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Floats And Boats – Tiger

Elective Adventure

Discovering what floats and how to make a model boat are the key activities in this Adventure.

Requirements

Identify five different types of boats.
Color The Boats
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Color the boats in the Tiger handbook.

  • Each Cub Scout will need their Tiger handbook, page 37
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners have a place to complete the coloring activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts that there are different types of boats.  Some are powered by humans, some are powered by the wind, and some are powered by motors.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts look at the different boats on page 37 of the Tiger handbook.  Ask them
    • “What boats do you see that are powered by humans?”
    • “What boat do you see that are powered by the wind?”
    • “What boat do you see that are powered by a motor?
  3. Rowboat – a rowboat is powered by a human.  Using oars, you row by pulling the oars toward you when they are in the water.  It may seem wrong, but the proper way to row in a rowboat is to face the back of the boat and have your back toward where you are rowing.
  4. Canoe – a canoe is also powered by a human.  Using a paddle, you paddle a canoe by pulling the paddle toward you when it is in the water.
  5. Kayak – a kayak is also powered by a human.  Using a special paddle that has two blades, you paddle a kayak by using one paddle blade on one side and then the other paddle blade on the other side.
  6. Sailboats – a sailboat is powered by the wind.  The large sail catches the wind, like a kite, to push the boat across the water.
  7. Motorboats – a motorboat is powered by an engine.  The engine spins a propeller under the water to push the boat across the water.
  8. Have Cub Scouts color the different types of boats.
Model Boats
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Identify different types of boats using models.

  • A toy or model of the following boats
    • Rowboat
    • Kayak
    • Canoe
    • Motorboat
    • Sailboat
  • Each Cub Scout will need their Tiger handbook, page 37
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners have a place to complete the coloring activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts that there are different types of boats.  Some are powered by humans, some are powered by the wind, and some are powered by motors.
  2. Use the toy or model of each boat to introduce the type of boat it is.
    • Rowboat – a rowboat is powered by a human.  Using oars, you row by pulling the oars toward you when they are in the water.  It may seem wrong, but the proper way to row in a rowboat is to face the back of the boat and have your back toward where you are rowing.
    • Canoe – a canoe is also powered by a human.  Using a paddle, you paddle a canoe by pulling the paddle toward you when it is in the water.
    • Kayak – a kayak is also powered by a human.  Using a special paddle that has two blades, you paddle a kayak by using one paddle blade on one side and then the other paddle blade on the other side.
    • Sailboats – a sailboat is powered by the wind.  The large sail catches the wind, like a kite, to push the boat across the water.
    • Motorboats – a motorboat is powered by an engine.  The engine spins a propeller under the water to push the boat across the water.
  3. Have the Cub Scouts color the different boats in the Tiger handbook on page 37.
Visit A Marina
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

See real boats by visiting a marina.

Before the meeting:

  1. Locate a marina and schedule a visit.
  2. Confirm the name and number of the contact person at the facility who will give the tour of the marina and the different types of boats.
  3. Ask the contact person to share with the Cub Scouts when they visit to show five different types of boats, canoe, kayak, rowboat, sailboat, and motorboat.
  4. Inform parents and legal guardians about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting location.
  2. Have the contact person discuss the five different types of boats.
  3. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.
  4. Have Cub Scouts thank the person who guided the tour.

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the facility and send it to the contact person.
Identify five things that float and five things that do not float.
Floating or Sinking?
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time3

In a tub discover things that float and things that do not.

  • 17-gallon tub
  • Twelve gallons of water
  • 5 things that float
    • Rubber duck
    • Toy boat
    • Balloon
    • A cork from a bottle
    • Dry sponge
  • Five things that do not float
    • Quarter
    • Small rock
    • Metal spoon
    • Metal key
    • Metal screwdriver
  • Hand towel

Before the meeting:

  1. Fill a 17-gallon tub with about twelve gallons of water outside.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners around the tub filled with water.
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that some things float, and some things don’t. What makes something float naturally is if it is more solid (called density) than the water.  The weight of the object doesn’t matter as much as how solid it is or dense it is.  Something can also float based on how it is designed.  A big battleship is made out of metal but because of the way a boat is designed it stays afloat.
  3. Show the Cub Scouts the 5 things that float and the 5 things that do not.  Take each object and ask the Cub Scouts if they think it will float or sink?  Once they respond place the item in the tub of water to see what happens.
Build or create a model boat and float it on the water. This can be made from recycled materials or other items.
Crafty Boat
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Make a model boat from recycled and craft supplies.

  • 17-gallon tub
  • Twelve gallons of water
  • Supplies to make boats, a set for each Cub Scout
    • 2 – 16.9 oz empty plastic water bottles
    • 14 – 6” wooden popsicle sticks
    • 3 rubber bands
    • 3” x 5” index card
    • Small ball of playdough
  • Supplies needed to make boats, enough to share
    • Crayons
    • Duct tape
    • Scissors

Before the meeting:

  1. Fill the 17-gallon tub with about 12 gallons of water.
  2. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to make craft boats.
  3. Lay out the materials needed to make the boats.
  4. Follow the directions to make the boat and make one yourself to have as a model.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and inform them that they will be making a boat out of craft materials and some recycled materials.  Show them your boat as a model.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts, with help from their adult partners make the boat.
  3. Step One – Take eleven popsicle sticks and lay them flat, side by side and tape them together to make the deck of the boat.
  4. Step Two – Place two water bottles together horizontally.  Place the deck of the boat made in step one on top.
  5. Step Three – Use the rubber bands to wrap around the back of the water bottles, the middle (including the deck), and the front of the water bottles.
  6. Step four – Add the playdough to the middle of the deck and stick a popsicle stick in it to create the mast.
  7. Step five – Tape the 3” x 5” index card to the mast to make the sale.
  8. Once a Cub Scout and adult partner has made their boat have them float it in the tub filled with water.

