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Let’s Camp Tiger

Elective Adventure

Here is the opportunity for Tigers and their adult partners to go on an overnight campout.

Requirements

Learn about the buddy system and how it works in the outdoors.
Back To Back Buddies
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scout buddies work together to stand up while sitting on the floor back-to-back.

  • Back-to-Back Get Up worksheet found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the buddy system by watching “The Buddy System.” (duration 1 minute, 42 seconds)
  2. Review the Back-to-Back Get Up worksheet. Either print it or have it available on a smart device to share with Cub Scouts.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and say: “The buddy system is when two Cub Scouts work together, share, and keep each other safe. The den leader decides how buddies are paired. If there is an odd number of Cub Scouts, you can have a buddy group of no more than three.   Having a buddy is especially important when you are doing an activity outdoors, particularly near or on the water.   When you have a buddy, you are not to let your buddy out of your sight. As buddies you are friends, so remember the points of the Scout Law to be friendly, courteous, and kind to each other. You keep each other safe by following any rules or instructions for the activity”
  2. Assign buddies for the Cub Scouts, it is best to pair similar sized Cub Scouts together for the activity to have the greatest success.
  3. Have two Cub Scouts on the floor back-to-back with their arms locked.  Without letting go, they try to stand up.  This is done by bringing their feet close to their body and pushing back against back as they lift their bodies.
Who Is Being A Buddy?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Using an activity sheet identify who is using the buddy system.

  • Buddy System activity sheet found in Additional Resources
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Printer
  • Paper

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the buddy system by watching “The Buddy System.” (duration 1 minute, 42 seconds)
  2. Print and cut out Buddy System activity sheet, one for each Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and say: “The buddy system is when two Cub Scouts work together, share, and keep each other safe. The den leader decides how buddies are paired. If there is an odd number of Cub Scouts, you can have a buddy group of no more than three.   Having a buddy is especially important when you are doing an activity outdoors, particularly near or on the water.   When you have a buddy, you are not to let your buddy out of your sight. As buddies you are friends, so remember the points of the Scout Law to be friendly, courteous, and kind to each other. You keep each other safe by following any rules or instructions for the activity”
  2. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners identify and color the pictures on the activity sheet that demonstrate the use of the buddy system.

Buddy System activity sheet

Before going on the overnight campout, discuss what type of weather is expected and what type of clothes you should wear.
What Is The Weather Like There?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts look at a weather report for the campout.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 42
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Smart device with internet access and a weather app

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity in their handbook together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them work together to complete page 42 of the Tiger handbook.
  2. Once everyone has completed the activity in the handbook share with them that next the den is going look at what the weather will be like for the campout.
  3. Pull up the weather app and set the location for where the campout will be held.  Look for the forecast.
  4. Discuss with Cub Scouts and adult partners what will they need to bring on the campout based on the forecast.
What To Wear? What To Wear? When Camping
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts pick out clothes that are appropriate for different types of weather.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 42
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Small bookbag or day bag
  • 2 sets of various outdoor clothes
    • T-shirt
    • Shorts
    • Poncho or rain jacket
    • Hat
    • Long pants
    • Wool socks
    • Long sleeve shirt
    • Winter coat
    • Wool skull cap
    • Hoodie or light jacket

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity in their handbook together.
  2. Designate an area that is free of obstacles for a relay race.
  3. Lay out the different clothes for the outdoors together in a pile on the ground.as they should be for the season that you would wear them.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them work together to complete page 42 of the Tiger handbook.
  2. Once everyone has completed the activity in the handbook share with them that next the den is going to run a relay race.
  3. Explain the rules of the relay to the Cub Scouts and adult partners.  Adult partners are going to play too.
  4. Everyone will form a line about ten yards away from the pile of clothes.  The first person in line is holding the backpack and waits for the den leader to call out a season (summer, spring, fall, winter).  When the den leader says the season that person then runs to the piles of clothes and gathers the clothes that match the season.  When they bring the bag back, they empty the clothes, and the den decides if all the clothes are right for the season.
Pack up your Cub Scout Six Essentials for the campout.
Six Essentials Scavenger Hunt
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts go on a scavenger hunt to collect Cub Scout Six Essentials.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 43
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials
    • Water bottle
    • First Aid Kit (small)
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sunscreen
    • Trail Mix
  • Six other camping items
    • Sleeping bag
    • Pillow
    • Bath towel
    • Backpack
    • Bowl
    • Spoon

