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Let’s Camp Wolf

Elective Adventure

You are about to go on an overnight campout. Sleeping in a tent, roasting marshmallows, and exploring nature are some of the best parts of being a Cub Scout. Before you go, make a list of what you need to bring. Your den leader and parent(s) will help you get ready. Each time you go camping, you can show you are a Wolf Scout by doing more on your own.

Requirements

Learn about the buddy system and how it works in the outdoors. 
Buddy Calls
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts find their buddy using animal sounds.

  • Buddy Calls cards found in Additional Resources
  • Hat or bowl

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Buddy System by watching this video “The Buddy System.”
  2. Print and cut out Buddy Calls cards, one set for every two Cub Scouts.
  3. Select the number of animals that are needed for your den. You will need one set of animals for every two Cub Scouts. For example, if you have eight Cub Scouts you will need both pictures of four animals.
  4. Fold up the pieces of paper and place them in a hat or bowl.
  5. If you have an odd number of Cub Scouts, print one additional animal of the animals you’ve selected to create a three-person buddy group.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and say: “The buddy system is when two Cub Scouts work together, share, and keep each other safe. The den leader decides how buddies are paired. If there is an odd number of Cub Scouts, you can have a buddy group of no more than three.   Having a buddy is especially important when you are doing an activity outdoors, particularly near or on the water.   When you have a buddy, you are not to let your buddy out of your sight. As buddies you are friends, so remember the points of the Scout Law to be friendly, courteous, and kind to each other. You keep each other safe by following any rules or instructions for the activity”
  2. To pick our buddies we are going to pick a piece of paper out of this bowl.  Each piece of paper has an animal on it.  You will do your best to make the sound of that animal.  You will find your buddy who is making the sound of the same animal.
  3. Ask each Cub Scout to pick one piece of paper out of the bowl/hat.
  4. Without showing other Cub Scouts their paper, ask Cub Scouts to make the sound of the animal on their piece of paper.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to listen for their matching call to find their buddy.

Buddy Calls cards

Buddy Walk
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn buddy teamwork during this relay game.

  • One neckerchief for every two Cub Scouts
  • Masking tape

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Buddy System by watching this video “The Buddy System.” Determine the best location for the relay race.
  2. Mark the starting and finish line with masking tape
  3. Set up an area 20 yards long, free of obstacles for Cub Scouts to run a buddy race.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and say: “The buddy system is when two Cub Scouts work together, share, and keep each other safe. The den leader decides how buddies are paired. If there is an odd number of Cub Scouts, you can have a buddy group of no more than three.   Having a buddy is especially important when you are doing an activity outdoors, particularly near or on the water.   When you have a buddy, you are not to let your buddy out of your sight. As buddies you are friends, so remember the points of the Scout Law to be friendly, courteous, and kind to each other. You keep each other safe by following any rules or instructions for the activity”
  2. Have Cub Scouts form a single line.  Ask them to number off, one, two. This will form the buddy pair.
  3. Cub Scouts will have to hold on to a neckerchief as buddies race to the finish line.
  4. If there is an odd number of Cub Scouts, have one team of three.
  5. Line up the buddy groups on the starting line and have them race toward the finish line.
  6. They must work together and not let go of the neckerchief or fall.  If they let go or fall, they must return to the starting line and start over.
  7. The first buddy team to cross the finish line wins.
Know the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
Cub Scout Six Essentials Kim’s Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Play Kim’s game and learn the Cub Scout Six Essentials.

  • Camping Items Memory Game worksheet found in Additional Resources
  • Pencils (one for each Cub Scout)
  • Miscellaneous items such as a toy car, a rubber ducky, a book, a poncho, a sock
  • Blanket
  • Timer
  • Filled water bottle
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle
  • Flashlight
  • Sun protection
  • Trail food

Tip: You may include different types of the same essential.  For example, different types of flashlights and trail food.

