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Tiger Bites

Required Adventure

In this Adventure, Tigers will explore the different food groups, have fun being active, and the importance of rest.

Requirements

Identify the 5 different food groups.
Food Group Tiger Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Relay race to identify food items and the food group they belong to.

Based on the number of Cub Scouts and adult partners in our den you may want to adjust the amount of supplies for this activity.  

  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are vegetables 
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are fruits 
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are proteins 
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are grains 
  • 3 plastic or toy foods that are dairy 
  • 5 small boxes, approximately 2’x2’x2’ 
  • Black marker 
  • A pillowcase 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.  
  2. Set up an area clear of obstacles to conduct a relay race. 
  3. Label one box for each food group; vegetables, fruits, proteins, grains, and dairy.  
  4. Line up the five boxes in a row. 
  5. Place all the plastic or toy foods into a pillowcase. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Introduce the five different food groups and what types of food are in each group. 
  2. Divide the den, Cub Scouts, and adult partners, into two teams. 
  3. Have each team form a line 5 yards away from the five boxes. 
  4. Explain the rules of the relay 
  5. The first person on each team reaches into the pillowcase and picks one item and then runs to the food group boxes and places the item in the correct box.  If the item is placed in the correct box, they return to the line and the next person on the team goes.  If the item is placed in the wrong box, the person takes it out of the box they placed it in and places it in the correct box, they repeat until the item is in the right box. 
  6. The first team to have all members of the team place an item correctly and return to the line wins. 
My Favorite Foods
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts draw their favorite food for each of the five good groups.

  • Tiger handbook, page 19 
  • Crayons, enough to share 
  • Images of foods that are in the five different food groups 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.  
  2. Set up the meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity in the handbook. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Introduce the five different food groups and what types of food are in each group. 
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to identify a food that they like for each of the food groups and draw it in their handbook. 
My Favorite Snack
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts bring and share their favorite food from one of the five food groups.

  • My Favorite Snack adult partner guide found in Additional Resources 
  • Tiger handbook, page 19 
  • Crayons, enough to share 
  • Images of foods that are in the five different food groups. 
  • Cub Scouts bring their favorite food from one of the five food groups. 
  • Plates 
  • Napkins 
  • Access to hand washing area 
  • Cups 
  • Drinking water 
  • Forks or toothpicks 
  • Instructions for adult partners to prepare for the meeting 
  • Cleaning supplies to wipe down eating areas before and after the meeting. 
  • Table for serving food samples 
  • Tables and chairs for Cub Scouts and adult partners to eat at 
  • 5 – 3” x 5” index cards 
  • Marker 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Using the USDA MyPlate, become familiar with the types of food that are in the five different food groups.  
  2. Review the “My Favorite Snack” adult partner guide.  Make any necessary edits based on your den and send to all parents and adult partners in the den at least two weeks before the den meeting.  You may need to adjust how many different types of food you ask each Cub Scout to bring based on the size of your den.   
  3. Send a reminder to adult partners a week prior to the meeting. 
  4. Send a reminder to adult partners a day prior to the meeting. 
  5. Confirm that at least one food item from each of the five food groups will be available.  
  6. Prepare the meeting space to have food samples and a place for everyone to eat. 
  7. Clean surfaces where food will be. 
  8. Use the 3”x5” index cards to make labels for the five different food groups. 
  9. Space the index cards on the table to label where Cub Scouts and adult partners are to place their food. 

During the meeting: 

  1. As Cub Scouts and adult partners bring in the food have them place it on the table in the appropriate food group the item belongs to. 
  2. Have each Cub Scout and adult partner talk about their food item and what food group it belongs to. 

My Favorite Snack adult partner guide

Healthy Snacking with MyPlate

Practice hand washing. Point out when you should wash your hands.
Scout Oath and Law Hand Washing
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Proper handwashing and learning how long it takes to do a good job.