Tip: There are several ways to build a craft boat, feel free to alter supplies or materials to make your own boat.

Paper Boat
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Fold paper to make a boat using the Tiger handbook.

  • 17-gallon tub
  • Twelve gallons of water
  • Each Cub Scout will need their Tiger handbook, page 39
  • 8.5” x 11” piece of construction paper, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to make their boats.
  2. Fill up the tub with water.
  3. Follow the directions on page 39 of the Tiger handbook to make your own boat.
  4. You can also watch this YouTube video How To Make a Paper Boat That Floats – Origami Boat.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and inform them that they will be making a boat out paper.  Show them your boat as a model.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts, with help from their adult partners make the boat.
  3. Step One – Get your 8.5” x 11” paper.
  4. Step Two – Fold the paper in half to make it 8.5” x 5.5”.
  5. Step Three – Take the corners of the folded side of the paper and fold them diagonally to form a triangle.  You will have a small section of paper that is not folded on the bottom.
  6. Step Four – Fold the bottom part of the paper up on one side, then flip the boat over and fold the other bottom part of the paper up.
  7. Step Five – Pull from the bottom center (the flat part) to open up the ship.  At this point it may look like a hat.  Keep pulling it and then fold it flat.  It should now be flat and square.
  8. Step Six – Keep the paper flat with the folded pieces down.
  9. Step Seven – Fold the bottom part (with the folded pieces) up to the top, flip the paper over and do the same for the other side.  Now you should have a triangle.
  10. Step Eight – Like you did in step five, pull open the ship from the bottom.  This time do not make it flat.  adult partners may need to help at this point.
  11. Step Nine – With the bottom of the ship still a little open pull down the two sides.
  12. Step Ten – As you pull down the two sides allow the paper to bend and fold to form the ship.
  13. Once Cub Scouts have completed the making their ship have them test it out in the tub filled with water.
Raingutter Regatta Floating Boat
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Make a Raingutter Regatta boat.

  • 17-gallon tub
  • Twelve gallons of water
  • Raingutter Regatta™ boat kit
  • Phillips head screwdriver
  • Sandpaper, 200 grit
  • Paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Glue

Before the meeting:

  1. This requirement can be combined with the Tiger Race Time Adventure, Cub Scouts need only make one boat to meet the requirement for both Adventures.
  2. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to make boats.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and inform them that they will be making a boat out of craft materials and some recycled materials.  Show them your boat as a model.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts, with help from their adult partners make the boat.
  3. Sand the wooden hulls. It is easier to sand the wooden hulls before the boat is assembled.
  4. Attach the plastic cabin to the two wooden hulls using the screws provided.
  5. Paint and decorate your boat. If  painting, use a primer first. This will help the paint stick to the plastic parts of the boat. The sail may be decorated also.
  6. Assemble the sail and mast. Use a small bit of glue in the hole where the mast will go, then place the mast into the hole. Allow the glue to dry before attaching the sail.

Tip: Add wax to the bottom of the boat, the hull, to make it extra smooth. The smoother the hull, the faster the boat can go.

Show that you can put on and fasten a life jacket correctly and learn when it is safe to enter a boat.
Life Jacket Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Once Cub Scouts learn how to proper fit a life jacket conduct a relay race.

  • Properly fitted life jackets for Cub Scouts and adult partners

This requirement does not require Cub Scouts to be on the water.  If you plan on conducting a boating activity you must have an adult leader who has completed BSA’s Safety Afloat training.

Before the meeting:

  1. Review the How to Choose The Right Life Jacket brochure from the United States Coast Guard.
  2. Review BSA content on Life Jackets / Personal Floatation Devices.
  3. Prepare a location that is free of obstacle to conduct a relay race.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts and adult partners that anytime they are on a boat they are to have a lifejacket on and the only time they are to get on a boat is when there is a properly trained adult present.
  2. Have Cub Scouts try on life jackets and check for the proper fit.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners divide into two teams.
  4. Take the life jackets and place them approximately twenty feet from the starting line.
  5. Explain the rules of the relay race.
  6. The first person on each team must run to the pile of life jackets and properly put it on and then run back to the start line, run back to the pile of life jackets and take the life jacket off and then run back to the start.  The next person in line now takes a turn.  The first team to finish wins.
Proper Fit – Proper Safety
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts try on a properly fitted life jacket.

  • Properly fitted life jackets for Cub Scouts and adult partners

This requirement does not require Cub Scouts to be on the water.  If you plan on conducting a boating activity you must have an adult leader who has completed BSA’s Safety Afloat training.

Before the meeting:

  1. Review the How to Choose The Right Life Jacket brochure from the United States Coast Guard.
  2. Review BSA content on Life Jackets / Personal Floatation Devices.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts and adult partners that anytime they are on a boat they are to have a lifejacket on and the only time they are to get on a boat is when there is a properly trained adult present.
  2. Review how to properly fit a life jacket with the Cub Scouts and adult partners.
  3. Have adult partners assist their Cub Scout with putting on a life jacket and checking to make sure it is fitted properly.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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