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Camping Items Memory Game worksheet, one for each Cub Scout.
  2. Place all items on a table and cover with the blanket.
  3. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching this video “The Six Essentials.” Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials in the front of the Wolf handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and tell them that the Cub Scout Six Essentials are the six things they should have with them when they go on an outdoor adventure either in Cub Scouting or when they are with their family.  After learning about the Cub Scout Six Essentials, you will play a game to see what they have learned.
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials with the Cub Scouts using the Cub Scout Six Essentials chapter in the Wolf handbook.
  3. Hand out a pencil and Let’s Camp 2 Camping Items Memory Game worksheet to each Cub Scout.
  4. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be shown a bunch of items. They will need to remember the items.
  5. Invite Cub Scouts to stand by the covered table and remind them that they need to look and remember the items and not to touch the items.
  6. Lift the blanket.
  7. Set a timer for 3 minutes to allow Cub Scouts to look at the items.
  8. After three minutes, cover the items with the blanket.
  9. Ask Cub Scouts to write down all the items that they remember.
  10. Allow them five minutes to complete their list.
  11. Uncover the table to display the items.
  12. Talk through each item and discuss whether it’s important for a camping trip.
  13. Identify the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  14. The Cub Scout who remembered the most items is the winner.

Camping Items Memory Game worksheet

Make A Cub Scout Six Essential Kit
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts create their own Cub Scout Six Essentials kit.

This activity is designed if the pack is providing the Cub Scouts with their Cub Scout Six Essentials.  You can modify this activity by not providing the Cub Scout Six Essentials, but by having Cub Scouts bring their six essentials and reviewing with them the purpose of each item.

If providing trail food, make sure to check for food allergies or restrictions. 

  • Make a Cub Scout Six Essentials Kit signs found in Additional Resources
  • Tape
  • A day bag, one for each Cub Scout with their name written on it
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials, one for each Cub Scout
    • Filled water bottle
    • First aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun protection: hats, sunblock, and/or sunglasses
    • Trail food

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching this video “The Six Essentials.”
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials in the front of the Wolf handbook.
  3. Print one set of the Cub Scout Six Essentials Kit signs.
  4. Set up six tables in your meeting space. Tape one kit sign to each table.
  5. Each table will be a station that will have the appropriate Cub Scout Six Essential for each Cub Scout to take and place in their day bag as they learn about the Six Essentials at that table.  Then they move on to the next table to learn about the next six essentials and place it in their day bag until each of the Six Essentials has been covered.
  6. Ask den chief and adults to help with each of the stations.

During the meeting:

  1. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be building their Cub Scout Six Essentials kit for an upcoming outing.
  2. Gather the Cub Scouts into a circle and sit down and hand out the day bag for each Cub Scout
  3. Start at the first table with the water bottles.  Tell the Cub Scouts that they must always carry water with you when you are going outside. Your body loses water all the time, and you must replace it. When it is hot outside, your body loses water by sweating, and when it is cold outside, your body loses water with every breath you take; when you can see your breath when it is cold outside, that is water your body has lost. When your body has lost too much water, your body will tell you in different ways. The first is that you will feel thirsty. If you don’t drink water, you may get a headache. If you continue to not listen to your body, you may end up getting a stomachache. When outside, it is best to get in the habit of drinking water before you start, continuously drinking small amounts throughout your activity, and drinking when you are finished. Do not drink a lot of water at a time. It is best to drink small amounts a lot of times than to drink a large amount all at once. How do you know if you’re drinking enough water? One way is by checking your urine (pee). Your urine should be clear and light. If it’s yellow, your body could use more water. If it’s dark yellow, your body needs more water. Plastic water bottles are the most popular way to carry water. These come in all shapes and sizes. When looking at plastic water bottles, you want to think about how you will carry the bottle and how much water it will hold. Another important part of a plastic water bottle is how you drink from it. Some have straws, some have a valve, and others have just an opening with a screw cap. Water bladders are carried in backpacks. These are useful as they make drinking water easy and include a place to carry your other Cub Scout essentials. It is best to keep only water in your water bottle or water bladder and make sure to wash it after each use.
  4. The second table should be the first-aid kits.  Tell the Cub Scouts that there are different kinds of first-aid kits. The one you carry should be small and simple. Your first-aid kit should include things you know how to use and may need, based on the activity. Always check your first-aid kit before going out to make sure it has what you need. Your first-aid kit should have the following items:
    • Personal medical items, for example, if you are allergic to bee stings, you may need to carry an EpiPen
    • Pads to clean cuts before applying an adhesive bandage
    • First-aid cream applied to a cut before putting on an adhesive bandage
    • Adhesive bandages only a few in two or three different sizes