Before the meeting: 

  1. Confirm a meeting location that has a sink for Cub Scouts to wash their hands. 
  2. Review content about washing hands from the CDC Handwashing in Communities: Clean Hands Save Lives website. 
  3. Set up a handwashing station with soap and paper towels. 
  4. Print out the “Wash Your Hands” poster and place it at the handwashing station. 
  5. Print out the “Know When to Wash Your Hands at School” poster and place it at the handwashing station. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask when you should wash your hands.  Give everyone who wants to share a chance to answer.  Review any item that wasn’t mentioned. 
    • After you go to the bathroom 
    • After you play with a dog, a cat, or other animal 
    • After you blow your nose, sneeze, or cough 
    • After you touch garbage 
    • Before and after you help to prepare food 
    • Before you handle plates, utensils, or cups 
    • Before you eat 
    • When your hands have dirt on them  
    • When your hands have been touching a lot of things that others have touched 
  2. Bring Cub Scouts over to the handwashing station to demonstrate how to wash your hands. 
    • Put your hands under clean, running water.  Put soap on your hands. Turn off the water. 
    • Rub your hands together palm to palm.  They should get sudsy.   
    • With your left palm facing down, place your right hand on top of your left and interlock your finger. Scrub vigorously to clean the space between your fingers. Switch hands and repeat. 
    • With your right hand, grab your left thumb and rotate your hand around it. Switch hands and repeat. 
    • Take the tips of your fingers and press them into your opposite palm, rotating them around the palm in a circular motion. Switch hands and repeat. 
    • Rinse the soap from your hands, grab a towel or paper towel and then use it to turn the faucet off. 
  3. After you have demonstrated the steps to washing hands inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that the time it takes to do all these steps should be the time it takes for you to say the Scout Oath and Scout Law. 
  4. Have each Cub Scout take a turn washing their hands following the steps as they recite the Scout Oath and Scout Law. 
Be active for 30 minutes.
Tiger Obstacle Course
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time4

Obstacle Course.

Once the items for this obstacle course are built, they can be used by other dens or the pack for years to come.  

  • 7 – 10ft. long 1” PVC pipes cut into the following lengths
    • 9 – 3ft. long 1” PVC pipes
    • 6 – 2ft. long 1” PVC pipes
    • 10 – 1ft. long 1” PVC pipes
  • 10 – 1” PVC 90-degree elbow connectors
  • 10 – 1” PVC Schedule 40 S x S x S Tee
  • 2   –  8ft. long pressure treated 2”x4”
  • 6   –  Hula Hoops™
  • Smartphone or stopwatch

Before the meeting:

  1. Construct 3 low hurdles for Cub Scouts to jump over.
    • Connect a 90-degree elbow connector to each end of a 3ft. long pipe
    • Connect 2ft. long pipes to each end of the 90-degree elbow connector of the 3ft. long pipe, forming three sides of a rectangle.
    • Connect PVC schedule 40 S x S x S Tee to the bottom of the 2ft. long pipes
    • Insert the 1ft. long pipes into the PVC schedule 40 S x S x S Tee to create a hurdle.
  2. Construct 2 high bars for Cub Scouts to duck under.
    • Connect a 90-degree elbow connector to each end of a 3ft. long pipe
    • Connect 3ft. long pipes to each end of the 90-degree elbow connector of the 3ft. long pipe, forming three sides of a rectangle.
    • Connect PVC schedule 40 S x S x S Tee to the bottom of the 2ft. long pipes
    • Insert the 1ft. long pipes into the PVC schedule 40 S x S x S Tee to create a hurdle.
  3. Layout the obstacle course.
    • Find a location that is level and free of tripping hazards to lay out obstacles.
    • The layout of the course may be in a single line, or you may add turns to accommodate the space available.
    • From the starting line place a low hurdle 10 ft. away, next place a high bar 10 ft. away, next place a low hurdle 10 ft. away, next place a high bar 10 ft. away, next place a low hurdle 10 ft. away.
    • Place one of the 2”x4” on the ground 10 ft. away from the last low hurdle.
    • Place the 6 Hula Hoops™ in a straight-line end to end 10 ft. away from the 2”x4”.
    • Place the other 2”x4” on the ground 10 ft. away from the Hula Hoops™.
    • Create a finish line 10ft. away from the 2”x4”.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts gather at the obstacle course.
  2. Demonstrate how to run the course. Jump over the low hurdle, duck under the high bar, jump over the low hurdle, duck under the high bar, jump over the low hurdle, walk across the 2”x4”, go through the Hula Hoops™ by jumping from one to the next, walk across the 2”x4”, then to the finish line.
  3. Give each Cub Scout a turn to run the obstacle course and record how fast they did it.
  4. Allow each Cub Scout to run the course at least twice to see if they can improve their time.
Tiger Red Light Green Light
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Play Red Light / Green Light.

