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Team Tiger

Required Adventure

Citizenship is one of the four aims of the BSA program.  For Tigers citizenship begins at home and their den.  They will explore how they can contribute to their home and community.

Requirements

Play a game with your den, or family members, that has a set of rules. Discuss why rules are important to the game you are playing.
Card Game – Go Fish
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play a game of Go Fish!

  • A standard deck of playing cards – one deck for every four members of the den, including adult partners. 
  • Tables 
  • Chairs 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Become familiar with the rules and how to play “Go FIsh.”  Learn to play by visiting the Bicycle Cards website Go Fish! 
  2. Set up the meeting room to allow space for groups of four to play Go Fish!  Place a deck of cards at each station. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and divide them into groups of four, keeping adult partners together with their Cub Scouts.  You can have a group of 2 or 3. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Review the rules to playing Go Fish! 
  4. Have the groups play at least one round of Go Fish! 
Tigers Play Cornhole
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Play a game of cornhole.

Check with adult partners in the den to see if someone already owns cornhole boards that can be used by the den.  This activity includes instructions on how to make a set of cornhole boards.  Once built, the cornhole boards can be used for years to come by other dens and the pack.  It’s a great game to have available at pack meetings or campouts. 

  • Cornhole boards – one set for every four members of the den, including adult partners 
  • If building cornhole boards: 
    • 4 48-inch 2x4s 
    • 4 21-inch 2x4s 
    • 2 24×48-inch sheets of ½-inch plywood 
    • 4 11 ½-inch 2x4s 
    • Deck screws 
    • Carriage bolts, washers, and wing nuts 
    • 120-grit sandpaper 
    • Water-based polyurethane 
    • Tape Measure 
    • Table saw 
    • Scribe tool 
    • Power drill 
    • 6-inch hole saw (bit) 
    • Jigsaw 
    • Clamps 
    • Paintbrush 
    • Paint roller 
    • Foam brushes 
  • Cornhole beanbags – a set of four (different colors) for every four members of the den, including adult partners 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the American Cornhole Association website and become familiar with the rules of cornhole.  
  2. Keep the rules simple and adjust the distance of the cornhole boards to bring them closer so Cub Scouts can compete. 
  3. Contact the families in the den to identify a parent or adult partner that has cornhole boards that can be used for the meeting or someone who is willing to build cornhole boards. 
  4. Gather cornhole boards or build them, see additional resources for instructions on how to build cornhole boards. 
  5. Set up a cornhole course for every four people in the den, including adult partners in an area that is free of hazards. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and divide them into groups of four, keeping adult partners together with their Cub Scouts.  If necessary, you can have a group of two to create even teams.  Cornhole is played with either two players or teams of two vs. another team of two. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Review the rules to cornhole and how to score. 
  4. Cornhole is played with two teams, each consisting of one player (singles) or two players (doubles). 
  5. Players throw their bags, in an underhand motion from next to each side of the board. 
  6. Players alternate turns to throw their cornhole bags toward the opposite board. 
  7. After each team has thrown four bags, players take the score and resume throwing to the opposite board. 
  8. The team who scored points in the previous round goes first in the next round. If it was tied, the team who went first in the last round gets to go first again. 
  9. The objective is to be the first team to score 21 points. 
  10. A cornhole bag that goes through the hole is worth 3 points. 
  11. A cornhole bag that lands on the board and stays there is worth 1 point. 
  12. A cornhole bag that lands on the ground or bounces onto the board is worth 0 points. 
  13. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners play at least one round of cornhole together. 
Tigers Play Kickball
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play a game of kickball.

