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Paws For Action

Required Adventure

This Adventure is about America and the powerful symbols that represent the best of our country and how communities come together to help solve problems they are facing.  Citizenship in America is about participation.  One way to show citizenship is by making an impact locally through nonprofit organizations.  Nonprofit organizations are a place for people to give their time, talents, and resources to make a difference in their community.  You, too, can make an impact by participating in a service project that makes your community a better place.

Requirements

Familiarize yourself with the flag of the United States of America including the history, demonstrating how to raise and lower the flag, how to properly fold and display, and the United States etiquette.
Outdoor Flag Ceremony
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Learn about flag etiquette and how to work with a flag while playing a flag trivia game.

  • Citizenship Flag Trivia game  found in Additional Resources
  • Citizenship Flag Trivia key found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencil for each Cub Scout
  • United States  flag, one for every three Cub Scouts
  • Flagpole with working halyard, the rope that the United States   Flag attaches two
  • United States  flag that is fitted for the above flagpole
  • Cub Scout Opening Flag Ceremony found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Print a copy of the Citizenship Flag Trivia game for each Cub Scout.
  2. Ensure access to the answer key, either by printing or digitally.
  3. Review the flag ceremonies video (Duration: 1:30).
  4. Learn how to display and fold the United States  flag. Check out the video on the Scout Life website “How to Display and Fold the American Flag.”
  5. Print Cub Scout Opening Flag Ceremony and Cub Scout Closing Flag Ceremony.
  6. Practice the proper way of folding the United States flag

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and inform them that in this den meeting, they will learn about the United States flag and how to properly display, fold, how to raise and lower it.
  2. Tell the Cub Scouts that we treat the flag with respect because the flag symbolizes freedom and justice.  People have made great sacrifices, and many have even given their lives to provide us with the freedoms we enjoy today.  Treating the flag with respect shows you believe in freedom and justice.
  3. Have Cub Scouts break off into groups of two or three.
  4. Provide a Citizenship Flag Trivia game sheet and pencil to each Cub Scout.
  5. Inform the Cub Scouts that they are to work together and use their Bear Cub Scout handbook to answer the questions on the trivia sheet.
  6. After Cub Scouts have finished, review the correct answers.
  7. Gather the Cub Scouts and with the help of the Den Chief, Denner, or Assistant Den Leader demonstrate how to fold the United States flag.
  8. Pair the Cub Scouts into groups of three and give each group a United States flag.  Have the groups practice folding the United States flag properly.
  9. Once the groups have properly folded the flag, gather the Cub Scouts around the flagpole.
  10. With the help of two Cub Scouts demonstrate how to properly raise and lower the United States flag.  When raising the flag, it is done quickly and when lowering the flag, it is done slowly.

Citizenship Flag Trivia game

Citizenship Flag Trivia key

Patriotic Guest Speaker
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Learn about the United States flag and how it’s used from a local patriot.

Before the meeting:

  1. Select a community organization that could present information on the United States  flag and how to properly display the flag.  Organizations that you may consider are the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), the American Legion, or a high school Jr. ROTC instructor.
  2. Request a person from the community to visit your den meeting to talk about the history of the United States flag and how to properly display it.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and inform them that in this den meeting, they will learn about the United States flag and how to properly display, fold, how to raise and lower it.
  2. Remind Cub Scouts to be on their best behavior and to raise their hands if they have a question.
  3. Welcome your guest speaker and introduce them to the den.
  4. Gather the Cub Scouts and with the help of the Den Chief, Denner, or Assistant Den Leader demonstrate how to fold the United States flag.
  5. Pair the Cub Scouts into groups of three and give each group a United States flag.  Have the groups practice folding the United States flag properly.
  6. Once the groups have properly folded the flag, gather the Cub Scouts around the flagpole.
  7. With the help of two Cub Scouts demonstrate how to properly raise and lower the United States flag.  When raising the flag, it is done quickly and when lowering the flag, it is done slowly.

After the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to sign a thank you card for your guest speaker.
  2. Send a thank you card to the guest speaker.
Identify 3 symbols that represent the United States. Pick your favorite and make a model, work of art, or other craft that depicts the symbol.
Paint The Flag
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Paint a picture of the United States  flag.

  • Watercolor paints
  • Paintbrush for each Cub Scout
  • Paper for each Cub Scout
  • ​​​Bear handbook
  • Waterproof covering for the workspace
  • Plastic cup for every two Cub Scouts
  • Water

Before the meeting:

  1. Remind Cub Scouts to bring their handbook to the meeting.
  2. Cover workspace with waterproof covering.
  3. Place one piece of paper, a watercolor set, and a paintbrush at each workspace.
  4. Place a cup of water in between two workspaces.