  • Cub Scouts and adult partners

Before the meeting: 

  1. Prepare the meeting location for a place to play red light / green light free of obstacles.  
  2. Become familiar with how to play red light / green light. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners form a line side by side about 2 ft. apart from each other. 
  2. Explain the rules of how to play red light / green light. 
  3. Stand 20 feet away from the Cub Scouts and adult partners with your back turned to them. 
  4. When you shout, “green light” Cub Scouts and adult partners move towards you. 
  5. When you shout “red light” turn around and anyone who is still moving must go back to the beginning. 
  6. The game is won by the person who reaches you first. 
  7. The winner of the game gets to be the one who calls for the next game. 
Tiger Soccer
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play Soccer with the Den.

  • 10 orange sports cones 
  • Youth-sized soccer ball 

Keep the rules of this soccer game simple.  Some youth may play on a team and want to play by other rules. The purpose of this activity is for the Cub Scouts and adult partners to be active and play the game following the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Prepare the soccer field that is free of obstacles and place four orange sports cones to make a rectangle that is 45ft. by 75ft.  or 75ft. by 105ft.  
  2. Place two cones, one on each end of the field, to designate the middle of the field. 
  3. Place two cones on each end that are 6ft. wide apart to form the goals. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners to explain the rules of soccer and discuss good sportsmanship. 
  2. Ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what parts of the Scout Law are important to keep in mind when playing a game. 
  3. The objective is to get the ball in the opposing teams goal. 
  4. You may not touch the ball with your hands.  There will be no goalie in this game.  Someone may defend the goal, but they may not use their hands. 
  5. If the ball goes out of bounds the team that did not touch it last gets to throw the ball back into play. 
  6. When a goal is scored the ball will be placed in the middle of the field and the team that did not score the goal gets to kick off. 
  7. Tripping, kicking, or pushing other players is not allowed.   
  8. Divide the den into two teams including adult partners. 
  9. Play soccer, during the game look for opportunities to recognize good sportsmanship.  
Practice methods that help you sleep.
Tiger Get Ready for Bed
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Make a bedtime routine to help get enough sleep using the activity in the Tiger handbook.

  • Tiger handbook, page 20 
  • Crayons, enough to share 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Review content at the CDC Do Your Children Get Enough Sleep? website.  
  2. Share the link to the CDC Do Your Children Get Enough Sleep? poster with adult partners.  Let them know that at the next meeting you will be discussing the importance of sleep.  
  3. Set up the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 20 of the Tiger handbook. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners. 
  2. As Cub Scouts and adult partners why do they think getting enough sleep is important. 
  3. Share with the den that one way to make sure you get enough sleep is to have a routine of things you do to get ready for bed. 
  4. Have adult partners review each of the items on page 20 of the Tiger activity that Cub Scouts can do to get ready for bed. Have the Cub Scouts color each item. 
Tiger Time to Sleep
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts with their parent or legal guardian establish a good bedtime.

  • No supplies are needed

Before the meeting: 

  1. Review content at the CDC Do Your Children Get Enough Sleep? website.  
  2. Share the link to the CDC Do Your Children Get Enough Sleep? poster with adult partners.  Let them know that at the next meeting you will be discussing the importance of sleep.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners. 
  2. As Cub Scouts and adult partners why do they think getting enough sleep is important. 
  3. Share with the den that one way to make sure you get enough sleep is to set a time when you go to bed. 
  4. Have adult partners discuss with their Cub Scouts when they have to wake up and have enough time to get ready for school based on the need for them to get 9 to 12 hours of sleep. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before starting this Adventure: 

  • Review the Food Allergies safety moment. 
  • Review each Cub Scouts BSA Annual Health and Medical Record for any food allergies or restrictions.  
  • Ask if any member of the den, youth, or adult, has any religious, or cultural dietary concerns. 
  • there is someone in the den, youth, or adults, who carries an EpiPen due to severe allergies make sure that at least one other adult knows how to administer the EpiPen. To learn more, review this Safety Moment on anaphylaxis 
  • Review the Keep Your Food Safe guide to properly keep, store, and prepare food.

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