  • 10-inch rubber kickball  
  • 4 baseball bases 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the World Kickball Association website and become familiar with the rules of kickball.  
  2. Keep the rules simple and adjust the distance of the kickball field so Cub Scouts can compete. 
  3. Identify a space clear of obstacles and hazards to lay out the kickball field. 
  4. Layout the kickball field using baseball bases. 
  5. If the kickball field you are using is not at your regular meeting location, send a reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den about the date, time, and location of the den meeting. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and divide them into two teams, keeping adult partners together with their Cub Scouts.   
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Review the rules to kickball and how to score, rules are like baseball. 
  4. To begin, one team will be in the outfield and the other will be the kicking team. 
  5. A member of the outfield team is the pitcher and begins the game by rolling the ball to the first kicker on the kicking team. 
  6. Once the kicker kicks the ball, they run around the bases in order. 
  7. If the ball lands in the foul zone, the kicker must try again, and the foul will count as a strike. 
  8. If the ball is caught without touching the ground the kicker is out. 
  9. When running bases, a kicker can be out if they are touched with the ball while it is in the hands of an opposing team member when they are off the base. 
  10. You may not throw the kickball at someone to get them out.  
  11. A team gets three outs before the team switches to the outfield. 
  12. The team with the most points  
With your Tiger Adult Partner, choose a job that will help your team. Follow through by doing that job at least once.
Tiger Flag Ceremony
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Participate in a flag-raising ceremony for your school.

  • Flagpole 
  • United States flag 
  • Cub Scouts will need to be in their full uniform 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Become familiar with United States flag etiquette 
  2. Contact a local school to identify an opportunity for the den to conduct a flag-raising ceremony.  
  3. Ask that after the ceremony that the principal meet with the Cub Scouts to thank them. 
  4. Become familiar with how to raise the United States flag. There are several variations to conducting a flag ceremony.  Keep the ceremony simple and give plenty of time for Cub Scouts to practice raising the flag before doing so in front of an audience.  
    • The United States flag is to be flown in a position of honor.  If flown with other flags on the same pole, the United States flag is displayed on top.  If it is flown with other flags that are on separate poles near the United States flag flies on the tallest pole.  
    • It takes at least three people to raise the United States flag to form the color guard.  Two unfold the flag and hold it while the third person attaches the flag and raises the flag.  As the flag is being raised the two holding the flag ensure that the flag does not touch the ground and that the lines the flag is attached to remain untangled.   
    • If you have more Cub Scouts participating, they may join the color guard and simply walk with them to and from the flagpole, this counts as meeting the requirement.  
    • When the United States flag is being raised it is to be done quickly.  When it is coming down it is to be done slowly. 
    • Those who are near the flagpole are asked to stop and stand. 
    • The adult leader calls out “Attention!” 
    • Then they call out “Color guard advance.” The Cub Scouts who are raising the flag move to the flagpole with any other Cub Scouts following. 
    • The adult leader calls out “Color guard, raise the colors.”  The Cub Scouts then attach the United States flag and wait. 
    • Once the flag is attached the adult leader calls out “Scouts salute.”  All Cub Scouts, except the three who are raising the flag, give the Cub Scout salute.  The three Cub Scouts raise the flag.  Once the flag reaches the top, the Cub Scouts tie off the line, and then salute the flag. 
    • Once everyone is saluting the leader then calls out “Two.” All Cub Scouts then stop giving the salute. 
    • The adult leader calls out “Color guard, dismissed.”  All Cub Scouts then return to where they started. 
  5. At prior den meetings give time for Cub Scouts to practice raising the flag. 
  6. Send a meeting reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners to remind them of the date, time, and location of the flag ceremony.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners at least 30 minutes prior to the ceremony. 
  2. Conduct a walk-through of the ceremony. 
  3. Conduct the flag ceremony. 
  4. Have the principal thank the Cub Scouts. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Send a thank you note to the school principal. 
Tiger Greeter
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time4

Tiger den serve as greeters for the pack meeting.

  • At least one Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting: 

  1. Contact the Cubmaster and identify a pack meeting where the den can come early to greet everyone. 
  2. Send a reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den the date, time, and location of the pack meeting that the den will greet people when they arrive. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners 30 minutes before the pack meeting. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners practice different ways to welcome people as they arrive. 
  3. Assign locations for Cub Scouts and adult partners at entrances to greet people. 
  4. Have everyone in place and ready 10 minutes before the pack meeting. 
  5. When people arrive greet them and welcome them. 
Tigers Help Clean Up
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Help set up and clean up for a pack meeting.

