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Pick My Path – Lion

Elective Adventure

Through game play, Lions are exposed to the idea that choices have consequences.

Requirements

Explain that choices have consequences.
Catch a Lion by the Tic-Tac-Toe
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Play a game of Tic-Tac-Toe and discuss how choices have consequences in the game and in life.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, pages 57 and 59
  • Craft scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting location so Cub Scouts can work with adult partners to complete the activity on pages 57 and 59.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that being a Cub Scout means that we try to always do our best to live by the Scout Law.  Explain that in this activity they are going to play a game of tic-tac-toe.
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to complete the activity on pages 57 and 59.
  3. When completed have them play several games of tic-tac-toe.
  4. When everyone is finished playing ask the Cub Scouts, “What are the rules to tic-tac-toe?”
  5. Wait for an answer about not being able to take a turn back or that once you move you can’t move again.
  6. Make the connection that there are things that we do in our life that we cannot take back.  When we are mean to other people we can’t take that back.  When we lie, we can’t take that back.  The things we do we can’t take back, so it is important to always think about our actions before we do them. It is also important to think about what we are going to say before we say it.
You Can’t Put It Back
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Trying to put toothpaste back into the tube makes the connection that choices have consequences.

  • Travel size tube of toothpaste, one for each Cub Scout
  • Paper plates, one for each Cub Scout
  • Plastic spoons , one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1.  Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that being a Cub Scout means that we try to always do our best to live by the Scout Law.  Explain that in this activity they are going to play with toothpaste.
  2. Hand out the paper plates, spoons, and toothpaste to each Cub Scout.
  3. Have Cub Scouts squeeze the toothpaste out of the tube onto the paper plate, trying to get all of it out.
  4. Instruct the Cub Scouts to now try and put the toothpaste back in the tube using their spoon.
  5. Share with the Cub Scouts that the tube of toothpaste is like our mouth and the toothpaste are the words that come out of our mouth.  Once we say something, especially something that is hurtful, you can’t take those words back.
  6. Make the connection that there are things that we do in our life that we cannot take back.  When we are mean to other people we can’t take that back.  When we lie, we can’t take that back.  The things we do we can’t take back, so it is important to always think about our actions before we do them. It is also important to think about what we are going to say before we say it.
Perform a Good Turn for another person.
Lion Helping At Home
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scout does a chore at home.

  • This activity is done at home

At home:

  1. Have Cub Scouts talk with their parent or legal guardian about a chore they could help with at home.
  2. When they have done it have them share at the next den meeting what they did and how it helped.
Please, After You
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scout practices holding the door open for someone.

  • No extra supplies needed, just a door – assuming your meeting location has a door

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a door where Cub Scouts can practice opening the door for their adult partner.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask them what do they think the word courteous in the Scout Law means?  Allow Cub Scouts to give answers.
  2. Share that we can think of being courteous when we put the needs of others before our own needs.  For example, in this activity, we are going to practice opening the door for our adult partner.  You and your adult partner need to go through the door but by opening the door and allowing someone else to go first you are being courteous.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners go through the door with the Cub Scout opening the door for their adult partner.  Inform the Cub Scouts that you should let the person know that you will get the door for them by saying something like “Let me open the door for you.”  If they are carrying something you could say “You have your hands full let me open the door for you.”
You Look Marvelous
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts practice complementing each other.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Review some compliments that Cub Scouts can practice saying to each other.
    • You are brave.
    • You’re a great listener.
    • You have the best ideas.
    • You’re a great example to others.
    • I like being in Cub Scouts with you.
    • I am glad you are part of our den.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask them what do they think the word courteous in the Scout Law means?  Allow Cub Scouts to give answers.
  2. Share that we can think of being courteous when we put the needs of others before our own needs.  We are going to practice being courteous by putting other peoples feelings first by giving them a compliment.
  3. Give examples of compliments.
  4. Pair up Cub Scouts and have them give a compliment to one another then have them switch partners.  Continue switching until everyone has given and received a compliment from each member of the den.
Learn the basic rules of a game and play the game.
Guess What I Am
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn to play charades.

  • 3” x 5” index cards
  • Pen
  • A large bowl

Before the meeting:

  1. Be familiar with how to play charades by watching this YouTube video, “How to Play Charades.”
  2. Use the index cards to make the items that players will act out.
    • Playing basketball
    • Lion
    • Setting up a tent
    • Watching a movie
    • Swinging on a swing
    • Swimming
    • Fishing
    • Riding a bike
    • Eating a birthday cake
    • Going to sleep
    • Playing catch
    • Eating a bowl of cereal
  3. Place the index cards in the bowl.  This is where players will pick what they act out.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share how to play charades.
  2. Have Cub Scouts take turns explaining the rules to their adult partner.  Have the adult partner help the Cub Scout come up with the best way to explain the rules to someone else.
  3. Divide the den in half keeping Cub Scouts and their adult partners together.
  4. Play a game of charades.
Lion Rock, Paper, Scissors
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts play rock, paper, scissors.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Be familiar with how to play rock, paper, scissors by watching this YouTube video, “How to play Rock Paper Scissors.”

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share how to play rock, paper, scissors.
  2. Have Cub Scouts then explain the rules to their adult partner and then play exactly as they described the game.  Adult partners are to follow the rules that were described by the Cub Scout exactly, even if they are incorrect.  After playing, the adult partner helps the Cub Scout come up with the best way to explain the rules to someone else.
  3. Conduct a rock, paper, scissors tournament.
Musical Hula Hoops™
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts play musical Hula Hoops™.

  • 20” diameter Hula Hoops™, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Smart device connected to the internet with a speaker

Before the meeting:

  1. Be familiar with how to play musical chairs, instead of using chairs players will have to step inside a Hula Hoop™ on the ground:
    • Place the Hula Hoops™ on the ground in a circle with one less Hula Hoop™ then players.
    • Start the music and have the players walk clockwise in a circle around the Hula Hoops™.
    • Stop the music suddenly, and all players need to stand in an empty Hula Hoop™.
    • One person will be left standing without a Hula Hoop™, and they will be out of the game.
    • Another Hula Hoop™ is then removed.
    • The game continues until only one person is standing in a Hula Hoop™.
    • That person is the winner of the game.
  2. Find a safe location free of obstacles to set up the Hula Hoops™ for the game.
  3. Check you are able to connect to the internet with your smart device and connect to the Cub Scout Song Book on SoundCloud.
  4. Check the sound is clear for the playing area.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share how to play musical Hula Hoops™.
  2. Have Cub Scouts take turns explaining the rules to their adult partner.  Have the adult partner help the Cub Scout come up with the best way to explain the rules to someone else.
  3. Play musical Hula Hoops™.  Use the Cub Scout Song book, most songs are just the right length for a round.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

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