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Rolling Tigers

Elective Adventure

With their family or den, Tigers learn bike safety and go on a bike ride.  Bikes, training wheels, tricycles, and bikes of all forms are welcome.

Requirements

Learn the ABC’s of bike gear (air, brakes, chain.)
Talk With A Pro
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time5

A guest speaker who is an expert in cycling demonstrates the ABC’s of bike gear.

  •  Cub Scouts will need their Tiger Handbook, page 47
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout

When securing a guest speaker consider asking them to also cover requirements 2, 3, and 4.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a guest speaker who is an expert in cycling.  A local bike shop employee or owner or a cycling club.  Ask if they would be willing to come to your den meeting and talk with the Cub Scouts and adult partners about the ABC’s of bike gear.
  2. Check to make sure they are familiar with that term and if not explain to them you would like them to bring a bike and demonstrate how to check the air in the tires and how to take care and repair tires, how to check the brakes, and how to check the chain, crank, and cogs.
  3. Confirm the date, time, and location with the guest speaker.
  4. Set up a space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity in the Tiger Handbook, page 47.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and introduce the guest speaker.
  2. Have the guest speaker demonstrate the ABC’s of bike gear.
    • A is for Air.  Check the air pressure in the tires and check to the tires to make sure they are not worn out.
    • B is for Brakes.  If the bike has coaster brakes (brakes that stop the bike by peddling backward) check the brakes by placing the bike upside down and using your hand to peddle the bike forward and then spin the peddle backward to stop the wheel.  If the bike has hand brakes make sure that the levers don’t hit the handlebars when squeezed. Lift one end of the bike at a time to spin the wheel and apply the brake to see if the tire stops. Check to see that the brake pads are clean, and straight, and make contact with the tire rims properly.
    • C is for Crank, Chain, and Cogs.  Check the crankarm and try to wiggle it, there should be no movement.  The crankarm is what the peddles are attached to.  The bike chain should look like metal, there should be no rust or gunk on the chain.  The chain should not sag and should drive the back wheel.  If the bike has gears check to make sure the chain easily moves from cog to cog.  All moving parts should be properly lubricated with bike chain lubrication.
  3. Give Cub Scouts and adult partners the opportunity to ask questions.
  4. Ask for suggestions on potential bike paths to complete requirement 5.
  5. After the guest speaker, gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them work on the activity on page 47 of the Tiger Handbook to properly label the parts of a bike.
The ABC’s Of Bike Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts and adult partners will learn about the ABC’s of bike gear using an example bike.

  • Cub Scouts will need to bring their Tiger Handbook
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • A bike that has coaster breaks
  • A bike that has hand breaks
  • Bicycle air pump
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Bike chain lubrication

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the ABC’s of bicycle gear.
    • A is for Air.  Check the air pressure in the tires and check to the tires to make sure they are not worn out.
    • B is for Brakes.  If the bike has coaster brakes (brakes that stop the bike by peddling backward) check the brakes by placing the bike upside down and using your hand to peddle the bike forward and then spin the peddle backward to stop the wheel.  If the bike has hand brakes make sure that the levers don’t hit the handlebars when squeezed. Lift one end of the bike at a time to spin the wheel and apply the brake to see if the tire stops. Check to see that the brake pads are clean, and straight, and make contact with the tire rims properly
    • C is for Crank, Chain, and Cogs.  Check the crankarm and try to wiggle it, there should be no movement.  The crankarm is what the peddles are attached to.  The bike chain should look like metal, there should be no rust or gunk on the chain.  The chain should not sag and should drive the back wheel.  If the bike has gears check to make sure the chain easily moves from cog to cog.  All moving parts should be properly lubricated with bike chain lubrication.
  2. Confirm that you have a bike that has coaster brakes and a bike that has hand brakes.
  3. Prepare the meeting location to allow plenty of space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to see the bikes as you go over the ABC’s of bicycle gear.
  4. Set up a space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity in the Tiger Handbook, page 47.

