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Safe And Smart

Elective Adventure

Tigers will learn about fire safety and other ways to prepare and respond to emergencies.

Requirements

Memorize your address. Recite it to your Tiger adult partner or den leader.
BINGO! That Is Where I Live
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts learn their address by putting it to the tune of BINGO.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 49
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity sheet together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and share with them that when they or someone they know is in danger they are to call 911.  When they call 911 the person who answers the phone will need to know some very important information:
    • Where you are at
    • A phone number to call you back at if you get disconnected
    • The type of emergency

    If you get separated from your parents or legal guardians knowing where you live is very helpful to the police to help you get back to them.

  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to complete the information on page 49 of the Tiger handbook.
  3. Once they have completed the activity sheet have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to memorize their address by putting their address to the tune of BINGO.
    There was a Scout
    Whose name was (Name)
    And this is where he/she lived 

    Two zero nine nine two (building number)
    Two zero nine nine two
    Two zero nine nine two

    On Lexington (Street) in Los Angeles (City)

In Case Of An Emergency
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Tigers will complete an activity with their, name, address, emergency contact number, and 911 to post in their home.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 49
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity sheet together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and share with them that when they or someone they know is in danger they are to call 911.  When they call 911 the person who answers the phone will need to know some very important information:
    • Where you are at
    • A phone number to call you back at if you get disconnected
    • The type of emergency

    If you get separated from your parents or legal guardians knowing where you live is very helpful to the police to help you get back to them.

  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to complete the information on page 49 of the Tiger handbook.
  3. Once they have completed the activity sheet, adult partners work with their Cub Scout to memorize their address.
Memorize an emergency contact’s phone number. Recite it to your Tiger adult partner or den leader.
Cheerio My Number
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Using Cheerios, Cub Scouts learn their emergency contact number.

Substitute Cheerios for any other small snack item such as raisins or nuts.  Be sure and check for food allergies.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 50
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • 8.9 oz box of Cheerios

Before the meeting:

  1. Check with parents, legal guardians, and adult partners for any food allergies, make any needed adjustments.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners complete page 50 in the Tiger handbook with their adult partner writing their number first and then having the Cub Scout copy the number in the boxes below.
  2. To help memorize their number adult partners work their Cub Scout to repeat the number five times.  Then they cover the number, and the Cub Scout places the correct number of cheerios in the correct order as the phone number.  If they get it right, they get to eat the Cheerios, if not they keep trying.
Sing A Phone Song
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts learn to memorize their phone number through a song.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 50
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the tune of “Are You Sleeping?”

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners complete page 50 in the Tiger handbook with their adult partner writing their number first and then having the Cub Scout copy the number in the boxes below.
  2. To help memorize the number have adult partners put the phone number to the tune of “Are You Sleeping?”
    For Example:
    Six Nine Five
    Six Nine Five 

    Five Five Five
    Five Five Five

    Eight Nine Fo-ur Three-eee
    Eight Nine Fo-ur Three-eee

    Green Means Call
    Green Means Call

Show you can Stop, Drop and Roll.
Stop Drop And Roll Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts learn how to Stop Drop and Roll by playing a relay race.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with Stop, Drop, and Roll method of putting out a fire when something you are wearing catches on fire. Review the information found on the U.S. Fire Administration website.
  2. Identify an area of the meeting location that is flat and free of obstacles where Cub Scouts and adult partners can participate in the Stop, Drop, and Roll relay.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners.  Inform them that in the case you ever have something that you are wearing catch on fire you are to stop, drop, and roll until the fire is out.  Demonstrate stop, drop, and roll.
  2. Inform the Cub Scouts and adult partners that they will practice by playing a game.  Line Cub Scouts up in a single file line. Approximately 15 feet away from them, line up adult partners in a single file line facing the Cub Scouts.
  3. On your signal the first adult partner will stop, drop, and then roll to the Cub Scout line.  When they reach the Cub Scouts the first Cub Scout will stop, drop, and roll until they reach the adult partner line.  Continue until everyone has demonstrated stop, drop, and roll.
With your Tiger adult partner or den leader, create a fire escape plan for your home or den meeting place. Include your outside meet-up spot. Practice the escape route you would take.
Den Meeting Exit Plan
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

The den will work to develop an evacuation plan for their meeting location and identify a meet-up spot.

  • Cub Scouts will need to bring their Tiger handbook, page 51
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with where smoke detectors are located in your meeting location.
  2. Become familiar with all the exits from the building you meet in.
  3. If there are already fire exit plans in each room become familiar with them.
  4. Identify a meet-up location away from the building you meet at.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share that when there is a fire where they live, it is best to have a plan on what to do before the emergency.  Have them look at page 51 of the Tiger handbook and point out that this is an example of where someone might live.  Have everyone identify the places that you could exit the building such as doors and windows.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to go room by room and identify the closest exit from the building then draw an arrow from that room the closest exit.
  3. When everyone has completed the activity gather everyone and walk around your meeting location identifying the closest exit from the building for each room you have access to.  If there are fire exit plans in the room point them out.
  4. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners of where everyone is to meet up in case of a fire or other emergency.  Remind adult partners not to drive off upon exiting, but to meet everyone at the meet-up location so everyone can be accounted for.  If someone is missing from the meet-up location, rescue personnel may be put in harms way looking for them.
  5. Walk everyone to the meet-up location.
  6. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners back in the meeting location.  Inform the den that you will now practice the emergency exit plan and meet back up at the meet-up location. Have adult partners with their Cub Scout go into a separate room in the building and wait until they hear you shout “Test! Test! Test!”  When everyone hears “Test!” they are to exit the building using the nearest exit calmly but quickly and meet at the meet-up spot.
  7. If time permits do this one more time.
It’s Time To Get Out!
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Create an escape route.