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching the “Six Essentials” video. (duration 4 minutes)
  2. Hide the Cub Scout six essentials and the other six camping items around the meeting location.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and tell them that the Cub Scout Six Essentials are the six things they should have with them when they go on an outdoor adventure either in Cub Scouting or when they are with their family.  After learning about the Cub Scout Six Essentials, you will play a game to see what they have learned.
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials with the Cub Scouts using what you learned in the Cub Scout Six Essentials video.
  3. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partner complete the activity on page 43 of the Tiger handbook.
  4. Tell the Cub Scouts and adult partners that you have hidden the six essentials in the meeting room.
  5. Have the den work together to find the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
Six Essentials Shopping Spree
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Provide Cub Scouts their own Cub Scout Six Essentials.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 43
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials, one for each Cub Scout
    • Water bottle
    • First Aid Kit (small)
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sunscreen
    • Trail Mix

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching the “Six Essentials” video. (duration 4 minutes)
  2. Set up the room to have 6 tables set up.  Each table will have one of the Cub Scout Six Essentials (one for each Cub Scout).
  3. Secure additional adult supervision so that there is an adult at each of the six tables who can share with the Cub Scout what the essential is at their table, why it is important, and how to use it.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and tell them that the Cub Scout Six Essentials are the six things they should have with them when they go on an outdoor adventure either in Cub Scouting or when they are with their family.
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials with the Cub Scouts using what you learned in the Cub Scout Six Essentials video.
  3. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partner complete the activity on page 43 of the Tiger handbook.
  4. Cub Scouts are instructed to go to each table to learn about and receive their six essentials.
Learn a camping skill.
Flashlight Tiger Hunt
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Learn about the different flashlight and flashlight etiquette.

  • Have Cub Scouts bring their flashlight that is part of their Cub Scout Six Essentials
    OR provide a flashlight for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 12 – 3 ¼ “ diameter reflectors
  • 1” decals of reflective numbers 1 through 12

This activity must be done after the sun has gone down.

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn about flashlights and headlamps in this Scout Life magazine article “How to Buy a Great Headlamp or Flashlight.”
  2. Scout leaders, let’s shine some light on flashlight etiquette.
  3. Place the number decals on the reflectors numbering them 1 – 12.
  4. Outside find locations to set up red reflectors along a path or trail or other designated area.  The idea will be for Cub Scouts to use their flashlights to find all 12 reflectors (representing the 12 points of the Scout Law), be creative by placing some flat on the ground, up high, down low, and in other places where Cub Scouts and adult partners will have to look around to find them.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that in this activity they will learn about flashlights and then go on a hunt for the 12 points of the Scout Law.
  2. Review with the Cub Scouts and adult partners the information about flashlights from the Scout Life magazine article.
  3. Review flashlight etiquette:
    • Hide the light source (bulb or filament) from view to reduce the harshness and impact on night vision. You could bounce the light off the ceiling of your tent, pop-up or pavilion.
    • Equip younger Scouts with LED glowstick necklaces instead of bright headlamps. They’re cheap and easier to track and identify in the dark.
    • When walking down paths or looking for gear in bags, all you really need is a zipper pull-style pinch LED light. “I buy these in quantity as Scout handouts as they’re a compact way to achieve your essentials,” Johnston tells me.
    • Lights with red bulbs won’t disturb others or ruin night vision. They can be found as an option in flashlights, headlamps, or even those zippers pull lights. “Plus, they’re a great way to start up a conversation on night vision, why it’s important and how to improve it,” Johnston writes. “Scouts love hearing how pilots and soldiers use red light and might even be temporarily enticed into being ‘stealthy’ right before bed.”
    • Don’t drive through campsites at night. If you camp in your car, disable internal and external lighting that is usually automatically activated when a door opens.
    • Be aware of where your flashlight is pointed at all times. If you point it at someone’s tent when you walk by at night, reflective fabrics cause the whole tent to light up. This disturbs the sleep of the tent’s occupants.
  4. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners as a team head out to the designated area to look for the Scout Law.  Let them know that each of the 12 points of the Scout Law are out there and they are numbered.  You will know when you find it because it will glow red with you point your flashlight at it.
  5. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners go on the hunt and remind them to practice their flashlight etiquette.
My First Knot
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will learn about the square knot and attempt to tie it.