    As you learn more about first aid, you will begin to carry more items in your kit.

  5. The next table should be the whistle.  Tell the Cub Scouts that a whistle is for emergencies if you get separated from your group. Since most whistles are small, you may want to tie a string to it and attach it to your belt or your backpack. If you get separated from your group, use the SAW method of Stay, Answer, and Whistle.
  6. The next table should be the flashlight. Tell the Cub Scouts that a flashlight is one of the six essentials because like a first-aid kit and whistle, it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. There are a lot of options for a flashlight. When looking at different flashlights, remember that you must carry it. There are some you carry in your hands, some that you wear on your head, and even some that you wear around your neck. The next thing to consider about your flashlight is how it is powered. What type of batteries does it use? Do the batteries come with a flashlight? Is it easy to replace the batteries? When using your flashlight, remember to keep it pointed down and not at someone’s face.
  7. The next table should be sun protection.  Tell the Cub Scouts that just like when they need water when it is hot or cold outside, you need sun protection in all types of weather. You can protect yourself from the sun by wearing the appropriate clothing and using sunblock. Sunblock and some clothes will indicate what sun protection factor, or SPF, will provide. The higher the SPF number, the more protection it will provide. The SPF number is not related to how long you can stay out in the sun. The effect the sun has on your skin can be different based on the time of year, time of day, and type of skin you have. A hat to provide good sun protection should cover not only your head, but also your ears and neck. If your hat doesn’t cover your ears or neck, make sure to apply sunblock to those areas. When using sunblock, always follow the directions on the container. Know if your sunblock is waterproof or sweatproof. If not, you will need to reapply if you get wet or sweat a lot. Most sunblock will wear off, and you will need to apply more if you are outside for a longer period. Check the expiration date on your sunblock bottle.
  8. The next table should be trail food.  Tell the Cub Scouts that when they are outside and active, your body will need energy. Pack a snack that is easy to carry, is easy to eat when you are moving, and will stay fresh. Here are some ideas for trail food. GORP – Good Old Raisins and Peanuts was the first trail mix and was simply raisins and peanuts. Raisins provided sugar and peanuts provided protein, two important nutrients for energy. Trail mix is now much more than just raisins and peanuts. Dried fruits, chocolate candies, and other nuts are just some items you can find in trail mix. Dried meats like beef jerky and turkey jerky are another source of high-protein foods that make a good snack when outdoors. You can even find vegetarian jerky made from plant-based proteins. Granola can be simply rolled oats, nuts, and honey baked together. Like trail mix, granola can be made from different ingredients. You can find a variety of granola bars at your grocery store. When deciding on trail food, remember what the temperature will be like. If it is going to be warm outside, anything that has chocolate will melt, making it difficult to eat. If it is going to be 35 degrees or colder outside, you can consider packing cheese as your trail food. When planning what to bring for trail food, make sure to check with your den leader to see if anyone has a food allergy, so you can plan to avoid those foods.

Cub Scout Six Essentials Kit signs

In addition to your Cub Scout Six Essentials, list the personal items you need for your campout.
Packing Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scout teams pack a backpack for a camping trip.

Check for food allergies or dietary restrictions prior to this activity for the trail food.