During the meeting:

  1. Discuss with Cub Scouts symbols that represent the United States.
  2. If Cub Scouts are struggling with ideas, have them consider:
    • Eagle
    • Liberty Bell
    • Statue of Liberty
    • National Anthem
    • Uncle Sam
    • White House
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to paint a picture of the United States flag.
  4. Remind Cub Scouts that a picture of the flag is in their Bear handbook.
Statue Of Liberty
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Learn about the Statue of Liberty while building a replica.

  • Statue of Liberty template found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Toilet paper roll, one for each Cub Scout
  • Colored pencils
  • Scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • Clear tape
  • Covering for workspace

Before the meeting:

  1. Cover the workspace with a covering.
  2. Print one copy of the Statue of Liberty template for each Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be building their own Statue of Liberty.
  2. Hand out colored pencils, a pair of scissors, a toilet paper roll, and a Statue of Liberty sheet to each Cub Scout.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to color the toilet paper roll and the pieces on the Statue of Liberty Sheet.
  4. Remind Cub Scouts to color the fire yellow or orange.
  5. Have a discussion while Cub Scouts paint about the Statue of Liberty such as:
    • Do they know which country gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States ? France.
    • Mention that the Statue of Liberty was given on July 4, 1884, as a birthday gift to the United States .
    • Did they know that the Statue of Liberty was shipped to the United States   in crates and rebuilt in New York.
    • Can they guess how tall the Statue of Liberty is? It stands 15 stories high without the pedestal. There are 354 steps to lookout from the 25 windows in the crown.
    • Discuss the seven points of Lady Liberty’s crown. Each point represents one of the seven continents and the seven seas.
    • Discuss how the torch represents the light that guides people to freedom. The tablet in her left hand is a replica of the one found at the base of the statue that bears the date of American  Independence – July 4, 1776.
  6. Ask Cub Scouts to cut out their pieces.
  7. Ask Cub Scouts to use their black pen to draw a face on their circle.
  8. Ask Cub Scouts to decorate the crown and tape the crown to the circle.
  9. Tape the yellow torch to the top of one of the rectangles to create the torch.
  10. Tell Cub Scouts to tape the face on the end of the toilet paper roll.
  11. Ask Cub Scouts to tape the rectangles to the side of the toilet paper roll making sure that the rectangle with the torch is higher than the other rectangle.

Statue of Liberty template

U.S.A. Symbol Model
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Using Play-Doh​​®, create a symbol that represents the United States.

  • Several containers of Play-Doh® in assorted colors, recommend at least 4 oz. or more for each Cub Scout
  • Bear handbook

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather supplies.
  2. Place a covering on the workspace where Cub Scouts will create their symbols.

During the meeting:

  1. Discuss with Cub Scouts symbols that represent the United States .  Use the Bear Handbook for guidance.
  2. If Cub Scouts are struggling with ideas, have them consider:
    • Eagle
    • Liberty Bell
    • Statue of Liberty
    • National Anthem
    • Uncle Sam
    • White House
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to select one symbol and create it with Play-Doh®.
  4. Once Cub Scouts complete their symbols, allow time to share their creations.
U.S.A. Symbols Drawing
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn about symbols that represent the United States and create a drawing of your favorite symbol.

  • Colored pencils
  • Paper, one sheet for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather supplies.

During the meeting:

  1. Discuss with Cub Scouts symbols that represent the United States .
  2. United States
  3. If Cub Scouts are struggling with ideas, have them consider:
    • Eagle
    • Liberty Bell
    • Statue of Liberty
    • National Anthem
    • Uncle Sam
    • White House
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to select one symbol and draw that symbol.
  5. Once Cub Scouts complete their symbols, allow time to share their drawings.
White House Model
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Learn about United States symbols and build a model of the White House.

  • Building materials such as Lego® or Lincoln Logs®
  • White House model found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Print one copy of the White House model for every 3 or 4 Cub Scouts so they can use it as a reference for building their model.

During the meeting:

  1. Set out the building materials.
  2. Discuss with Cub Scouts symbols that represent the United States .
  3. United States
  4. If Cub Scouts are struggling with ideas, have them consider:
    • Eagle
    • Liberty Bell
    • Statue of Liberty
    • National Anthem
    • Uncle Sam
    • White House
  5. Hand out the White House pictures and explain to Cub Scouts that they are going to use their materials to build a model of it.
  6. Ask Cub Scouts to select their materials and build a model of the White House.
  7. Once Cub Scouts complete their models, allow time to share their creations.
Learn about the mission of any non-profit. Find out how they fund their activities and how volunteers are used to help.
Groups That Help
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn about a nonprofit organization using the internet.

  • Computer, tablet, or mobile phone with internet access

Before the meeting:

  1. Notify Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians that you’ll be using the internet at this meeting to research a non-profit organization.

