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Fun On The Run – Lion

Required Adventure

In this Adventure, Lions will explore the different food groups, have fun being active, and the importance of rest.

Requirements

Identify the five different food groups.
Snack Time
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts bring and share their favorite food from one of the five food groups.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 13
  • Snack Time adult partner notification found in Additional Resources
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Images of foods that are in the five different food groups
  • Cub Scouts bring their favorite food from one of the five food groups
  • Plates
  • Napkins
  • Access to hand washing area
  • Cups
  • Drinking water
  • Forks or toothpicks
  • Instructions for adult partners to prepare for the meeting
  • Cleaning supplies to wipe down eating areas before and after the meeting
  • Table for serving food samples
  • Tables and chairs for Cub Scouts and adult partners to eat at
  • 5 – 3” x 5” index cards
  • Marker

Before the meeting:

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.
  2. Review the “Snack Time adult partner notification” for adult partners. Make any necessary edits and send it to all parents and adult partners in the den at least two weeks before the den meeting.  You may need to adjust how many different types of food you ask each Cub Scout to bring based on the size of your den.
  3. Send a reminder to adult partners a week prior to the meeting.
  4. Send a reminder to adult partners a day prior to the meeting.
  5. Confirm that at least one food item from each of the five food groups will be available.
  6. Prepare the meeting space to have food samples and a place for everyone to eat.
  7. Clean surfaces where food will be.
  8. Use the 3”x5” index cards to make labels for the five different food groups.
  9. Space the index cards on the table to label where Cub Scouts and adult partners are to place their food.

During the meeting:

  1. As Cub Scouts and adult partners bring in the food have them place it on the table in the appropriate food group the item belongs to.
  2. Have each Cub Scout and adult partner talk about their food item and what food group it belongs to.
That Food is in the Wrong Group
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Activity for Cub Scouts to identify food groups and what doesn’t belong.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 13
  • Crayons of various colors, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.
  2. Set up the meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity in the handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Introduce the five different food groups and what types of food are in each group.
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to complete the activity on page 13 of the Lion handbook.
What Food Group Do I Belong To?
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Use play food to help Cub Scouts identify the five different food groups.

Based on the number of Cub Scouts and adult partners in our den you may want to adjust the amount of supplies for this activity. 

  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are vegetables
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are fruits
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are proteins
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are grains
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are dairy
  • 5 small boxes, approximately 2’x2’x2’
  • Black marker
  • Pillowcase
  • Stopwatch

Before the meeting:

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.
  2. Set up an area clear of obstacles to conduct a relay race.
  3. Label one box for each food group: vegetables, fruits, proteins, grains, and dairy.
  4. Line up the five boxes in a row.

During the meeting:

  1. Introduce the five different food groups and what types of food are in each group.
  2. Each Cub Scout and their adult partner will form a team.  The objective is to properly sort each food item into the correct box in the fastest time.  For every incorrect item 3 seconds will be added to their time.
  3. Place all the play food into the pillowcase.  Have the first team stand in front of the five boxes.  Tell them that when you hand them the pillowcase you will start the timer.  They must pick one food item out of the pillowcase at a time and name the good group it belongs to and place it in the correct box.  Remind them if they get a good item incorrect (either my naming it out loud or placing it in the wrong box) 3 seconds will be added to their time.
  4. Have each Cub Scout and adult partner team compete for the best time.
Practice hand washing. Point out when you should wash your hands.
Bubbles Good Clean Fun
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts pop bubbles and wash their hands.

Before the meeting:

