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Paws Of Skill

Elective Adventure

Sports and active games are great ways to have fun and be healthy. Sports teach you to work with a team, help others, and follow rules. You can use the Scout Oath and the Scout Law as guides when you are playing games and sports. 

In this Adventure, you’ll be challenged to exercise, play a team sport with your den, and show how to be a good sport. Time to move your powerful paws.

Requirements

With your den, discuss sportsmanship and what it means to be a good sport. Make the connection between sportsmanship and the Scout Oath and the Scout Law.
Playing With Honor
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Discuss sportsmanship and the connection to the Scout Oath and Law.

  • Access to Playing with Honor sheet found in Additional Resources

Before the meeting: 

  1. Review the Scout Oath and Law. 
  2. Review the Playing with Honor sheet. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Discuss with Cub Scouts the importance of being a good sport and the connection to the Scout Oath and Law. 
  2. Name a point of the Scout Law and how it relates to good sportsmanship.  Ask Cub Scouts to give an example of when they practiced good sportsmanship using that particular point of the Scout Law. 
  3. Allow each Cub Scout an opportunity to share a story, allowing one story per one Scout Law.

Playing with Honor sheet

The Graceful Competitor
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Share with den an example of a sports celebrity with good sportsmanship.

  • Access to The Graceful Competitor found in Additional Resources  
  • Research sports athlete known for their outstanding sportsmanship 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Choose a sports athlete known for their outstanding sportsmanship using the information found on the Graceful Competitor resource.  
  2. Collect information about the athlete’s career and specific instances where they displayed good sportsmanship. Identify any awards or recognition the athlete received for their character on and off the field.  
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to bring their own example of an athlete with good sportsmanship. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Share with Cub Scouts the specific traits that make the athlete a role model for sportsmanship.  
    • Be supportive. 
    • Have a positive attitude. 
    • Be respectful. 
    • Be willing to learn. 
    • Practice self-control. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts share their example of an athlete with good sportsmanship.  
  3. Encourage Cub Scouts to reflect on and share their own experiences with sportsmanship.

The Graceful Competitor

MasterClass™ article on “How to Show Good Sportsmanship: 5 Qualities of a Good Sport

Learn the rules of a team sport that you can play with your den, pack, family, or friends. After learning the rules, play the game for 30 minutes.
Basketball
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn about the rules of basketball and play a game. 

  • Basketball size 6 
  • Court size 74’ x 50’ 
  • Height of basket 9’ 
  • Distance of free-throw line 14’ 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the USA Basketball website and become familiar with the rules of youth basketball.  
  2. Keep the rules simple and if possible, adjust the height of the basketball hoop so Cub Scouts can compete. 
  3. Identify a basketball court that is free of hazards. 
  4. If the basketball court you are using is not at your regular meeting location, send a reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den about the date, time, and location of the den meeting. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adults and divide them into two teams, keeping adults together with their Cub Scouts.   
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Review the rules of basketball and how to score. 
    • Field goal are 2 points 
    • Free throw is 1 point 
    • No 3-point field goals 
  4.  A coin flip will determine the team that will start with the ball to mitigate significant differences in height and coordination among children. Alternating possession rules will then ensue throughout the game, Team awarded possession starts with throw-in at half court. 
  5. Only player-to-player defense. Double-team/crowding is not allowed. 
  6. Shot clock 
    •  30 seconds
    • Full 30 second reset on offensive and defensive rebounds
    • Full 30 second reset on any foul 
  7. The object of the game is to dribble the ball and shoot it into the basket. 
  8. The team with the most points wins. 
Coach And Cubs
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Invite a sports coach to your Cub Scout den meeting to teach the rules and basic skills of a sport.

  • Dependent on chosen sport

Before the meeting: 

  1. Two weeks before the den meeting, invite a sports coach from your community to your den meeting to teach the rules of a sport of their choice.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Discuss Cub Scout expectations when having a guest speaker: 
    • Raise hands 
    • No running around 
    • Listening ears 
  2. Allow the coach to teach the rules and give some basic skill demonstrations about the chosen sport.  
  3. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.  
  4. Have Cub Scouts play the game for 30 minutes with the help of the guest coach. 
  5. Thank your guest for coming. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Write a thank you note to the guest speaker. 
Kickball
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn about the rules of kickball and play a game.

  • 10-inch rubber kickball  
  • 4 baseball bases 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the World Kickball Association website and become familiar with the rules of kickball.  
  2. Keep the rules simple and adjust the distance of the kickball field so Cub Scouts can compete. 
  3. Identify a space clear of obstacles and hazards to lay out the kickball field. 
  4. Layout the kickball field using baseball bases. 
  5. If the kickball field you are using is not at your regular meeting location, send a reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den about the date, time, and location of the den meeting. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and divide them into two teams, keeping adult partners together with their Cub Scouts.   
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Review the rules to kickball and how to score, rules are like baseball. 
  4. To begin, one team will be in the outfield and the other will be the kicking team. 
  5. A member of the outfield team is the pitcher and begins the game by rolling the ball to the first kicker on the kicking team. 
  6. Once the kicker kicks the ball, they run around the bases in order. 
  7. If the ball lands in the foul zone, the kicker must try again, and the foul will count as a strike. 
  8. If the ball is caught without touching the ground the kicker is out. 
  9. When running bases, a kicker can be out if they are touched with the ball while it is in the hands of an opposing team member when they are off the base. 
  10. You may not throw the kickball at someone to get them out.  
  11. A team gets three outs before the team switches to the outfield. 
  12. The team with the most points wins.
Visit or watch a team sporting event with your family or den. Look for ways the team works together and share with your family or den.
Scouting In The Stands
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time3

Attend a sporting event and watch a live game.

Before the meeting: 

  1. Select a sporting event that is age-appropriate for the Cub Scouts. Consider factors like the length of the game, the nature of the sport, and the time of day. 
  2. Ask parents or legal guardians to complete and bring the activity consent form. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Clearly communicate to Cub Scouts the behavior expectations during the event. Remind them to be respectful, courteous, and attentive to the game. 
  2. Encourage the Cub Scouts to look for ways the team works together.  
  3. After the event, ask the Cub Scouts to share what they enjoyed and what they learned. 

Tip: If you are attending a high school or college event, contact the sports department to ask if Cub Scouts can get in for free or a reduced cost.  Check with your local council as many professional sports teams offer special Scout discounts or events. 

Tuning Into Team Spirit
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Watch a team sporting event on the television.

  • Television with access to a sports game

Before the meeting: 

  1. Decide on a sport that everyone in your den enjoys.  
  2. Arrange comfortable seating in front of the television, ensuring that everyone has a good view of the screen. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Take a moment to teach Cub Scouts about the teams playing, their key players, and any interesting facts about the game.  
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to look for ways the team works together.  
  3. After the game, ask Cub Scouts to share what they enjoyed and what they learned. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Review each Cub Scouts BSA Annual Health and Medical Record for any restrictions.

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