  • Two backpacks
  • Two filled water bottles
  • Two first aid kits
  • Two brimmed hats
  • Two bottles of sunscreen
  • Two whistles
  • Two trail food bags
  • Two flashlights
  • Two sleeping bags
  • Two pillows
  • Two 1-gallon sealable bags with a set of extra clothes. (t-shirt, shorts, socks, underwear)
  • Two rain jackets or ponchos
  • Two mess kits or plates or bowls
  • Two tents
  • Two toothbrushes
  • Two bars of soap

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching this video “The Six Essentials.”
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials in the front of the Wolf handbook.
  3. Become familiar with the suggested Individual Campout Checklist for Pack Overnighter.
  4. Divide up the items into two piles. Each pile should have one of each the items.

During the meeting:

  1. Divide Cub Scouts into two teams.
  2. Explain the rules:
    • Cub Scouts are to take turns running to and from the table, picking up one item for their camping trip at a time.
    • When a Cub Scout has reached the table, they will choose one item to place into their team’s backpack and quickly explain why that item is important for the campout. If they get it correct the Cub Scout will run back to the group, and before the next person can run to get another item. The sleeping bag and tent may be placed next to the backpack.
  3. The team that packs all the items and correctly explains why it is important wins.
What Would You Bring?
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts determine what is a “need” or “want” for a campout.

  • Backpack  to fit all the items below
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials
    • Filled water bottle
    • First aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun protection
    • Trail food
  • ”Need” items
    • Sleeping Bag
    • Tent
    • Clothes
    • closed toe shoes
    • toothbrush and toothpaste
    • insect repellent
    • Warm jacket
    • Cub Scout uniform
  • Items “Want” items
    • Camera
    • Notebook and pencil
    • Fishing pole
    • Binoculars

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching this video “The Six Essentials.”
  2. Review the Cub Scout Six Essentials in the front of the Wolf handbook.
  3. Become familiar with the suggested Individual Campout Checklist for Pack Overnighter.
  4. Pack a backpack or canvas with the Cub Scout Six Essentials, items from the “need” list, items from the “want” list.

During the meeting:

  1. Show the Cub Scout the backpack or canvas bag.  Share with them that this is the type of bag that would be packed when going on a campout with the pack.
  2. Pull out each item one by one.  Ask the Cub Scouts if the item is a Six Essential, a needed item, or something they may want to bring but isn’t needed.
    • Call out items that are part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials and why they are essential.
    • Describe why the “need” items may be important to take.
    • Describe why the “want” items are nice but not needed
  3. Continue until everyone has an empty backpack.
Learn a camping skill.
Nothing But Knots
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn about square knots.

  • One piece of 20-inch rope with red duct tape on one end and blue duct tape on the other end for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn how to tie a square knot using the “How to Tie a Square Knot” video on Scout Life magazine.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and inform them that learning to tie knots is important.  Rope is an extremely helpful item on campouts.  Rope can be used to tie down tents or to create clotheslines to dry towels.  We use knots for different reasons.  Some knots can make the rope shorter, tie things down, bind poles together, or to connect two pieces together to make a longer piece of rope.  The important thing about knots is that when tied correctly they do the job, and they are easy to untie when done. That is what we are going to learn today.  One of the most basic knots is the square knot.  The square knot simply connects two pieces of rope together, it works best with the rope is the same type and size.  It holds the two pieces together but when you want to separate them it is easy to untie.
  2. Hand out a rope to each Cub Scout.
  3. While teaching the Cub Scouts to tie the square knot, demonstrate with your own rope.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to hold the red end in the right hand and the blue end in the left hand.
  5. Pass the red end over and under the rope with the blue end.
  6. Pass the red end rope now in your left hand over and under the blue end now in your right.
  7. Tighten the knot by pulling both running ends at the same time.
  8. Demonstrate that if they tie the knot correctly you can simply squeeze the knot together and it will loosen up and make it easy to untie.
Stuff Sack Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts will learn about storing their sleeping bags in this fast-paced relay.

