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Tiger’s Roar

Required Adventure

In partnership with the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center Foundation, Tigers will learn about the “Protect Yourself Rules” and other skills needed to stay safe. 

Requirements

With permission from your parent or legal guardian watch the Protect Yourself Rules video for the Tiger rank.
Protect Yourself Rules Video Tiger
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Watch the Protect Yourself Rules video with your parent or legal guardian. 

  • Parent Notification found in Additional Resources 
  • Computer or smart device 
  • Internet connection to view the “The Protect Yourself Rules-Tigers” video (duration 13 minutes) 
  • Or download video onto device if internet is not available where you will be watching.  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Tiger’s Roar 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section. 

 During the meeting or at home: 

  1. Parent or legal guardian watch the ”Protect Yourself Rules” video with their Cub Scout. 

Tiger’s Roar 1 Parent Notification

With your Tiger adult partner, demonstrate Shout, Run, Tell as explained in the Protect Yourself Rules video.
Shout, Run, Tell Relay
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List1
Prep Time1

A relay race where Cub Scouts will demonstrate Shout, Run, Tell.  

  • Parent Notification found in Additional Resources 
  • At least 4 Cub Scouts 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Review the BSA Youth Protection content.   
  2. Review The Protect Yourself Rules-Tigers video.   
  3. Inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Tiger’s Roar Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners 
  2. Have Cub Scouts line up single file with each youth about 10 yards away from their adult partner.  
  3. Explain how to play the relay. 
  4. Give the signal “Go,” the first Cub Scout in line will yell something like “No!” or “Stay away from me!” or anything else they would say if someone did something that made them feel uncomfortable. This is practicing the “Shout” part of Shout, Run, Tell. 
  5. The first Cub Scout will then run to their adult partner. This is practicing the “Run” part of Shout, Run, Tell. 
  6. When they arrive at their adult partner they say, “I need to tell you something.”  This is practicing the “Tell” part of Shout, Run, Tell.   
  7. The next Cub Scout gets a turn. Repeat until all the Cub Scouts have had a chance to practice how they would Shout, Run and Tell.  During this activity, allow each Cub Scout to come up with what they want to shout. 
With your Tiger adult partner, demonstrate how to access emergency services.
Emergency Services 911 Relay Race
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Emergency Services 911 Safety Relay

  • Tiger handbook, page 23 
  • Pencil or pen 
  • 3”x5” index cards 
  • marker 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Inform adult partners to come with the names and phone numbers of five trusted adults.  These trusted adults should have been identified in the Bobcat requirement for the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Child from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide”. 
  2. Set up the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity on page 23 of the Tiger Handbook. 
  3. Set up an area free of obstacles to conduct a relay race. 
  4. Secure additional adult leadership to assist with relay race. 
  5. Make two sets of cards for the relay race.  On a 3”x5” index card writes one scenario below.  On the front write the scenario on the back write the answer. 
    • If you see someone breaking into a car?  (yes) 
    • If your brother or sister breaks your toy? (no) 
    • If you are with a friend and they fall and are bleeding a lot? (yes) 
    • If you fall down and scrap your elbow? (no) 
    • If you see a building on fire? (yes) 
    • If you can’t find your homework? (no) 
    • If you see a car get into an accident? (yes) 
    • If a stranger approaches you and asks you to get in their car? (yes) 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts open their handbook to page 23. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts if they know how to contact emergency services using a smartphone.  
  3. Ask adult partners to pull out their smartphones and show their Cub Scout how to access emergency services using their phones.  If an adult partner does not have a smart phone have them demonstrate how to dial 911 on the activity sheet.  
  4. Discuss when it is appropriate to call emergency services, 911, and what to expect when they call.
    Police officers, firefighters, and EMTs are busy helping people with real emergencies, it is important never to call 911 except in a real emergency.
    If you need to call 911, remember:  

    • Always know where you are. 
    • Do not hang up! 
    • Answer all the dispatcher’s questions. The dispatcher is the person who answers the phone. 
    • Never be afraid to call if you have a real emergency. They can help you at any time of the day or night.  
  5. Divide the den into two teams, including adult partners.  The teams each create a single file line.  20 feet away the den leader and one other adult stand with a deck of scenarios cards.  On the signal, the first person for each team will run to their assigned adult who has a deck of scenario cards.  The adult will show the scenario (and read it for Cub Scouts) and the person has to say yes or no if they should call 911.  If they get it correct, they run back to their team and sit down.  If they get it wrong, they run back to their team and they must go again, they repeat until they get it right.  The first team to have everyone sitting wins.  
  6. After the relay race, ask adult partners to then discuss the five trusted adults with their Cub Scout and write their phone numbers on the activity sheet.  
Smart Phone Emergency Services
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Teach Cub Scouts how to use a smart phone to reach emergency services (911) 