  • 2 pieces of paper 
  • Magic marker 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Contact the Cubmaster and identify a pack meeting where the den can come early to set up the meeting space and stay after the meeting to clean up. 
  2. Send a reminder to all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den the date, time, and location of the pack meeting that the den will help set up and clean up. 
  3. Discuss with the Cubmaster or other adult leaders in the pack on how to get access to the meeting location early. 
  4. Discuss with the Cubmaster or other adult leaders in the pack on what needs to be done to set up for the meeting and what needs to be done to clean up after the meeting.   
  5. Write a list of things that need to be done to set up the room on one sheet of paper. For example: 
    • Set up tables and chairs 
    • Place the United States flag and pack flag on the stage 
    • Set up a table for advancements 
    • Unlock bathrooms 
  6. Write a list of things that need to be done to clean up the room on one sheet of paper. For example: 
    • Fold tables and chairs and put them away 
    • Place the United States flag and pack the flag in the closet 
    • Lock bathrooms 
    • Sweep the floor 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners at least 30 minutes prior to the pack meeting. 
  2. Review the list of things that need to be done to set up and what to do to clean up. 
  3. Make assignments of Cub Scouts and adult partners on what they will do. 
  4. Set up the room for the pack meeting. 
  5. After pack meeting clean up. 
Play a game that requires at least 2 teams with your den, or two other family members. Afterwards discuss what it means to be part of a team and what makes a good team member.
Tiger Charades
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Play a game of charades with your den.

  • 3”x5” index cards 
  • Pen 
  • Large basket 
  • Timer 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Become familiar with how to play charades. 
  2. Write down items that will be used for charades on the index cards. 
    • A Lion 
    • A Tiger 
    • A Wolf 
    • A Bear 
    • A Scout 
    • Going on a camping trip 
    • Going on a hike 
    • Starting a fire 
    • Being friendly 
    • Being brave 
    • Being clean 
  3. Mix cards up and place in basket 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide the den into two teams, including adult partners. 
  2. Review how to play charades. 
  3. Keep the rules simple.   
  4. The first team picks someone to go first.  That Cub Scout picks a card from the cards in the basket and looks at what is on it without showing it to anyone.   
  5. Set the timer for 2 minutes. 
  6. The Cub Scout does their best to act out what is on the card.  Their team tries to guess what it is before the timer dings.  If they guess correctly in time, they get a point.  If they do not guess, the card goes back into the basket. 
  7. The second team then selects a card from the basket. 
  8. Continue going back and forth until all the cards have been selected.
Tiger Volleyball
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Play a game of Tiger Volleyball.

  • Backyard volleyball net set to 5 ft. in height  
  • 14-inch inflatable beach ball  
  • 4 orange sports cones

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the USA Volleyball website and become familiar with the simplified youth rules of volleyball.  
  2. Modify the size of the court to fit the number of Cub Scouts and adult partners in your den. 
  3. Set up the volleyball net and court in an area that is free of hazards.  Use the orange sports cone to mark the corners of the court. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide the den into two teams, including adult partners. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Discuss what it means to be part of a team and ask Cub Scouts what they will do to be good members of their team.  
  4. Review how to play Tiger volleyball. 
  5. Keep the rules simple.   
  6. The objective is to score a point by the beach ball landing on the opponent’s side of the court. 
  7. A team cannot hit the ball more than four times and a player cannot hit it more than once at a time, if they do the other team gets a point. 
  8. If the ball goes out of bounds the team that didn’t touch the ball last gets a point. 
  9. Cub Scouts and adult partners play Tiger volleyball.   
  10. Look for opportunities to recognize good sportsmanship.  
Tiger Wiffle Ball
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Play a game of wiffle ball with the den.

  • Wiffle ball 
  • Wiffle ball bat 
  • Clipboard 
  • Paper 
  • Pencil 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Visit the Wiffle Ball website and become familiar with the rules of Wiffle ball.  
  2. Set up an area free of hazards for the Wiffle ball field. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide the den into two teams, including adult partners. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why following rules in a game is important.  Ask Cub Scouts which points of the Scout Law they should follow when they are playing a game and why. 
  3. Discuss what it means to be part of a team and ask Cub Scouts what they will do to be good members of their team.  
  4. Review how to play Wiffle ball. 
  5. One team plays the outfield and the other is at bat. 
  6. The rules are similar to baseball but there are no bases to run.  Bases are earned based on the distance the ball lands if it is not caught. 
  7. Track the bases and points on a piece of paper. 
  8. Play at least two innings.
Participate in a service project.
Board Game Collection
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time4

Collect game boards for a community center.

