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Stories In Shapes

Elective Adventure

Tigers will explore math through the discovery of art and how shapes and symbols can tell a story.

Requirements

Explore art in your community.
Art On Display
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Visit an art museum.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local art museum to schedule a visit.  Ask if there are tours available and inform the museum that the tour would be appropriate for first graders.  Share all the requirements for this Adventure with the museum so they can incorporate as many requirements into the tour as possible.  Confirm the visit with the museum and get a contact name for the museum.
  2. A week prior to the meeting inform Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the visit to the museum.  Confirm the gathering location.
  3. Have parents or legal guardians complete Activity Consent forms.
  4. A day prior to the meeting send another reminder to the den of the date, time, and location of the visit to the museum and any other details they may need.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners at the designated gathering location at the museum.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners form buddy groups of at least two Cub Scouts and two adult partners.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts of the Scout Law and to stay with their buddy groups.
  4. Check in with the contact at the museum.
  5. Enjoy the visit.
Art Trail
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Take a walk in a neighborhood with public art such as outdoor murals, statues, and sculptures.

  • Activity Consent form for each Cub Scout
  • Everyone should bring the Cub Scout Six Essentials with them on the walk
    • Water bottle with water
    • First Aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun protection
    • Trail food

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify an area in your community that has public displays of art outside such as murals, statues, and sculptures.  This may also be a local art show. Identify a walking path for the den to take to see the different displays of art.
  2. Research the different items that you will see on your walk and become familiar with who the artist is/was, any meaning or symbolism behind the art, who commissioned the work, and the medium in which it was created.
  3. Create a map for your walk that includes the route and the location of the art you will see.
  4. A week prior to the meeting inform Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the art walk.  Confirm the gathering location.
  5. Have parents or legal guardians complete activity consent forms.
  6. A day prior to the meeting send another reminder to the den of the date, time, and location of the visit to the museum and any other details they may need.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners at the designated gathering location at the museum.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners form buddy groups of at least two Cub Scouts and two adult partners.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts of the Scout Law and to stay with their buddy groups.
  4. Walk your route and plan to stop at each work of art and allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to discuss and share what they like about it.   Share with them what you learned about the art.
  5. After the walk ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what they liked best and why.
Virtual Tour Of Art
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Coordinate a virtual tour of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Laptop with internet connection and projector and screen OR a large smart TV with internet connection

You can substitute Van Gogh Museum with a different art museum that has online tours or virtual tours. 

Before the meeting:

  1. Explore the virtual tours available at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam.
  2. Identify the tours that you want to explore with the den.
  3. Set up the meeting space to allow people to view the screen.
  4. Connect your device(s) to the internet and have a picture of Van Gogh “Starry Night” on the screen.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that in this activity you are going to take a virtual trip to another country to explore one of the most famous artists in modern history, Vincent Van Gogh.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners if the image on the screen looks familiar.  See if anyone can name the painting “Starry Night”.
  3. Vincent Van Gogh lived from 1853 to 1890, he died young at 37 years old.  In a very short time, he created over 2100 different works of art of that 860 were oil paintings.  The style of painting he is known for is called Post-Impressionist.  You will notice that his paintings don’t look like photos with clean and sharp lines.  You can also see that he uses brush strokes and marks to help define what he is painting.
  4. Go through the online exhibit “A brother like no other” on the site.
  5. Afterward ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what they like the best.
Look closely at art or a picture of art with your den or Tiger adult partner. Decide what you like about the art, and share your ideas with your den, family or Tiger adult partner.
Art On Display Part 2
LocationTravel
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

This activity is designed to be done in combination with requirement 1 and the Art on Display activity at an art museum.

  • No additional supplies

This activity is designed to be done while visiting an art museum.