During the meeting:

  1. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that checking your bike gear is as easy as ABC.  A is for Air.  B is for Breaks.  C is for Chains.
  2. Demonstrate the A for air in the tires.  Point out there is a number on bike tires next to the letters PSI.  The PSI tells you how much air should be in your tires.  Point out the PSI on the bike tires (note that sometimes the front tire and rear tire have different recommended PSI).  Demonstrate how to check the tire pressure using the tire pressure gauge.  Demonstrate how to use the air pump to fill a tire to the proper PSI.
  3. Demonstrate how to check brakes.  Demonstrate how to do so on a bike with coaster brakes and then one that has hand brakes.
  4. Demonstrate how to check the chains.  Demonstrate how to add bike lubrication by following the directions on the container of bike lubrication.
  5. Allow each Cub Scout and adult partner to demonstrate the ABC’s on the bike.
  6. When everyone has completed the ABC’s of bike gear gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them work on the activity on page 47 of the Tiger Handbook to properly label the parts of a bike.
The ABC’s Of My Bike
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Using their own bike or one borrowed, Cub Scout and adult partners learn the ABC’s of bike gear.

  • Each Cub Scout will need their Tiger Handbook
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • Each Cub Scout and adult partner brings their own bike
  • For those who don’t have their own bike coordinate bikes to borrow
  • Bicycle air pump
  • Tire pressure gauges, 1 for every 2 Cub Scouts
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • Philips head screwdriver
  • Variety of Allen wrenches
  • Bike chain lubrication

Before the meeting: 

  1. Become familiar with the ABC’s of bicycle gear. 
    • A is for Air.  Check the air pressure in the tires and check to the tires to make sure they are not worn out. 
    • B is for Brakes.  If the bike has coaster brakes (brakes that stop the bike by peddling backward) check the brakes by placing the bike upside down and using your hand to peddle the bike forward and then spin the peddle backward to stop the wheel.  If the bike has hand brakes make sure that the levers don’t hit the handlebars when squeezed. Lift one end of the bike at a time to spin the wheel and apply the brake to see if the tire stops. Check to see that the brake pads are clean, and straight, and make contact with the tire rims properly 
    • C is for Crank, Chain, and Cogs.  Check the crankarm and try to wiggle it, there should be no movement.  The crankarm is what the peddles are attached to.  The bike chain should look like metal, there should be no rust or gunk on the chain.  The chain should not sag and should drive the back wheel.  If the bike has gears check to make sure the chain easily moves from cog to cog.  All moving parts should be properly lubricated with bike chain lubrication.  
  2. Confirm that each Cub Scout and adult partner has a bike that they can bring to the meeting. 
  3. Prepare meeting location to allow plenty of space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on their bikes. 
  4. If the meeting location is different than your normal den meeting, time, date, or location inform Cub Scouts, adult partners, parents, and legal guardians of the changes.  
  5. The day before the meeting remind everyone in the den of the date, time, location, and to bring their bikes. 
  6. Prepare a space where Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity sheet in the Tiger Handbook, page 47. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners pair up with their bikes next to each other.  Have adult partners help their Cub Scouts as they learn about the ABC’s of bike gear.  
  2. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that checking your bike gear is as easy as ABC.  A is for Air.  B is for Breaks.  C is for Chains.   
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners check the air in their tires.  Point out that everyone’s tires have a number on it next to the letters PSI.  The PSI tells you how much air should be in your tires.  Have Cub Scouts and adult partners look for the PSI on their bike tires (note that sometimes the front tire and rear tire have different recommended PSI).  Hand out the tire pressure gauges to the adult partners and have them help their Cub Scout check the tire pressure of their bikes.  If needed have them use the air pump to fill their tires to the proper PSI. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners check their brakes.  If there are handbrakes that need adjusting have adult partners, make necessary adjustments.  
  5. Have Cub Scout and adult partners check their chains.  Have adult partner help Cub Scouts add bike chain lubrication if needed. 
  6. When everyone has completed the ABC’s of bike gear gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them work on the activity on page 47 of the Tiger Handbook to properly label the parts of a bike.
With your den or Tiger adult partner, learn about the safety gear you should use while riding a bicycle.
Ask The Pro
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time5

A guest speaker who is an expert in cycling demonstrates the ABC’s of bike safety gear.

  • Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners who have bike helmets to bring them to the meeting

When securing a guest speaker consider asking them to also cover requirements 1, 3, and 4.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a guest speaker who is an expert in cycling.  A local bike shop employee or owner or a cycling club.  Ask if they would be willing to come to your den meeting and talk with the Cub Scouts and adult partners about bike safety gear.
  2. Check to make sure they are familiar with how to properly fit a helmet for Cub Scout age youth in your den.
  3. The day before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners that if they have a bike helmet to bring it to the meeting.

During the meeting:

  1. Introduce the guest speaker and have them review bike safety gear including the proper fitting of a helmet, kneepads and elbow pads for youth, reflectors on a bike, and proper clothing typically light colored and/or reflective.
  2. For those who have bike helmets have them check their helmet for proper fitting.
Check My Bike Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts check their own safety gear.

  • Each Cub Scout and adult partner brings their own bike helmet and any other safety bike gear
  • For those who don’t have their own bike helmet coordinate bike helmets to borrow

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the proper fitting of a bike helmet from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  2. Prepare meeting location to allow plenty of space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to try on their bike helmets and lay out their safety gear.
  3. If the meeting location differs from your normal den meeting, time, date, or location inform Cub Scouts, adult partners, parents, and legal guardians of the changes.
  4. The day before the meeting remind everyone in the den of the date, time, and location, and to bring their helmets and to wear what they would wear on a bike ride.
  5. If anyone is going to borrow a helmet, disinfect the helmet with an over-the-counter disinfectant spray.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and inform them that when we ride bikes wearing a helmet is one of the most important safety gear we have.  A bicycle crash can happen at any time. A properly fitted bicycle helmet reduces the risk of head injury. More children aged 5 to 14 go to hospital emergency rooms for injuries associated with bicycles than with any other sport. Many of these injuries involve the head.
  2. Just like any safety gear, in order for it to work properly you have to wear it properly.
  3. Demonstrate to know that your bike helmet is fitted properly and if it doesn’t how to adjust it.
    • Your helmet should fit snuggly. While it is sitting flat on top of your head, make sure the helmet doesn’t rock side to side. Sizing pads come with new helmets; use the pads to securely fit to your head. Mix or match the sizing pads for the greatest comfort. In your child’s helmet, remove the padding when your child’s head grows. If the helmet has a universal fit ring instead of sizing pads, adjust the ring size to fit the head.
    • The helmet should sit level on your head and low on your forehead—one or two finger-widths above your eyebrow.
    • Center the left buckle under the chin. On most helmets, the straps can be pulled from the back of the helmet to lengthen or shorten the chin straps. This task is easier if you take the helmet off to make these adjustments.
    • Adjust the slider on both straps to form a “V” shape under, and slightly in front of,  the ears.  Lock the  slider if possible.
    • Buckle your chin strap. Tighten the strap until it is snug, so that no more than one or two fingers fit under the strap.
    • Does your helmet fit right? Open your mouth wide…big yawn! The helmet should pull down on the head. If not, refer back to step 5 and tighten the chin strap. B.  Does your helmet rock back more than two fingers above the eyebrows? If so, unbuckle, shorten the front strap by moving the slider forward.  Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. C.  Does your helmet rock forward into your eyes? If so, unbuckle, tighten the back strap by moving the slider back toward the ear. Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. D.  Roll the rubber band down to the buckle. All four straps must go through the rubber band and be close to the buckle to prevent the buckle from slipping.
  4. Have each Cub Scout and adult partner try on their bike helmet and check to make sure it is fitted properly and if not, make necessary adjustments.
With your den or Tiger adult partner, learn the safety rules to follow when riding a bicycle.
Chalk It Up Bike Rodeo
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time4

Create a bike safety course using chalk patterns on the ground.