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 23 
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Inform adult partners to come with the names and phone numbers of 5 trusted adults.  These trusted adults should have been identified in the Bobcat requirement for the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Child from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide”. 
  2. Set up the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity on page 23 of the Tiger Handbook. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts open their Tiger handbook to page 23. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts if they know how to contact emergency services using a smartphone.  
  3. Ask adult partners to pull out their smartphones and show their Cub Scout how to access emergency services using their phones. If an adult partner does not have a smart phone have them demonstrate how to dial 911 on the activity sheet.  
  4. Discuss when it is appropriate to call emergency services, 911, and what to expect when they call.
    Police officers, firefighters, and EMTs are busy helping people with real emergencies, it is important never to call 911 except in a real emergency.
    If you need to call 911, remember:  

    • Always know where you are. 
    • Do not hang up! 
    • Answer all the dispatcher’s questions. The dispatcher is the person who answers the phone. 
    • Never be afraid to call if you have a real emergency. They can help you at any time of the day or night.
  5. Ask the following questions and have Cub Scouts raise their hand if they think they should call 911.  
    • If you see someone breaking into a car?  (yes) 
    • If your brother or sister breaks your toy? (no) 
    • If you are with a friend and they fall and are bleeding a lot? (yes) 
    • If you fall down and scrap your elbow? (no) 
    • If you see a building on fire? (yes) 
    • If you can’t find your homework? (no) 
    • If you see a car, get into an accident? (yes) 
    • If a stranger approaches you and asks you to get in their car? (yes)
       
  6. Ask adult partners to discuss the five trusted adults with their Cub Scout. Write their phone numbers on the activity sheet.  
Voice Activated Devices Emergency Services
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Teach your Cub Scout how to use your home voice-activated devices to contact emergency services 

This activity is designed to be done at home that already has voice-activated devices so a Cub Scout knows how to use the device in the case of an emergency.  

  • A voice-activated device such as Amazon Alexa or a voice-activated security system 
  • Tiger handbook, page 23 
  • Pencil or pen 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Be familiar with the device you own and how to contact emergency services with it. 
  2. The names and phone numbers of five trusted adults.  These trusted adults should have been identified in the Bobcat requirement for the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Child from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide”. 

During the meeting 

  1. Have your Cub Scout open their Tiger handbook to page 23. 
  2. Ask your Cub Scout if they know how to contact emergency services using a smartphone.  
  3. Demonstrate, without actually calling 911, your Cub Scout how to access emergency services using the voice-activated device.   
  4. Discuss when it is appropriate to call emergency services, 911, and what to expect when they call.
    Police officers, firefighters, and EMTs are busy helping people with real emergencies, it is important never to call 911 except in a real emergency.
    If you need to call 911, remember:  

    • Always know where you are. 
    • Do not hang up! 
    • Answer all the dispatcher’s questions. The dispatcher is the person who answers the phone. 
    • Never be afraid to call if you have a real emergency. They can help you at any time of the day or night.  
  5. Ask the following questions and have Cub Scouts raise their hand if they think they should call 911.
     

    • If you see someone breaking into a car?  (yes) 
    • If your brother or sister breaks your toy? (no) 
    • If you are with a friend and they fall and are bleeding a lot? (yes) 
    • If you fall down and scrap your elbow? (no) 
    • If you see a building on fire? (yes) 
    • If you can’t find your homework? (no) 
    • If you see a car, get into an accident? (yes) 
    • If a stranger approaches you and asks you to get in their car? (yes)
  6. Discuss the five trusted adults with your Cub Scout and write their phone numbers on the activity sheet.  
With your Tiger adult partner, demonstrate that you know what to do if you get lost or separated.
Emergency Whistle Testing
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts will blow whistles and demonstrate how to use the whistle if they get lost.

  • Cub Scouts bring their whistle which is part of their Cub Scout Six Essentials 
  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 24 
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners to bring a whistle.  If you have already completed the Tigers In the Wild Adventure, have them bring their whistle which is part of their Cub Scout Six Essentials.  If you have not completed the Tigers in the Wild Adventure, inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that having a whistle will be part of other Adventures and something they bring with them whenever participating in outdoor activities.  
  2. Ensure the location for this activity is in a place where the blowing of whistles will not be a problem.  
  3. Prepare a space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work on the activity in their Tiger handbook. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and check to make sure everyone has their whistle. 
  2. Ask Cub Scouts why they think it is important to have a whistle with them. 
  3. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that at times a person may get separated from the group they are with when they are outside.   
  4. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that if they ever get separated from the group they are with or get lost, there are three things they can do to increase the chances that they will get found.  
    • Stay – Do not go looking or wandering around.  When you get lost or separated your group or parents are likely to start looking for you in the last place, they saw you or at places you have been.  If you stay where you are, chances are they will come back to that place to look for you. 
    • Answer – When you hear your name being called, answer back.   
    • Whistle – Use your whistle.  Blow your whistle with three short blasts.  Do this repeatedly until you are found.
       
  5. Ask Cub Scouts, how do you know if your whistle works?  Allow for answers. 
  6. Now is the time to test your whistle, I want you to blow your whistle with three short blasts and then stop. 
  7. Allow Cub Scouts to blow their whistles.  
  8. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them complete the activity on page 24 of the Tiger handbook. 
Hide and Seek
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

A twist on hide and seek where after 5 minutes Cub Scouts use methods learned to be found. 