  1. Confirm a meeting location that has a sink for Cub Scouts to wash their hands.
  2. Identify a safe area free of obstacles where you can blow bubbles for the Cub Scouts to pop.
  3. Review the article Clean Hands Save Lives from the CDC.
  4. Set up a handwashing station with soap and paper towels.
  5. Print the Wash Your Hands poster and place it at the handwashing station.
  6. Print the Know When to Wash Your Hands at School poster and place it at the handwashing station.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners outside and hand each adult partner the bubbles.  Have adult partners blow bubbles and have Cub Scouts pop the bubbles with their hands.  After they have done this for a while, the Cub Scouts rub their hands and ask them what they notice.
  2. Share with Cub Scouts that bubbles are just a type of soap, this makes playing with bubbles good clean fun.
  3. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners inside and ask when you should wash your hands.  Give everyone who wants to share a chance to answer.  Review any item that wasn’t mentioned.
    • After you go to the bathroom
    • After you play with a dog, a cat, or other animal
    • After you blow your nose, sneeze, or cough
    • After you touch garbage
    • Before and after you help to prepare food
    • Before you handle plates, utensils, or cups
    • Before you eat
    • When your hands have dirt on them
    • When your hands have been touching a lot of things that others have touched
  4. Bring Cub Scouts over to the handwashing station to demonstrate how to wash your hands.
    • Put your hands under clean, running water.  Put soap on your hands. Turn off the water.
    • Rub your hands together palm to palm.  They should get sudsy.
    • With your left palm facing down, place your right hand on top of your left and interlock your finger. Scrub vigorously to clean the space between your fingers. Switch hands and repeat.
    • With your right hand, grab your left thumb and rotate your hand around it. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Take the tips of your fingers and press them into your opposite palm, rotating them around the palm in a circular motion. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Rinse the soap from your hands, grab a towel or paper towel and then use it to turn the faucet off.
  5. After you have demonstrated the steps to washing hands inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that the time it takes to do all these steps should be the time it takes for you to sing the Happy Birthday song.
  6. Have each Cub Scout take a turn washing their hands following the steps as they sing the Happy Birthday song.
Happy Birthday Clean Hands
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Practice handwashing and learn to wash your hands while singing happy birthday.

Before the meeting:

  1. Confirm a meeting location that has a sink for Cub Scouts to wash their hands.
  2. Review the article Clean Hands Save Lives from the CDC.
  3. Set up a handwashing station with soap and paper towels.
  4. Print the Wash Your Hands poster and place it at the handwashing station.
  5. Print the Know When to Wash Your Hands at School poster and place it at the handwashing station.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask when you should wash your hands.  Give everyone who wants to share a chance to answer.  Review any item that wasn’t mentioned.
    • After you go to the bathroom
    • After you play with a dog, a cat, or other animal
    • After you blow your nose, sneeze, or cough
    • After you touch garbage
    • Before and after you help to prepare food
    • Before you handle plates, utensils, or cups
    • Before you eat
    • When your hands have dirt on them
    • When your hands have been touching a lot of things that others have touched
  2. Bring Cub Scouts over to the handwashing station to demonstrate how to wash your hands.
    • Put your hands under clean, running water.  Put soap on your hands. Turn off the water.
    • Rub your hands together palm to palm.  They should get sudsy.
    • With your left palm facing down, place your right hand on top of your left and interlock your finger. Scrub vigorously to clean the space between your fingers. Switch hands and repeat.
    • With your right hand, grab your left thumb and rotate your hand around it. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Take the tips of your fingers and press them into your opposite palm, rotating them around the palm in a circular motion. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Rinse the soap from your hands, grab a towel or paper towel and then use it to turn the faucet off.
  3. After you have demonstrated the steps to washing hands inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that the time it takes to do all these steps should be the time it takes for you to sing the Happy Birthday song.
  4. Have each Cub Scout take a turn washing their hands following the steps as they sing the Happy Birthday song.
Steps To Washing Your Hands
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Practice handwashing and put the steps to washing hands in the right order.

Before the meeting:

  1. Confirm a meeting location that has a sink for Cub Scouts to wash their hands.
  2. Identify a safe area free of obstacles where you can blow bubbles for the Cub Scouts to pop.
  3. Review the article Clean Hands Save Lives from the CDC.
  4. Set up a handwashing station with soap and paper towels.
  5. Print out the Wash Your Hands poster and place it at the handwashing station.
  6. Print out the Know When to Wash Your Hands at School poster and place it at the handwashing station.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask when you should wash your hands.  Give everyone who wants to share a chance to answer.  Review any item that wasn’t mentioned.
    • After you go to the bathroom
    • After you play with a dog, a cat, or other animal
    • After you blow your nose, sneeze, or cough
    • After you touch garbage
    • Before and after you help to prepare food
    • Before you handle plates, utensils, or cups
    • Before you eat
    • When your hands have dirt on them
    • When your hands have been touching a lot of things that others have touched
  2. Bring Cub Scouts over to the handwashing station to demonstrate how to wash your hands.
    • Put your hands under clean, running water.  Put soap on your hands. Turn off the water.
    • Rub your hands together palm to palm.  They should get sudsy.
    • With your left palm facing down, place your right hand on top of your left and interlock your finger. Scrub vigorously to clean the space between your fingers. Switch hands and repeat.
    • With your right hand, grab your left thumb and rotate your hand around it. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Take the tips of your fingers and press them into your opposite palm, rotating them around the palm in a circular motion. Switch hands and repeat.
    • Rinse the soap from your hands, grab a towel or paper towel and then use it to turn the faucet off.
  3. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 14 of the Lion handbook.
  4. After you have demonstrated the steps to washing hands inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that the time it takes to do all these steps should be the time it takes for you to sing the Happy Birthday song.
  5. Have each Cub Scout take a turn washing their hands following the steps as they sing the Happy Birthday song.
Be active for 20 minutes.
It’s Time for Lions to Dance
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Have a dance party with Cub Scouts and adult partners.