Before the meeting:

  1. Complete the “Before the Meeting” items in the Art On Display activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share the following about looking at art:
    • As you look at a piece of artwork more closely, what stories do you imagine?
    • What mood or feelings does it create?
    • What shapes can you identify?
    • Is there a color that is used more often than others?
    • Does it look like real life?
    • If not, is it abstract? One type of art, called abstract art, does not. Abstract artists hope their work will give you a certain feeling. Some abstract artists draw their designs out first in detail. Others just start painting and hope their feelings and thoughts are seen in their art.
    • Different people will see different meanings in art.
  2. After visiting the museum share what your favorite art was and why.
Art Trail Part 2
LocationTravel
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

This activity is designed to be done in combination with requirement 1 and the Art Trail activity.

  • No additional supplies needed

This activity is designed to be done while conducting an art trial walk.

Before the meeting:

  1. Complete the “Before the Meeting” items in the Art Trail activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share the following about looking at art:
    • As you look at a piece of artwork more closely, what stories do you imagine?
    • What mood or feelings does it create?
    • What shapes can you identify?
    • Is there a color that is used more often than others?
    • Does it look like real life?
    • If not, is it abstract? One type of art, called abstract art, does not. Abstract artists hope their work will give you a certain feeling. Some abstract artists draw their designs out first in detail. Others just start painting and hope their feelings and thoughts are seen in their art.
    • Different people will see different meanings in art.
  2. After the art trail share what your favorite art was and why.
Virtual Tour Of Art 2
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

This activity is designed to be done in combination with requirement 1 and the Virtual Tour of Art activity.

  • No additional supplies needed

This activity is designed to be done while conducting a virtual art museum tour.

Before the meeting:

  1. Complete the “Before the Meeting” items in the Virtual Tour of Art activity.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share the following about looking at art:
    • As you look at a piece of artwork more closely, what stories do you imagine?
    • What mood or feelings does it create?
    • What shapes can you identify?
    • Is there a color that is used more often than others?
    • Does it look like real life?
    • If not, is it abstract? One type of art, called abstract art, does not. Abstract artists hope their work will give you a certain feeling. Some abstract artists draw their designs out first in detail. Others just start painting and hope their feelings and thoughts are seen in their art.
    • Different people will see different meanings in art.
  2. After the virtual tour share what your favorite art was and why.
Create a piece of art using shapes.
Folding Art
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Make an origami cat.

  • 8 ½” x 8 ½” pieces of paper, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Origami Cat instructions found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Origami Cat instructions for each Cub Scout.
  2. Practice making the cat yourself.
  3. Set up the meeting location with space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts and adult partners that for this acidity you will make a cat by folding paper.  The art of folding paper is called origami and comes from Japan.  When you fold paper, you will make squares and triangles and these shapes can be used to make art.
  2. Show the den your origami cat.  Have the Cub Scout work with their adult partners to make their own origami cat.
My Art From Shapes
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Tiger Stories in Shapes 3 Origami Cat

  • Each Cub Scout will need their Tiger handbook, page 55
  • Scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • 8 ½” x 11” various colors of construction paper

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location with space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts and adult partners that for this acidity you will make art from shapes.  Inform the Cub Scouts that shapes are all around us and if we look, we can see circles, squares, triangles, and other shapes in everyday objects like a car, a house, or even a tree.
  2. Have Cub Scouts with help from their adult partners cut out the shapes from page 55 of their Tiger handbook.
  3. They can use the shapes to then cut out shapes from the different colored construction paper to make a work of art.
  4. Share with the Cub Scouts that their art can be abstract if they want to.  Abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent anything in real life but uses shapes, forms, colors, and textures to make art.
  5. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners make their art from the shapes and then share it with the den when they are done.
Spiral Art
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Make a drawing using a spiral stencil set.

  • Spiral stencil set such as Spirograph™, enough sets to share
  • Colored ink pens, enough to share
  • 8 ½” x 11” blank sheets of copy paper

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the stencil set by creating your own drawings.
  2. Set up the meeting space to give room for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with Cub Scouts and adult partners that for this activity they will create artwork that makes use of circles and ovals.
  2. Demonstrate how to use the stencil set.  Allow Cub Scouts to make their own drawings using the set.  As they do ask them what they have noticed about the different sized circles and what type of patterns they make.  (Larger circles make small patterns and the smaller circles make larger patterns).
Tangram Animals
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Using tangrams make animal shapes.

