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Tiger Circles

Required Adventure

It is important to know that the BSA has a religious element as a part of the program as stated in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. However, the BSA is absolutely nonsectarian in its attitude toward a member’s religion or faith.  The BSA policy is that the home and organization or group with which the member is connected shall give definite attention to religious life. 

In this Adventure, the Tigers learn about their family by exploring the faith traditions and celebrations that make being part of their family special. Tigers may earn this Adventure by completing the requirements for the Adventure OR by earning the religious emblem of their choosing. 

This Adventure is commonly done at home with the Cub Scout’s family.  If it is being done as a den ensure that every parent and guardian is aware of the content and the activities that the den will do and allow for parents to opt out of doing it as a den activity and choose to complete the requirement at home. 

Requirements

Family & Reverence Adventure This Adventure may be earned by completing the requirements below OR by completing a Religious Emblem of the Cub Scouts family’s choosing.
With your parent or legal guardian talk about your family’s faith traditions. Identify three holidays or celebrations that are part of your family’s faith traditions. Draw a picture of your favorite family’s faith tradition holiday or celebration.
Tiger Holiday Drawing
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Draw and color a favorite faith tradition holiday or celebration. 

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 25 
  • Crayons 

At Home Option 

  1. Discuss with your Cub Scout your family’s faith traditions that are connected to your religious beliefs.   
  2. Together with your Cub Scout draw your favorite religious holiday, religious celebration, or family faith tradition. Some family traditions are things your family may do together during these times that are not directly connected to your religious beliefs. For others, it may be cooking a certain type of food, playing a certain game, or singing certain songs. 

Den Meeting Option 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Create a space for Cub Scouts to draw and color. 

 During the meeting: 

  1. Share with Cub Scouts that a Cub Scout is reverent and that means that they are faithful to their religious obligations and respect the beliefs of others. 
  2. Share with Cub Scouts that religious holidays or celebrations are times for families and communities to come together. There are also family traditions that are connected to these events. This may include cooking a type of food, playing a special game, or singing certain songs. 
  3. Ask the Cub Scouts to think about their family’s faith traditions and draw a picture of it.  
  4. After everyone has completed their drawing, allow time for sharing. 
With your family, attend a religious service OR other gathering that shows how your family expresses Family & Reverence.
Tiger Religious Celebration
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts attend a religious celebration with their family.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 26 
  • Crayons 

Many religions and faiths have celebrations based on major life events such as birth, coming of age, and getting married.  The celebration you attend does not have to be the same as your family’s faith.  

 Before the celebration 

  1. Cub Scout and parent(s) discuss the celebration they will attend.
     

    • What is being celebrated?  
    • How does the celebration connect with that religion or faith? 
    • How often is the celebration?  
  2. Have Cub Scout complete activity on page 26 of their Tiger handbook.  

During the celebration   

  1. Cub Scouts attend a religious celebration with their parent(s). 
  2. After the celebration Cub Scout and parent(s) discuss what they took away from the service.
     

    • How did it make you feel? 
    • Is there something that inspired you?  
    • What parts of the celebration did they like the most? 
Tiger Religious Service
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Attend a religious service with your family.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 26 
  • Crayons 

Before the service

  1. Cub Scout and parent(s) discuss the service they will attend
     

    • What is the significance of this service? 
    • How often is this service performed? 
    • Is the service divided into different parts? If so, what are they? 
  2. Have Cub Scout complete the activity on page 26 of the Tiger Handbook. 

During the service

  1. Cub Scouts attend a religious service with their parent(s). 
  2. After service Cub Scout and parent(s) discuss what they took away from the service
     

    • How did it make you feel? 
    • Is there something that inspired you?  
    • What parts of the service did they like the most?  
Tiger Veterans Day
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Attend a Veterans Day event with your den

Before the meeting: 

  1. Veterans Day is November 11th because World War I officially ended on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. Veterans Day honors those who served in the military.  This is different from Memorial Day where those who served and died are honored.  
  2. Identify Veterans Day activities in your community that your den can attend. 
  3. Notify parents and guardians of the activity, date, time, and location. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and explain what Veterans Day is about. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts what are some ways they can show their appreciation to a veteran. 
  3. Attend the Veterans Day activity. 
  4. Afterwards ask Cub Scouts what they liked best about the activity. 
Carry out an act of kindness.
Tiger A Note of Kindness
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Make a card of kindness to give to someone special  

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 27 
  • Crayons, enough to share 
  • Scissors  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Set up the meeting space for Cub Scouts to complete activity on page 27 of the Tiger Handbook.

During the meeting: 

  1. Ask Cub Scouts things that they can do to be kind to other people.  
  2. Share that one way to be kind is to give someone a card that tells them how special they are to you. 
  3. Have Cub Scouts make cards using page 27 of the Tiger handbook. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts cut out the card with help from their adult partner. 
  5. Ask adult partners to help the Cub Scout send the card to the person they made it for. 
  6. Encourage Cub Scouts to always look for opportunities to perform acts of kindness and that being kind is part of being a Cub Scout because it is in the Scout Law.
Tiger Be Kind at Home
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts perform an act of kindness at home.

  • No supplies needed 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Ask Cub Scouts at a prior meeting what are some ways they can show kindness at home.  
  2. At a prior meeting give Cub Scouts the assignment to conduct an act of kindness at home. 

During the meeting: 

  1. At the next meeting have Cub Scouts share their act of kindness and how it made them feel.  
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to always look for opportunities to perform acts of kindness and that being kind is part of being a Cub Scout because it is in the Scout Law. 
Tiger Be Kind at School
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts show kindness at school by inviting someone who is alone to join them.

  • No supplies needed 

Before the meeting: 

  1. At a prior meeting give Cub Scouts the assignment to conduct an act of kindness at school. 
  2. Describe that this could be asking someone who is sitting alone at lunch to join them or someone who is alone on the playground to join them. 

 During the meeting: 

  1. At the next meeting have Cub Scouts share their act of kindness and how it made them feel.  
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to always look for opportunities to perform acts of kindness and that being kind is part of being a Cub Scout because it is in the Scout Law. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.) 

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