  • Each Cub Scout and adult partner brings their own bike, bike helmet, and any other safety bike gear
  • For those who don’t have their own bike or bike helmet coordinate bikes and helmets to borrow
  • Large sidewalk chalk

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a flat paved service free of obstacles that is about 94 ft. x 50 ft. (the size of a basketball court) or larger.  If using a parking lot or other location used by cars make sure to get permission to block off the area from traffic and use traffic cones to block off the area during the activity.
  2. If you have not already done so, become familiar with the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  3. A day before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the meeting date, time, and location and to bring their bikes, bike helmets, and any other safety gear, and to dress appropriately as you will be riding bikes.
  4. Draw a bike safety course using chalk and make the course large enough for adult partners to maneuver their bikes on the course.  If the paved service is black top white or yellow chalk works best if the paved service is concrete blue, purple, or red works best.  Your course should have at least one of each of the following elements:
    • Clear starting point.  At the starting point each participant does a safety check on their bike and gear.
    • An intersection where they must demonstrate the proper hand signal for turning left and right.
    • A crosswalk area where they must get off their bike and walk across.
    • A stop sign.
    • A long straight away.
    • A slalom course with three slaloms.
    • A finishing point.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and review the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  2. Introduce the bike safety course and do a walk-through of the course to demonstrate each element of the course.
  3. Have Cub Scouts prepare their bikes and put on their safety gear.
  4. Establish an order for Cub Scouts to run the safety course before having adult partners complete the course.
When To Walk And When To Ride
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Review safety rules for bike riding.

  • Cub Scouts need to bring their Tiger Handbook, page 48
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. If you have not already done so, become familiar with the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  2. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity in the Tiger Handbook on page 48.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and review the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  2. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners complete the activity in the Tiger Handbook on page 48.
With your den or Tiger adult partner, demonstrate proper hand signals.
Simon Says – Turn Left, Turn Right
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Play Simon Says using the bike hand signals for turning left and turning right.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the proper bike hand signals for left turn, right turn, and stop.
    • Left turn is indicated by sticking your left arm out straight to the left.
    • Right turn is indicated by either sticking your left arm out to the left and bending your arm upright OR by sticking your right arm out straight to the right.
    • Stopping is indicated by sticking your left arm out to the left and bending your arm down.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and demonstrate the proper hand signals for left turn, right turn, and stop.
  2. Describe how to play Simon Says.  Everyone stands up facing the leader.  The leader calls out Simon Says a direction (turn left, turn right, or stop) and the group gives the proper hand signal.  If they give the wrong signal they are out.  If the leader gives a direction without saying “Simon says” and someone gives a signal, then they are out.  The game continues until only one person is remaining.  If time permits, the winner then becomes the leader for the next round.
  3. Play Simon Says with bike hand signals.
With your Tiger adult partner or family, ride a bike or begin learning how to ride a bike.
I Want To Ride My Bicycle!
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Take a bike ride with your den.

  • Cub Scouts and adult partners bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials
  • Cub Scouts and adult partners bring their own bike, bike helmet, and other safety gear
  • For those who do not have their own bike or bike helmet arrange for bikes and helmets to be borrowed
  • Activity Consent

Check with your pack and other den leader to see if they are planning a bike ride so you can coordinate efforts.

Before the meeting:

  1. If you have not already done so, become familiar with the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  2. Identify a bike bath that is away from traffic.
  3. A week before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the meeting and that everyone will need to bring their bike, safety gear, and Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  4. A day before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the meeting and that everyone will need to bring their bike, safety gear, and Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  5. Make sure everyone completes an Activity Consent form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and review the Bicycle Safety guidelines found on the BSA Sports and Activities page.
  2. Make sure everyone to a bike safety gear check using the ABC’s and that their bike helmets are fitted properly.
  3. Explain the bike route and make sure everyone stays together.
  4. Go on your bike ride.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure:

During the Adventure:

  • Conduct an “ABC Quick Check” on the bicycles before riding.  The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center has a checklist for air, brakes, and cranks, chain, and cogs.
  • If conducting a bike ride away from your regular meeting location make sure to have everyone complete an Activity Consent form.

The use of bikes with training wheels is acceptable for working on this Adventure.

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