  • Two sleeping bags
  • Two sleeping bag stuff sacks
  • Masking tape

Before the meeting:

  1. Read “How to Buy the Best Sleeping Bag” in Scout Life magazine.
  2. Read “How to clean and care for your sleeping bag” in Scout Life magazine.
  3. Become how a sleeping bag works.
    • Sleeping bags use trapped air to keep you warm.  Trapped air is one of the best insulators.
    • Your body provides the heat for sleeping bags to keep you warm.
    • Sleeping bags must be kept dry, wet sleeping bags will remove body heat and may cause loss of body heat which can lead to hypothermia in very cold conductions.
    • A sleeping bag will last longer if after a campout you let it air out for a day and then place it loosely in a large stuff sack.
  4. Set up a start and finish line using masking tape.
  5. Lay out a stuff sack and the sleeping bag on the finish line.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scout and review how to clean and care for your sleeping bag from the Scouting Magazine article.
  2. Share with Cub Scouts how sleeping bags work.
  3. Describe to the Cub Scouts how the relay race will work.
  4. Divide Cub Scouts into two teams and form a line.
  5. Tell Cub Scouts that they will run down and stuff the sleeping bag into the stuff sack, pull the drawstring as quickly as possible and run back and tag their next teammate.
  6. The second Cub Scout will run down and unstuff the sleeping bag and lay it next to the stuff sack. Once complete, they will run back to their team and tag the next Cub Scout in line.
  7. Play continues until all Cub Scouts have had a turn.
  8. The team with the fastest time wins.

Tip: When selecting a sleeping bag for camping a good rule of thumb is that if it has a cartoon character on it, there is a good chance it isn’t going to work for camping.  Those sleeping bags are designed for indoor use.

Attend a council or district Cub Scout overnight camp or attend a campout with your pack.
Council Camping Wolf
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Go camping at your local council camp.

Tip: Cub Scout families may participate in Council Organized Family Camp.  These events may be called something less formal such as Parent and Pal or Cub Family Camp.  The program is provided by the local council and the event may last two nights.  For these activities, you are not required to have a BALOO-trained leader attend, but it is recommended.

Before camping:

  1. Find a council camp on your local council’s website and sign up
  2. Determine what items you will need to take.

Go camping!

Pack Camping Wolf
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Go camping with your pack.

Tip: Be sure and have fun activities for Cub Scouts to do while camping.  Consider working on an Adventure such as Paws on the Path, A Wolf Goes Fishing, or Finding Your Way.

A Wolf Den may not go camping as a den.  This activity is designed to be conducted as a Pack Campout. 

Before camping:

  1. With your pack, locate a campground that is suitable for Cub Scouts and make a reservation.
  2. Under the direction of the BALOO-trained leader develop a schedule for the campout including activities, Adventure requirements, and meals.
  3. Determine what items you will need to take.
  4. Distribute information to your den about time, date, location, and packing list.
  5. Remind parents that a parent or legal guardian must attend with their Cub Scout.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Review Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities before camping.

When camping:

  • Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO) training is mandatory for a pack overnighter. At least one registered adult leader who will be present during the overnighter must complete BALOO training.  BALOO training consists of an online pre-requisite component in addition to an overnight hand on practical. BSA’s Cub Scout level camping policies will be taught along with the discovery of the necessary tools to help units carry out a successful camping experience.   Check with your local council when the next available BALOO Training will be conducted.
  • Complete the on-line training “Hazardous Weather” training module that is part of the Position Specific Training for den leaders my.scouting.  If you have already completed den leader, Cubmaster, or pack committee chair training on-line, then you have completed this module.
  • Watch the Weather Related Safety Moment video (1 minute 48 seconds).
  • Review Guide to Safe Scouting for camping.
  • If building a campfire, review Behavior Around Campfires.

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