  • 18” x 14” x 12” cardboard boxes, one for each collection site 
  • 11” x 17” pieces of paper, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Markers and crayons, enough to share 

This activity will take one den meeting and two pack meetings.  The den meeting for Cub Scouts to decorate boxes and flyers for the game board drive.  The pack meetings to distribute the flyers and one pack meeting to collect the board games.   

During the meeting: 

  1. Inform Cub Scouts that they will be conducting a sock drive and the name receiving organization. Include who the organization serves and the need for socks. 
  2. Explain that today the den will decorate donation boxes and make promotional flyers to hand out at the next pack meeting. 
  3. Explain that the collection boxes and flyers should include the date of the next pack meeting when the board games will be collected, and the organization that will receive the board games. 

At the next pack meeting: 

  1. Cub Scouts greet fellow Cub Scouts and collect board games placing them in the collection boxes. 
  2. Ask the Cubmaster to recognize the den for their project. 

After the pack meeting: 

  1. Deliver the donated games to the agreed-upon facility.
Sock Drive
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time4

Sock drive service project.

  • 18” x 14” x 12” cardboard boxes, one for each collection site 
  • 11” x 17” pieces of paper, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Markers and crayons, enough to share

This activity will take two meetings.  One will be for Cub Scouts to decorate boxes and posters for the sock drive.  The other will be collecting and donating the socks.  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Identify a local homeless or transitional shelter that takes clothing donations.  Meet with them to discuss conducting a sock drive. Identify details and dates. 
  2. Share details of the drive with all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Inform Cub Scouts that they will be conducting a sock drive and the name receiving organization. Include who the organization serves and the need for socks. 
  2. Explain that today the den will decorate donation boxes and make promotional posters. 
  3. Explain that the posters and collection boxes should include the date when the socks will be collected, the pack number and den, and the organization that will receive the socks. 

After the meeting: 

  1. Deliver the donation boxes to the agreed-upon collection locations. 
  2. After one week collect the boxes and deliver them to the recipient organization. 
  3. At the next pack meeting ask Cubmaster to recognize the den for their project.
Tiger Scouting for Food
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Participate in your Council-sponsored Scouting for Food event.

  • Activity Consent Form 
  • Collection bags provide by local council 
  • Vehicle to carry collected food such as a truck or van 
  • Map of area to distribute bags and collect food donations 
  • Check with local council for any additional items 

Before the Meeting: 

  1. Contact your local Council to participate in Scouting for Food collection event. 
  2. Review council provided materials for Scouting for Food event. 
  3. Communicate the details to the parents and legal guardians of your Cub Scouts. 
  4. Distribute Activity Consent Form to the patrol. 
  5. Confirm with local council the area to distribute bags and collect food donations. 
  6. Confirm with local council the location of drop off for donations. 
  7. Get collection bags provided by local council. 
  8. Communicate date, time, and location for bag distribution to the patrol. 
  9. Communicate date, time, and location for food collection distribution to the patrol. 
  10. Refer to your council-provided resources for any additional items to be completed before the event. 

During collection bag distribution: 

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout. 
  2. Create buddies. 
  3. Assign area for buddies to distribute collection bags. 
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely as they distribute collection bags. 
  5. Remind Cub Scouts that it is illegal to place collection bags in or on mailboxes. 

During food donation collection: 

  1. Collect Activity Consent Form for each Cub Scout. 
  2. Create buddies. 
  3. Assign area for buddies to collect donations. 
  4. Review how to approach residences safely and politely if there is no donated food left out. 
  5. Take donated food to the assigned collection point. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Watch this video about Service Projects in Cub Scouting (6:44)

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.) 

Before starting this Adventure complete the following: 

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist  to plan your den or pack service project. 
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects. 

During the Adventure 

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults. 
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.  
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines. 

Lion and Tiger use of paint brushes – The project tool use indicates a restriction on Lions and Tigers using paint brushes.  This is in the context of a service project and not for craft-related projects.  A service project that requires painting is likely above the skill level of a Lion or Tiger.  Painting for arts and crafts is allowed and encouraged for Lions and Tigers.

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