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On A Roll – Lion

Elective Adventure

With their family or den, Lions learn bike safety and go on a bike ride.  Bikes, training wheels, tricycles, and bikes of all forms are welcome. 

Requirements

With your den or Lion adult partner, learn about the safety gear you should use while riding a bicycle.
Checking My Gear Before I Ride
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts check their own safety gear. 

  • Each Cub Scout and adult partner brings their own bike helmet and any other safety bike gear 
  • For those who don’t have their own bike helmet coordinate bike helmets to borrow 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Become familiar with the proper fitting of a bike helmet by reviewing Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website.  
  2. Prepare meeting location to allow plenty of space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to try on their bike helmets and lay out their safety gear. 
  3. If the meeting location differs from your normal den meeting, time, date, or location inform Cub Scouts, adult partners, parents, and legal guardians of the changes.  
  4. The day before the meeting remind everyone in the den of the date, time, and location, and to bring their helmets and to wear what they would wear on a bike ride. 
  5. If anyone is going to borrow a helmet, disinfect the helmet with an over-the-counter disinfectant spray. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and inform them that when we ride bikes wearing a helmet is one of the most important safety gear we have.  A bicycle crash can happen at any time. A properly fitted bicycle helmet reduces the risk of head injury. More children aged 5 to 14 go to hospital emergency rooms for injuries associated with bicycles than with any other sport. Many of these injuries involve the head.  
  2. Just like any safety gear, in order for it to work properly you have to wear it properly.   
  3. Demonstrate to know that your bike helmet is fitted properly and if it doesn’t how to adjust it. 
    • Your helmet should fit snuggly. While it is sitting flat on top of your head, make sure the helmet doesn’t rock side to side. Sizing pads come with new helmets; use the pads to securely fit to your head. Mix or match the sizing pads for the greatest comfort. In your child’s helmet, remove the padding when your child’s head grows. If the helmet has a universal fit ring instead of sizing pads, adjust the ring size to fit the head. 
    • The helmet should sit level on your head and low on your forehead—one or two finger-widths above your eyebrow. 
    • Center the left buckle under the chin. On most helmets, the straps can be pulled from the back of the helmet to lengthen or shorten the chin straps. This task is easier if you take the helmet off to make these adjustments. 
    • Adjust the slider on both straps to form a “V” shape under, and slightly in front of,  the ears.  Lock the  slider if possible. 
    • Buckle your chin strap. Tighten the strap until it is snug, so that no more than one or two fingers fit under the strap. 
    • Does your helmet fit right? Open your mouth wide…big yawn! The helmet should pull down on the head. If not, refer back to step 5 and tighten the chin strap. B.  Does your helmet rock back more than two fingers above the eyebrows? If so, unbuckle, shorten the front strap by moving the slider forward.  Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. C.  Does your helmet rock forward into your eyes? If so, unbuckle, tighten the back strap by moving the slider back toward the ear. Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. D.  Roll the rubber band down to the buckle. All four straps must go through the rubber band and be close to the buckle to prevent the buckle from slipping. 
  4. Have each Cub Scout and adult partner try on their bike helmet and check to make sure it is fitted properly and if not, make necessary adjustments.  
Follow the Dots To Safety Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Reinforce introduction to bike safety gear with a dot-to-dot activity.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 53 
  • Crayons, enough to share 
  • Den leader or the adult leading the activity brings their own bike helmet 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Review the material in “During the meeting” for bike safety gear. 
  2. Prepare the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and inform them that when we ride bikes wearing a helmet is one of the most important safety gear we have.  A bicycle crash can happen at any time. A properly fitted bicycle helmet reduces the risk of head injury. More children aged 5 to 14 go to hospital emergency rooms for injuries associated with bicycles than with any other sport. Many of these injuries involve the head.  
  2. Just like any safety gear, in order for it to work properly you have to wear it properly.   
  3. Demonstrate to know that your bike helmet is fitted properly and if it doesn’t how to adjust it. 
    • Your helmet should fit snuggly. While it is sitting flat on top of your head, make sure the helmet doesn’t rock side to side. Sizing pads come with new helmets; use the pads to securely fit to your head. Mix or match the sizing pads for the greatest comfort. In your child’s helmet, remove the padding when your child’s head grows. If the helmet has a universal fit ring instead of sizing pads, adjust the ring size to fit the head. 
    • The helmet should sit level on your head and low on your forehead—one or two finger-widths above your eyebrow. 
    • Center the left buckle under the chin. On most helmets, the straps can be pulled from the back of the helmet to lengthen or shorten the chin straps. This task is easier if you take the helmet off to make these adjustments. 
    • Adjust the slider on both straps to form a “V” shape under, and slightly in front of,  the ears.  Lock the  slider if possible. 
    • Buckle your chin strap. Tighten the strap until it is snug, so that no more than one or two fingers fit under the strap. 
  4. Additional safety gear includes wearing the proper shoes.  Shoes should fit so they don’t slip. Laces should be tied closely to avoid getting caught in the bike chain. 
  5. Wearing bike gloves will help when you are learning to ride.  The gloves will protect your hands when you fall. 
  6. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to complete the activity on page 53 of the Lion handbook. 
With your den or Lion adult partner, learn the safety rules to follow when riding a bicycle.
Cut and Paste Bike Rules
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Review safety rules for bike riding.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 51 
  • Crayons, enough to share 
  • Craft scissors, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Glue sticks, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting: 

  1. If you have not already done so, become familiar with the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.   
  2. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity in the Lion handbook on page 51. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and review the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.   
  2. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners complete the activity in the Lion handbook on page 51. 
With your Lion adult partner or family, ride a bicycle wearing appropriate safety gear and follow safety rules.
Let’s Roll Lions
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Take a bike ride with your den.

  • Cub Scouts and adult partners bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials 
  • Cub Scouts and adult partners bring their own bike, bike helmet, and other safety gear 
  • For those who do not have their own bike or bike helmet arrange for bikes and helmets to be borrowed 
  • Activity Consent Form 

Check with your Pack and other den leader to see if they are planning a bike ride so you can coordinate efforts. 

Before the meeting: 

  1. If you have not already done so, become familiar with the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.   
  2. Identify a bike bath that is away from traffic.   
  3. A week before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the meeting and that everyone will need to bring their bike, safety gear, and Cub Scout Six Essentials.  
  4. The day before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the meeting and that everyone will need to bring their bike, safety gear, and Cub Scout Six Essentials.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and review the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.   
  2. Make sure everyone to a bike safety gear check using the ABC’s and that their bike helmets are fitted properly. 
  3. Explain the bike route and make sure everyone stays together. 
  4. Go on your bike ride. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before starting this Adventure: 

During the Adventure: 

  • Conduct an “ABC Quick Check” on the bicycles before riding.  The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center has a checklist for air, brakes, and cranks, chain, and cogs. 
  • If conducting a bike ride away from your regular meeting location make sure to have everyone complete an Activity Consent form.  

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