During the meeting:

  1. Tell Cub Scouts they’re going to learn about a nonprofit organization by researching it online.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to name some local nonprofit organizations. If Cub Scouts are having trouble, you can prompt them with these ideas:
    • Local food pantry
    • Animal shelter
    • American Legion
  3. Have Cub Scouts vote on the organization they would like to learn about.
  4. Find the organization’s website on your computer, tablet, or mobile phone.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts what they would like to know about the organization. You can prompt them with these ideas if necessary:
    • What does the organization do?
    • What group of people or cause does this organization serve?
    • How does it raise money?
    • What do their volunteers do to help?
  6. As Cub Scouts ask each question, find the page on the nonprofit’s website that answers the question.
  7. Ask a Cub Scout to read the answer to the group.
Nonprofit Visit
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts learn about a nonprofit by visiting the organization.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local nonprofit organization.
  2. Ask if the organization would be willing to host your Cub Scout den and have someone give them information about their activities. Schedule the meeting.
  3. Inform Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting space.
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions. Remind them to be respectful during the presentation.
  3. Have your host give the den a tour of their facility, if appropriate.

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the organization and send.
Participate in a service project.
Eyeglasses Donation Drive
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time5

With your den, host a used eyeglasses drive to donate to an organization that recycles them for those in need. 

  • Collection boxes or bins 
  • Paper  
  • Markers, colored pencils, or crayons  

Before Meeting 1:

  1. Find a local organization that accepts used eyeglasses.
  2. Decide on the date and duration for the eyeglasses drive.
  3. Ask the organization if they can have a member attend your den meeting to pick up the eyeglasses and set the date for the visit.

During Meeting 1:

  1. Have Cub Scouts create posters or flyers advertising the drive.
  2. Hang up your flyers or posters around the neighborhood, at school, and in other places where people will see them.
  3. With permission, set up collection boxes or bins in places where people can easily drop off donations, like schools, community centers, or local stores.

Before Meeting 2:

  1. Pick up donations from the collection boxes.

During Meeting 2:

  1. Have Cub Scouts sort the donated items into bags or boxes.
  2. Present the donations to the member of the organization who is attending your meeting.

Tip: The Lions Club usually has an eyeglasses drive.

Plant Trees
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List5
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts plant a tree in their community.

  • Shovels
  • Gardening gloves for each Cub scout
  • Accessible water (hose, watering can, bucket, etc.)
  • Tree saplings in pots
  • Activity Consent Form

Before the Meeting:

  1. Contact your school, Chartered Partner, or local government to ask if there is an opportunity for your den to plant a tree.
  2. Ask the organization where and when you should plant the tree.
  3. Inform Cub Scouts’ parents or legal guardians about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form. Ask them to bring shovels and gloves if they have them. Explain that their Cub Scouts will need to wear closed-toe shoes.
  4. Obtain tree saplings.

During the Meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to clear away rocks and debris from the spot where they will plant the tree.
  2. Have Cub Scouts take turns using the shovels to dig a hole that is two or three times the diameter of the pot and deep enough to hold the soil and roots.
  3. Tell Cub Scouts to remove the tree from the pot and place it in the hole.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to cover the roots with loose soil.
  5. Have Cub Scouts thoroughly soak the tree with water using the hose, watering can, or bucket.

After the Meeting:

  1. Work with Cub Scouts’ parent or legal guardian to create a watering schedule for at least two weeks after planting.
Scouting For Food Bear
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Participate in your Council-sponsored Scouting for Food event.

  • Activity Consent Form
  • Collection bags provide by local council
  • Vehicle to carry collected food such as a truck or van
  • Map of area to distribute bags and collect food donations
  • Check with local council for any additional items

Before the Meeting:

  1. Contact your local Council to participate in Scouting for Food collection event.
  2. Review council provided materials for Scouting for Food event.
  3. Communicate the details to the parents and legal guardians of your Cub Scouts.
  4. Distribute Activity Consent Form to the patrol.
  5. Confirm with local council the area to distribute bags and collect food donations.
  6. Confirm with local council the location of drop off for donations.
  7. Get collection bags provided by local council.
  8. Communicate date, time, and location for bag distribution to the patrol.
  9. Communicate date, time, and location for food collection distribution to the patrol.
  10. Refer to your council provided resources for any additional items to be completed before the event.

During collection bag distribution:

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout.
  2. Create buddies.
  3. Assign area for buddies to distribute collection bags.
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely as they distribute collection bags.
  5. Remind Cub Scouts that it is illegal to place collection bags in or on mailboxes.

During food donation collection:

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout.
  2. Create buddies.
  3. Assign area for buddies to collect donations.
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely if there is no donated food left out.
  5. Take donated food to the assigned collection point.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist  to plan your den or pack service project.
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects.

During the Adventure

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults.
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines.

Before starting this Adventure, review Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activities.

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