  • Cub Scouts will need to bring their Tiger handbook, page 51
  • Graph paper, 2 sheets per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. A day prior to the meeting ask parents, legal guardians, and adult partners to become familiar with the layout of their home and where smoke detectors are located.  Let them know that the den activity will include making a map of the building the Cub Scout lives in and labeling the location of smoke detectors.
  2. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share that when there is a fire where they live, it is best to have a plan on what to do before the emergency.  Have them look at page 51 of the Tiger handbook and point out that this is an example of where someone might live.  Have everyone identify the places that you could exit the building such as doors and windows.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to go room by room and identify the closest exit from the building then draw an arrow from that room the closest exit.
  3. When everyone has completed the activity, the Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to create a map of the building they live in using the graph paper.  If they live in a building that has more than one floor discuss emergency exits such as internal and external stairs.  Families may want to consider emergency escape ladders for bedrooms that are on the second floor. Have adult partners talk with their Cub Scouts about where they are to meet in case, they have an emergency in their house like a fire.
  4. Once everyone has created their escape routes for their home, ask each Cub Scout to share with the den  where they would go when leaving a burning building.
  5. Ask everyone to practice exiting their home and meeting up at their location.
With your Tiger adult partner, find the location of the smoke detectors in your home or den meeting place. Confirm they are working properly.
Where There Is Smoke
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Locate smoke detectors in your home.

  • Cub Scouts and adult partners

Before the meeting

  1. Learn about smoke detectors from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  2. The day before the meeting ask parents, legal guardians, and adult partners to be familiar with the layout of their home and the location of smoke detectors.  Let them know that the den activity will include making a map of the building the Cub Scout lives in and smoke detectors locations.
  3. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity together.
  4. Identify the type of smoke detectors in your meeting location and how to test them.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the den the importance of smoke detectors.  Point out the smoke detectors in your meeting location and if possible, demonstrate how to test them.  Share with Cub Scouts and adult partners that they should be familiar with the type of smoke detectors they have at home and how to test them and if needed when to change the batteries.
  2. When everyone has completed the activity, the Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to create a map of the building they live in using the graph paper.  Have them make a circle where the smoke detectors in their home are located.
With your Tiger adult partner or den leader, learn why matches and lighters are only for adults.
Spread Like Wildfire
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time1

The den will learn how fast fire can spread and why starting fires can cause harm.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn about the current fire rating in your area using the National Weather Service Fire Weather map.
  2. Identify an area free of obstacles to conduct the activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share with them that fire can be very harmful and an accident with matches or a lighter can get out of control very quickly and that is why Cub Scouts should only have an adult use matches or lighters or start fires.
  2. Inform the den that to demonstrate how fast a fire can get out of control they will become a fire.
  3. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners form a circle shoulder to shoulder facing outward.
  4. Explain to them that now they are a small fire, but that fire can double in size every 30 seconds!
  5. Have everyone take one step forward while you count to 30.  Have everyone look at how big the circle has grown and that is the path the fire has taken burning everything in that path.
  6. Now have everyone take two steps forward while you count to 30.  Have everyone look at how big the circle is now after only one minute.
  7. Now have everyone take four steps forward while you count to 30.  This is how much a fire can spread in just 90 seconds!
  8. Now have everyone take eight steps forward while you count to 30.  This is how much a fire can spread in just 2 minutes.  How big is the circle?  Is it bigger than their bedroom?  Their house?  Make the connection that this is why it is important to never play with matches or lighters because in just a short amount of time a fire can grow out of control and cause a lot of harm and damage before the fire department can arrive.
  9. If time permits you may want to know what the fire response rate is for your location and have the den continue to double their steps for every 30 seconds to see how far the fire could spread before the fire department arrives.
Visit an emergency responder station or have an emergency responder visit your den.
Meet Emergency Responders
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Plan a visit to a fire station or other emergency response station.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local fire station and schedule a time when the den can come and visit.  Ask if the fire station has any fire prevention programs, they have for 1st graders and if they would be willing to share that program while you are visiting.  Make a request for Cub Scouts and adult partners to learn about the equipment that is used to fight fires and how the station is supported by the local community.
  2. A week before the meeting inform Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners about the meeting date, time, and location.
  3. At a meeting before the visit have a thank you card for the fire fighters and have members of the den sign it and bring it with you to the visit.
  4. A day prior to the meeting confirm with the contact at the fire station of your visit and remind Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners about the meeting date, time, and location. Ask them to bring their Activity Consent forms.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners meet in a designated spot such as the front entrance to the station.
  2. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and remind Cub Scouts to follow the Scout Oath and Law during the visit.
  3. Have the contact at the fire station share with the Cub Scouts what they do as fire fighters, the equipment they use, and how to be careful with fire.  Allow time for questions and answers.
  4. When done give the contact the thank you card from the den.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

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