  • Age-appropriate music playlist, ideas for playlist includes songs that have dance moves
    • The Twist – Chubby Checker – 1960
    • YMCA – The Village People 1978
    • Locomotion – Kylie Minogue 1987
    • Electric Boogie (Electric Slide) – Marcia Griffiths 1989
    • Achy Breaky Heart – Billy Ray Cyrus 1992
    • Macarena – Los Del Rio 1996
    • Cha Cha Slide – DJ Casper 2000
    • Whip/Nae Nae – Silento 2015
    • Pinkfong – Baby Shark 2015
  • Smart device with music and speakers to play music
  • Timer

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up a dance area that is free of obstacles.
  2. Create the playlist and share it with parents, legal guardians, and adult partners and if the song has a dance to it provide them a link to a video that shows the dance move so they can practice.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that part of being healthy is staying active and moving around. This helps your muscles, including your heart, and it is also good for your brain.  One way to do this is to dance.
  2. Have fun dancing to songs and teaching dance moves for at least 20 minutes.
Lion Freeze Tag
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Play a game of Freeze Tag.

  • 4 sports cones
  • Timer

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to play freeze tag.  Marke the area off with a sports cone at each corner of the play area.  A recommended space is 60’ x 60’, adjust the size based on the number of Cub Scouts in your den.
  2. Become familiar with the rules to freeze tag.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that part of being healthy is staying active and moving around. This helps your muscles, including your heart, and it is also good for your brain.
  2. Inform the den they are going to play freeze tag.  Demonstrate that when playing tag only a light tag from the waist up is allowed.  If you hit someone or tackle someone or roughhouse you will be removed from the remainder of the round and have to sit out the next round.
  3. Explain the rules to freeze tag. Pick two Cub Scouts to be “It”.  When the game starts, the “it” Cub Scouts chase the other Cub Scouts who are not “it”.  The Cub Scouts who are “it” have 3 minutes to work together and try to tag and freeze the other Cub Scouts. When the player who is “it” tags another player, they tap them and say “FREEZE!”  The Cub Scouts who are not “it” need to run, dodge, and hide from the players who are “it”. They also unfreeze other participants who have been frozen by tapping them and saying “UNFREEZE!”  The game is won either by the Cub Scouts who are “it” when they have frozen all other players, or it is won by the “not it” Cub Scouts when 3 minutes have run out and at least 1 player is still unfrozen.
  4. Have Cub Scouts play freeze tag for at least 20 minutes.
Lion Says
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Play a game of Simon Says.

  • At least two Cub Scouts
  • Timer

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with how to play “Simon Says”. One person is Simon, in this version we will say Lion, and the other players follow Lion’s instructions. Standing in front of the group Lion tells the players what they must do. The players must obey all commands that begin with the words “Lion says”. If Lion says, “Lion says touch your nose” then all players must touch their nose.  However, if Lion says, “jump” without saying “Lion says” first the players must not jump. If they do jump, that player is out until the next game.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that part of being healthy is staying active and moving around. This helps your muscles, including your heart, and it is also good for your brain.
  2. Play Lion Says for at least 20 minutes.
Practice methods that help you rest.
Animals Sleep Just Like Me
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Learn that animals sleep and rest too, but some do so during the day and some during the night.

  • Lions need their Lion handbook, page 15
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with nocturnal animals and those that are diurnal (di·ur·nal).