  • 3 ft. red paracord, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 3 ft. blue paracord, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
out The Adventure Activity Key click here.
  • 3 ft. red paracord, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 3 ft. blue paracord, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn how to tie a square knot by watching the “How to Tie a Square Knot”  video on Scout Life magazine.
  2. Practice tying the square knot using one red and one blue paracord and keep it tied as an example.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and tell them that they are going to learn about knots and rope.
  2. Tell the den that rope is a very useful item.  It can be used for pulling, fastening, attaching, carrying, and lifting.
  3. Inform the den that; “Rope was once a very expensive item to have, it took a lot of materials to make, and it had to be made by hand.  During this time knots were used to not only pull, fasten, attach, carry, or lift things but knots were created to attach rope together to make longer rope or to make rope shorter without cutting it.  Different knots are designed to do different things, but they all have something in common, when they are tied correctly, they are also easy to untie so the rope can be used again and again. One of the most basic needs is to make a longer piece of rope out of shorter pieces of rope.  This is done with a basic knot called the square knot or joining knot.”
  4. Hand out one piece of red and one piece of blue paracord to each Cub Scout and adult partner.
  5. Demonstrate how to tie a square knot then have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to practice.
  6. When checking to see if a square knot is tied properly you can tell by simply taking the two ends of rope on one side and the two ends of the other side and push them together, when you do this the knot will loosen.
Tent Time!
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scout and adult partners will practice setting up a tent.

  • Have Cub Scouts and adult partners bring the tent they will use for the campout.

Tip: If a Cub Scout family needs a tent see if you can help them secure one from another Scouting family.

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn how to set up a tent in this Scout Life magazine article, “How to Set Up a Tent.”
  2. Practice setting up your own tent and setting it up for display at the den meeting location.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians that they need to bring the tent they will use for the campout to the den meeting to set it up.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and tell them that at the den meeting, they will practice setting up their own tent.
  2. Review the basic steps to setting up a tent.
    • At the campsite, choose a level spot that drains well.
    • Remove stones and sticks, but don’t disturb the natural ground cover.
    • Always look for signs of creepy critters.
    • Spread out your tent’s footprint, or a ground cloth, to protect the tent floor from moisture, sharp objects and dirt.
    • Unfold the tent on top of the footprint. Pull out the corners of the floor and stake them to the ground, then assemble the poles and put them in place.
    • Use taut line hitches to tie the free ends of guylines around stakes you’ve pushed into the ground and pull the lines tight.
    • Put a rain fly over the tent and stake it down.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners work together to set up their tent.
Attend a council or district Cub Scout overnight camp or attend a campout with your pack.
Council Camping Tiger
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Go camping at your local council camp.

Tip: Cub Scout families may participate in Council Organized Family Camp.  These events may be called something less formal such as Parent and Pal or Cub Family Camp.  The program is provided by the local council and the event may last two nights.  For these activities, you are not required to have a BALOO-trained leader attend, but it is recommended.

Tigers must have a parent or legal guardian with them to go camping.

Before camping:

  1. Find a council camp on your local council’s website and sign up
  2. Determine what items you will need to take.

Go camping!

Pack Camping Tiger
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Go camping with your pack.

Tip: Be sure and have fun activities for Cub Scouts to do while camping. Consider working on an Adventure such as Tigers in the Wild, Fish On, or Sky is the Limit.

Tigers must have a parent or legal guardian with them to go camping.

A Tiger den may not go camping as a den. This activity is designed to be conducted as a pack campout. 

Before camping:

  1. With your pack, locate a campground that is suitable for Cub Scouts and make a reservation.
  2. Determine what items you will need to take. This includes meals, sleeping arrangements, and activities for the Cub Scouts.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Review Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities before camping.

When camping:

  • BALOO training is mandatory for a MINIMUM OF ONE adult on a pack overnighter.  BALOO training consists of an online pre-requisite component in addition to an overnight hand on practical. BSA’s Cub Scout level camping policies will be taught along with the discovery of the necessary tools to help units carry out a successful camping experience.
  • Complete the on-line training “Hazardous Weather” training module that is part of the Position Specific Training for den leaders my.scouting.  If you have already completed den leader, Cubmaster, or pack committee chair training on-line, then you have completed this module.
  • Watch the Weather Related Safety Moment video (1 minute 48 seconds).
  • Review Guide to Safe Scouting for camping,
  • If building a campfire, review Behavior Around Campfires.

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