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Standing Tall

Required Adventure

In this Adventure, the Protect Yourself Rules will give you guidance on keeping yourself safe. You will also identify ways to use electronics responsibly and ways to protect your body when you’re playing or working. When bears feel they are in danger, they may stand on their back legs, standing tall, to let the danger know that they are brave and know how to keep themselves safe.

Requirements

With permission from your parent or legal guardian, watch the Protect Yourself Rules video for the Bear rank.
Protect Yourself Rules Video Bear
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Watch the Protect Yourself Rules video with your parent or legal guardian.

  • Standing Tall 1 Parent Notification found in Additional Resources
  • Computer or smart device
  • Internet connection to view the “Protect Yourself Rules Bear” video (duration 13 minutes)
  • Or download video onto device if internet is not available where you will be watching.

Before the meeting:

  1. Inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Standing Tall 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1.

During the meeting or at home:

  1. Parent or legal guardian watch the ”Protect Yourself Rules” video with their Cub Scout

Standing Tall 1 Parent Notification

Complete the Personal Space Bubble worksheet that is part of the Protect Yourself Rules resources.
Personal Bubble
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Identify people that fall within Intimate, Personal, Social, and Public bubbles.

  • Personal Bubble worksheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencils one for each Cub Scout
  • Colored pencils or crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Personal Bubble worksheet, one for each Cub Scout.
  2. Set up meeting space with a place for Cub Scouts to work on their Personal Bubble worksheet.

During the meeting:

  1. Provide a pencil and worksheet to each Cub Scout.
  2. Discuss our personal space bubbles and who we are most comfortable being close to.
    • Explain that we feel more comfortable being close to people we know well and prefer to keep some space between us and strangers.
    • The space directly around us is our intimate space. This space is just for us, although we may also allow family in this space.
    • Next is our personal space, which goes all around us as far as the ends of our outstretched fingertips. We are usually comfortable with friends and family in this space.
    • After that is social space. We’re most comfortable hanging out with friends or talking in groups in this space.
    • Last is public space, which is where we’re most comfortable with strangers or people out in public.
  3. Have Cub Scouts write the names of people who they would feel comfortable having in each space circle.
    Personal space would have the names of friends or family members. Public space can describe a stranger, like a mailman or a neighbor.
  4. Share with the Cub Scouts, Why do we feel more comfortable with certain people in certain spaces around us? All Cub Scouts to respond.  Share with the Cub Scouts that it is important for us to be aware of these spaces in order to be able to tell others when they are too close to us. If someone comes into our personal space and we don’t want them to, we can tell them politely to move away. We can also be forceful if they don’t listen. It is important for us to feel safe and comfortable, and we all have to respect each other’s personal space bubbles.

Personal Bubble worksheet

With your parent or legal guardian, set up a family policy for digital devices.
Family Digital Device Policy
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

With parents and legal guardians, set up a family digital device policy.

  • Digital Safety Pledge found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencil or pen for each Cub Scout family

If this is done at a den meeting notify parents and legal guardians that they must attend this meeting so this requirement can be completed.  This requirement can be completed at home.

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts and parent or legal guardian to have an area to write.
  2. Print a copy of the Digital Safety Pledge for each Cub Scout family.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask parents or legal guardians to sit next to their Cub Scout and hand a worksheet to each family.
  2. Have Cub Scouts take turns reading off each item and ask the following questions when finished:
    • Why do you think it is important to have rules about this?
    • Do you have digital policy rules already?
    • What should we do if someone tries to ask for personal information?
  3. Have Cub Scouts and parents and legal guardians fill out the form and sign.

After the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts hang the contract on their refrigerator when they get home.

Digital Safety Pledge

Identify common personal safety gear for your head, eyes, mouth, hands, and feet. List how each of these items protect you. Demonstrate the proper use of personal safety gear for an activity.
Kitchen Safety Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn about personal safety in the kitchen.

  • Kitchen Safety worksheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencil, one per Cub Scout
  • Bowl
  • Spoon
  • Piece of produce
  • Milk jug, empty
  • Meat thermometer
  • Oven mitts
  • Potholders
  • Refrigerated cookie dough, enough for each Cub Scout to have two cookies
  • Cookie sheet
  • Parchment paper
  • Spatula
  • Knife and cutting board, if cookie dough is shaped like a log
  • Cooling rack
  • First Aid Kit

Before the meeting:

  1. Print a copy of the Kitchen Safety worksheet for each Cub Scout.
  2. Have access to Kitchen Safety Answers worksheet by either printing or using a smart device.

