that Cub Scouts could write about their parent or legal guardian. This could include words about:
    • Giving the best hugs
    • Making great lunches, dinners, etc.
    • Help with homework
    • How much they love the parent or legal guardian
    • A memory of a fun activity
    • Baking cookies
    • Or anything else that the Cub Scout thinks is a kind gesture

During the Meeting:

  1. Hand out six pieces of paper.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to write one thing that their parent or legal guardian does that means a lot to them on each piece of paper. Use the prepared list to give ideas to the Cub Scouts.
  3. Using craft supplies, Cub Scouts decorate their container.
  4. After the container is decorated, Cub Scouts put the pieces of paper with the kind words on them in them.
  5. Have Cub Scouts give the kindness jars to their parents or legal guardian after the meeting.
Make A Friend
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Talk to someone new at school.

  • At least 2 Cub Scouts

During the meeting:

  1. Talk to Cub Scouts about what it feels like when they don’t know anyone.
  2. Brainstorm ideas on how Cub Scouts can make new friends at school (smile, be kind, be friendly, etc.).
  3. Tell Cub Scouts that they need to talk to someone at school that they don’t know well.

At the next meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts how meeting someone new went.
  2. Discuss how being kind or friendly to someone might make that person feel.
Thank A Teacher
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Write a thank you card for a teacher.

  • Paper of any size, one for each Cub Scout
  • Card stock paper, 8 ½” x 11”, one for each Cub Scout
  • Markers, colored pencils, or crayons
  • Pens
  • Stickers and other items to decorate the card

Before the meeting:

  1. Lay out paper and craft supplies.

During the meeting:

  1. Review how to write a thank you card.
    • Begin with a warm greeting such as “Dear Ms. Baranowski” or “Hi Mr. Temple.”
    • Express your gratitude such as “I wanted to take a moment to thank you for …”
    • Be specific and write about the impact such as “helping me better understand math.”
    • Share personal experiences where they went above and beyond such as “I appreciate your willingness to use your lunchtime to review math facts with me.”
    • Conclude with appreciation and well wishes such as “Thank you for everything you have done to help me.”
    • Sign off with your name.
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to write out their thank you on a sheet of white paper first.
  3. After they have written their thank you note, ask Cub Scouts to create their thank you card.
    • Have Cub Scouts fold the cardstock in half.
    • Have them write their note on the inside of the card.
    • Decorate the outside of the card.
  4. Once complete, ask Cub Scouts to give their thank you notes to their teachers at school the next time they see them.
With your parent or legal guardian identify a religion or faith that is different from your own. Determine two things that it has in common with your family’s beliefs.
Common Faith Elements
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn about a religion different from your own and name two things that it has in common with your family’s beliefs.

  • Common Faith Elements worksheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1. Print the Common Faith Elements worksheet, enough for one per Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Lead a discussion on faith and religions using the worksheet.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to identify what faith or religion their family practices.
  3. Talk through other faiths using the comparative religion worksheet as a guide.
  4. Point out that while faiths can have differences all faiths have the Golden Rule as part of their core beliefs.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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