  • Cub Scouts bring their whistle which is part of their Cub Scout Six Essentials 
  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, page 24 
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Identify a large area outside that has places to hide and is free of obstacles.  
  2. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners to bring a whistle.  If you have already completed the Tigers In the Wild Adventure, have them bring their whistle which is part of their Cub Scout Six Essentials.  If you have not completed the Tigers in the Wild Adventure, inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that having a whistle will be part of other Adventures and something they bring with them whenever participating in outdoor activities.  

During the meeting:

  1. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that if they ever get separated from the group they are with or get lost, there are three things they can do to increase the chances that they will get found.  
    • Stay – Do not go looking or wandering around.  When you get lost or separated your group or parents are likely to start looking for you in the last place, they saw you or at places you have been.  If you stay where you are, chances are they will come back to that place to look for you. 
    • Answer – When you hear your name being called, answer back.   
    • Whistle – Use your whistle.  Blow your whistle with three short blasts.  Do this repeatedly until you are found.  
  2. Explain the rules of hide, seek, and found
     

    • This game is like hide and seek but after 5 minutes the team that is hiding follows the stay, answer, and whistle.  S.A.W. 
    • A Cub Scout and their adult partner will be the first to hide.  They will be given 30 seconds to find a place to hide.  After 30 seconds the rest of the den will look for them.  Cub Scouts and adult partners stick together as they search. 
    • If they are found the Cub Scout and adult partner who found them get to hide next. 
    • If the Cub Scout and adult partner who are hiding cannot be found after 3 minutes, the den leader blows a whistle once.  Now the Cub Scout and adult partner who are hiding have to stay, answer, and whistle. 
    • The team that finds them first gets to hide next.
       
  3. After playing the game ask the Cub Scouts was it easier to find someone when they were following stay, answer, and whistle.  
  4. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them complete the activity on page 24 of the Tiger handbook. 
Pinewood Derby Driver’s License
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List5
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts create a Pinewood Derby driver’s license that doubles as an ID card.  

  • 20” x 30” project board 
  • Colored markers 
  • Scissors  
  • Camera 
  • Printer  
  • Laptop computer  
  • White card stock paper 8.5” x 11” 
  • Self-sealing laminating pouches that will fit 3.5” x 2” card stock 
  • Pinewood Derby Driver’s License, found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer  
  • Black magic markers, one for each Cub Scout 
  • Poster putty or sticky putty 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Make a Pinewood Derby Driver’s License:  
    • Use the project board and decorate it like a driver’s license for your state. 
    • Keep an 11” x 8.5” horizontal space empty, this is where the Cub Scout ID form for each Cub Scout will be placed. 
    • Cut out the space where the photo would be.  
  2. Confirm the meeting location has a place for the printer and laptop to be plugged in. 
  3. Create a space with good lighting to take photos and set up camera and driver’s license cut out. 
  4. Print Pinewood Derby Driver’s License, one for each Cub Scout. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that at times a person may get separated from the group they are with when they are outside.   
  2. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that if they ever get separated from the group they are with or get lost, there are three things they can do to increase the chances that they will get found.  
    • Stay – Do not go looking or wandering around.  When you get lost or separated your group or parents are likely to start looking for you in the last place, they saw you or at places you have been.  If you stay where you are, chances are they will come back to that place to look for you. 
    • Answer – When you hear your name being called, answer back.   
    • Whistle – Use your whistle.  Blow your whistle with three short blasts.  Do this repeatedly until you are found.  
  3. Sometimes we may get separated and we may not be able to remember important information like our parent’s phone number or our address.   
  4. Inform Cub Scouts that today you are making special IDs.  These IDs will have important information on them in case they get lost, but it will also serve as their license for the upcoming Pinewood Derby.  
  5. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners complete the Cub Scout ID form, using the black magic marker.  Make sure they write big and clear. 
  6. Once a Cub Scout has their form completed have them step over to the photo area with their Cub Scout ID form. 
  7. Place sticky putty on the back side of the Cub Scout ID form on the four corners and place it on the Driver’s License.  
  8. Have the adult partner hold the driver’s license up and have the Cub Scout place their head in the cut-out area. 
  9. Take a picture of the driver’s license with the Cub Scout in it.  Repeat this for each Cub Scout. 
  10. Upload photos to the laptop and size them to 3.5” x 2” horizontal.  Place 8 different photos onto an 8.5” x 11” sheet of paper. 
  11. Print the photos onto card stock paper.  Cut out individual driver’s licenses and laminate. 
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.  

Before starting this Adventure: 

  • Review the  BSA Youth Protection content.  
  • Review the Protect Yourself Rules-Tiger video.   
  • This Adventure may be completed at home or as a den.  Prior to the meeting inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Tiger’s Roar 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1. 

During the Adventure: 

  • There is a chance that a child may disclose a situation that causes suspicion of abuse.  If you suspect a child is being abused follow the reporting guidelines found on the BSA Youth Protection site.  

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