  • Copies of cut-out tangram and animal shapes found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Scissors, a pair for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Tangram Cut Out for each Cub Scout.
  2. Print Tangram Animal Designs for each Cub Scout.
  3. Set up meeting space to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Inform the Cub Scouts that shapes are all around us and if we look, we can see circles, squares, triangles, and other shapes in everyday objects like a car, a house, or even a tree.  For this activity Cub Scouts will use a special group of shapes called tangrams.  A tangram is a puzzle invented in China that is made by cutting a square of paper into seven pieces. These pieces can be used to make many different figures and shapes.
  2. Have Cub Scouts with the help of their adult partner cut out the tangrams and then have them arrange the tangrams into the different animal shapes.
  3. If time allows encourage Cub Scouts to create something of their own design using all seven pieces of the tangram.

Tangram Animal Designs

Tangram Cut Out

Learn how to spell your name in Braille and sign language.
Get To Know Me And Sign Language
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Invite someone who is deaf or an interpreter for the deaf to visit the den.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 57

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify someone who is hearing impaired, or an interpreter, who is fluent in American Sign Language.
  2. Ask if they will visit the den and share with the den some basic words and phrases in American Sign Language such as how to introduce yourself, how to say thank you and you are welcome, and any other common phrases.
  3. Ask if they would also share any technology or items, they use to help them communicate, such as how they use a phone.
  4. Confirm the date, time, and location of the den meeting with the guest.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with the Cub Scouts that sign language is a form of communication for those who are hearing impaired.  Unlike written words where we use letters to spell words, American Sign Language uses hand motions.  It’s like a very useful form of art as you paint words using your hands.
  2. Introduce the guest speaker.
  3. Have the guest speaker share their story and help teach the Cub Scouts and adult partners some basic phrases.
  4. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners use the Tiger handbook, page 57, to learn how to sign their name.
  5. Thank the guest speaker.

After the meeting:

  1. Send a thank you note to the guest speaker.
Reading With Your Hands
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Using puffy round stickers spell your name in braille.

  • Braille Alphabet found in Additional Resources
  • Write Your Name in Braille found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Print copies of the Braille Alphabet and Write Your Name in Braille worksheets, enough for one for each Cub Scouts.
  2. Become familiar with the braille alphabet.  Write your name in braille to use as an example.
  3. Set up the meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that art can speak to us in many ways but for those who are blind, they must rely on other senses such as touch.  Some art is designed to be touched.  Today we will explore a written language that was designed to be touched, not seen.  Braille is a type of writing that is created by making bumps or holes in paper to represent the alphabet.  Each letter in braille has two columns of three spots.  A letter in the alphabet is represented by which spots have a bump.  To read braille you take your finger to feel the bumps to identify each letter.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners work together to spell their name in braille by coloring in the dots on the activity sheet.
  3. When finished, have each Cub Scout and adult partner share their name in braille.
The Art Of Sign Language
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts will learn about American Sign Language and how to sign their name.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 57

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with American Sign Language. This video introduces 25 signs in American Sign Language and basic sentences and may provide some help.
  2. Learn how to sign your name in American Sign Language.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and introduce yourself using American Sign Language (ASL.)
  2. Share with the Cub Scouts that sign language is a form of communication for those who are hard of hearing or deaf.  Unlike written words where we use letters to spell words, American Sign Language uses hand motions.  It’s like a very useful form of art as you paint words using your hands.
  3. Share with Cub Scouts that when introducing ourselves to one another, we will say our name. For the hearing impaired, names are typically spelled when first meeting someone. Demonstrate how to sign your name.
  4. Next, demonstrate how to say “Hi, I am (Name)”, “Thank you”, and “See you later”.
  5. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners practice signing their name and then move on to other phrases.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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