During the meeting:

  1. Hand out a worksheet and pencil to each Cub Scout.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to complete the Kitchen Safety worksheet. When Cub Scouts are finished, go over the answers.
  3. Once the worksheet is completed, explain to Cub Scout you will hold up or show an item, and they will have to decide which rule it represents.
    • Set bowl on table edge: Keep items away from the edge of the counter
    • Hold up your hands: Wash hands often
    • Lick and hold up the spoon: Wash utensils if they touch your mouth
    • Hold up the milk jug: Perishable item 2-hour time limit
    • Hold up the produce: Wash produce before using it
    • Hold up meat thermometer: Cook meats fully before eating
    • Hold up oven mitt: Use an oven mitt when touching a hot pan or pot
  4. Tell Cub Scouts that they are going to bake cookies. Ask one Cub Scout to read the directions on the package aloud.
  5. Have a Cub Scout turn on the oven to preheat it.
  6. Ask Cub Scouts to wash their hands.
  7. If you’re using it, put a piece of parchment paper on the cookie sheet.
  8. If you’re using the log-shaped cookie dough, have Cub Scouts take turns slicing the dough using the knife and cutting board. If you’re using the break apart dough, have Cub Scouts take turns breaking it apart. Ask them to put their cookie dough on the cookie sheet.
  9. Have a Cub Scout carefully put the cookie sheet in the oven.
  10. After the time indicated on the package, ask a Cub Scout to remove the pan from the oven using the oven mitt. Then have them put it on the potholders.
  11. Instruct Cub Scouts to take turns using the spatula to remove the cookies from the cookie sheet and put them on the cooling rack.  Remind Cub Scouts that the cookie sheet is hot and to avoid touching it.
  12. When the cookies are cool, allow Cub Scouts to enjoy them!
Science Safety Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Learn about personal safety gear needed for conducting a science experiment.

  • Safety goggles for each Cub Scout
  • Latex gloves
  • Apron or lab coat
  • Closed toe shoes
  • Flip flops
  • Sunglasses
  • 20 oz. bottles of diet soda, one for each Cub Scout
  • Package of Mentos, one for each Cub Scout
  • Index card, one for each Cub Scout
  • Strip of paper as wide as the roll of Mentos for each Cub Scout
  • Two pieces of tape for each Cub Scout
  • Small piece of plywood, approx. 2’ x 2’, if there is no flat surface available

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to have room to conduct the experiment. Cover table tops and floor.
  2. Review the during the meeting instructions and complete the experiment yourself wearing safety goggles. Identify areas that may be difficult for Cub Scouts or that may require additional instructions.
  3. Cut the strips of paper so that they can be wrapped around the Mentos. Make the strip a little longer than the roll.
  4. Find a flat surface outside of your meeting location for the Mentos and Diet Coke experiment. This will need to be an area that is ok to get wet with Diet Coke. You may need to bring a small piece of plywood, if there isn’t a flat area.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain that when conducting science experiments, a scientist must have the following gear to stay safe. Ask Cub Scouts why they think each item is necessary.
    • Safety goggles
    • Gloves
    • Apron or lab coat
    • Closed toe shoes
  2. As each safety item is identified demonstrate how to properly wear the item and keep it on as you prepare for the experiment.
  3. Explain to Cub Scouts that they will be conducting a fun science experiment. They will be preparing for the experiment inside, but they’ll need to do it outside.
  4. Hand out a pack of Mentos, a strip of paper, and two pieces of tape to each Cub Scout.
  5. Instruct them to wrap the paper around the Mentos, and tape it. Tell them to fold one end of the paper over one end of the Mentos and tape it. The other end will remain open.
  6. Have Cub Scouts open the pack of Mentos and place all of them in the tube.
  7. Tell Cub Scouts to bring their Mentos tube and go outside.
  8. Ask Cub Scouts to put on their goggles and apron and gather at least 3 feet away from the flat surface.
  9. One at a time, have each Cub Scout take their bottle of Diet Coke to the flat surface. Have them open the bottle. Ask Cub Scouts to put the open end of their tube of Mentos on the card and place it directly over the opening of the soda bottle.
  10. When Cub Scouts are ready, ask them to remove the card and let all the Mentos drop into the soda at once and quickly move out of the way.
  11. Give each Cub Scout a turn.
Sport Safety Gear
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Learn about personal safety gear needed for skating / rollerblading. 