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that it is important that we not only eat foods that will keep us healthy and to stay active to exercise our muscles It is also important to give our body a chance to rest and to sleep.
  2. Share with the Cub Scouts the things you learned about nocturnal animals and those that are diurnal.
    • Owls and Opossums are nocturnal which means they sleep during the day and are active at night.  They are active during these times for two different reasons.  Owls eat mice and other small rodents as do many other birds, but most other birds sleep during the night, this means that there is less competition for owls when they are hunting.  Opossums are nocturnal so avoid predators (other animals that eat them) and it is also when most of the animals they hunt are active.
    • Dogs and birds are diurnal which means they are like us; they are active during the day and sleep at night.  Dogs are domesticated, meaning they rely on humans for food, shelter, and protection so dogs keep the same active patterns as their owners.  Most birds are also diurnal and are active during the day and sleep at night.
    • Ask Cub Scouts if they think cats are diurnal or nocturnal and have them explain why they think that.  Cats are actually special.  It may seem to us that all they do is sleep during the day and night and that is somewhat true.  Cats are known as crepuscular (cre·pus·cu·lar) which means they are most active when the sun is just starting to come up (dawn) and when the sun is about to go down (dusk).
  3. Have the adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 15 of the Lion handbook.
  4. When they are finished with the activity have the adult partners talk to their Cub Scouts about when they go to bed and when they wake up.  Do they feel rested with they wake up in the morning?  Are they getting enough sleep?  Lion aged Cub Scouts should get about 10 hours of sleep a night.
Music Can Soothe the Savage Beast
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Learn how music can influence your ability to rest and relax.

  • Age-appropriate music playlist with different beats
    • Ideas for the playlist for upbeat music
      • Y’all Ready for This (Space Jam Theme)
      • We Will Rock You (Queen)
    • Ideas for the playlist for dramatic music
      • Theme for the movie Jaws
      • The Imperial March (Star Wars)
    • Ideas for the playlist for soothing music
      • 5 Lieder, Op. 49: No. 4, Wiegenlied (Brahms’s Lullaby)
      • Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 “Moonlight Sonata”
  • Smart device with music and speakers to play music

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up a playlist with music that is upbeat, music that is dramatic, and music that is soothing.  Set up the speaker with your smart device.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that it is important that we not only eat foods that will keep us healthy and to stay active to exercise our muscles It is also important to give our body a chance to rest and to sleep.
  2. One way to rest and relax is to listen to music, however not just any music can help you relax.  Music can really affect your mood. For example, how do you feel when you hear this?  Play an upbeat song.
  3. Allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to reflect on how the song made them feel.
  4. Play each type of song and ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners to reflect on how the song makes them feel.
  5. Discuss how some songs can get you energized, and some are little scary, and some can really help you relax or even fall asleep.
  6. Play relaxing music for the den and have everyone close their eyes as they listen to one soothing piece of music.
What Time is Bedtime?
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Adult partners work with Cub Scouts to establish good bedtime habits.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 45
  • Crayons, enough to share

This activity also meets Requirement 2 of the I’ll Do It Myself Elective Adventure 

Before the Meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity together.

During the Meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that it is important that we not only eat foods that will keep us healthy and to stay active to exercise our muscles It is also important to give our body a chance to rest and to sleep.
  2. Share with the Cub Scouts that doing the same thing each night is the same order helps send messages to your body that is it time to go to bed.  Share with them that this is called a routine.  A regular nightly routine will help you get the rest you need each night.  Cub Scouts who are Lions need about 10 hours of sleep each night.
  3. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to color the activity on page 45 of the Lion handbook.
  4. When they are done have adult partners talk to Cub Scouts about what time they should be in bed sleeping and what time they need to get up each day.  Are they getting enough sleep?
  5. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to put a time when each part of their nightly routine should take place to make sure the Cub Scouts are getting enough sleep.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure:

  • Review the Food Allergies safety moment.
  • Review each Cub Scouts BSA Annual Health and Medical Record for any food allergies or restrictions.
  • Ask if any member of the den, youth, or adult, has any religious, or cultural dietary concerns.
  • there is someone in the den, youth, or adults, who carries an EpiPen due to severe allergies make sure that at least one other adult knows how to administer the EpiPen. To learn more, review this Safety Moment on anaphylaxis.
  • ​​Review​ the Keep Your Food Safe guide to properly keep, store, and prepare food.

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