  • ​​​Sport Safety Gear worksheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencils
  • Helmet for each Cub Scout
  • Wrist guards for each Cub Scout
  • Knee pads for each Cub Scout
  • Elbow pads for each Cub Scout
  • Cub Scouts will need to bring their own roller blades, roller skates or a skateboard
  • If a Cub Scout does not have roller blades, roller skates, skateboard, or safety gear then arrange for them to borrow from another family.
  • First Aid Kit to include band-aids, first aid cream, and an ace bandage
  • Activity Consent form

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scouting Skating regulations.
  2. Locate a flat space, free of obstacles, where the Cub Scouts can safely skate or rollerblade.
  3. Secure additional adult supervision from parents or legal guardians so there is at least one adult for every five youth.
  4. Two days before the meeting remind Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians that the Cub Scouts will be going skating/rollerblading at the meeting and that they should bring their safety gear: helmet, wrist guards, kneepads, and elbow pads along with their skates or rollerblades.
  5. Remind Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians of the date, time, and location of the meeting, especially if the location is different from your regular meeting location.
  6. If meeting at a different location than your regular meeting location have parents complete an Activity Consent form.
  7. Print one copy of the Sport Safety Gear worksheet for each Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Hand out a worksheet and pencil to each Cub Scout. Have them complete the worksheet.
  2. When Cub Scouts are finished, go over the worksheet to see if everyone got the correct answers.
  3. Ask the following questions:
    • Why is it important to wear a helmet?
    • Why is it important to wear wrist guards?
    • Why is it important to wear knee and elbow pads?
  4. Demonstrate to know that your bike helmet is fitted properly and if it doesn’t how to adjust it.
    • Your helmet should fit snuggly. While it is sitting flat on top of your head, make sure the helmet doesn’t rock side to side. Sizing pads come with new helmets; use the pads to securely fit to your head. Mix or match the sizing pads for the greatest comfort. In your child’s helmet, remove the padding when your child’s head grows. If the helmet has a universal fit ring instead of sizing pads, adjust the ring size to fit the head.
    • The helmet should sit level on your head and low on your forehead—one or two finger-widths above your eyebrow.
    • Center the left buckle under the chin. On most helmets, the straps can be pulled from the back of the helmet to lengthen or shorten the chin straps. This task is easier if you take the helmet off to make these adjustments.
    • Adjust the slider on both straps to form a “V” shape under, and slightly in front of,  the ears.  Lock the  slider if possible.
    • Buckle your chin strap. Tighten the strap until it is snug, so that no more than one or two fingers fit under the strap.
    • A. Does your helmet fit right? Open your mouth wide…big yawn! The helmet should pull down on the head. If not, refer back to step 5 and tighten the chin strap. B.  Does your helmet rock back more than two fingers above the eyebrows? If so, unbuckle, shorten the front strap by moving the slider forward.  Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. C.  Does your helmet rock forward into your eyes? If so, unbuckle, tighten the back strap by moving the slider back toward the ear. Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again. D.  Roll the rubber band down to the buckle. All four straps must go through the rubber band and be close to the buckle to prevent the buckle from slipping.
  5. After the questions have been answered, ask  Cub Scouts to put on their safety gear. Ask parent or legal guardian to check that the gear is being correctly worn.
  6. Have Cub Scouts go skating or rollerblading.

Sport Safety Gear worksheet

Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure:

  • Review the  BSA Youth Protection content.
  • Review the Protect Yourself Rules-Bear video.
  • This Adventure may be completed at home or as a den.  Prior to the meeting inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Bear Standing Tall​​ 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1.

During the Adventure:

  • There is a chance that a child may disclose a situation that causes suspicion of abuse.  If you suspect a child is being abused follow the reporting guidelines found on the BSA Youth Protection site.

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