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Webelos Walkabout

Required Adventure

Some places you can only get to if you walk. Walking is great exercise and a fun activity to do with your den or family. In the Webelos Walkabout Adventure, you’ll learn how to prepare for a 2-mile walk, what you should bring along, and what you should do if there is an emergency.  And when you are ready, take your walk!

Requirements

Prepare for a 2-mile walk outside. Gather your Cub Scout Six Essentials and weather appropriate clothing and shoes.
Cub Scout Essential Six Review
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will review Cub Scout Six Essentials and appropriate clothing.

  • Backpack, each Cub Scout to bring their own
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials, Cub Scouts to bring their own
  • Closed Toe Shoes
  • Webelos handbook

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the Cub Scout Six Essentials by watching the Six Essentials video.
  2. Gather supplies.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts to bring their own Cub Scout Six Essentials and a backpack.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts find the Cub Scout Six Essential list in their handbook.
  2. Have Cub Scouts pull out each item and review the following:
    • Name of each item
    • Purpose of each item
    • Alternatives of each item (ex: sun protection can be sunscreen, hat, or sun shirt)
  3. Check Cub Scouts to ensure they’re wearing closed-toe shoes. Review the importance of closed toe shoes for a walk or hike.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts if they need any other weather appropriate clothing for their hike.
Plan a 2-mile route for your walk.
Digital Map
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts plan a route for a two-mile walk.

  • Electronic device with map software downloaded, one for every two or three Cub Scouts
  • Webelos Walkabout Plan found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting: 

  1. Identify an area in which the den can conduct a two-mile walk and download maps accordingly. Ensure that the scale of the map is visible, this is usually found on the lower right-hand corner of a digital map that shows the scale of the map in distance.  For example, 1 inch may equal 1 mile. 
  2. Become familiar with the 5 W of planning a hike. 
    • Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back. For backcountry trips, include a copy of a map with your route marked in pencil. 
    • When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance. 
    • Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving. 
    • Why are you going? To fish in a lake? Climb a peak? Explore a new area? Write a sentence or two about the purpose of your journey. 
    • What are you taking? Always carry the Scout Basic Essentials. If you are camping out, you may need additional food, gear, and shelter. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and inform them that today you are going to work together to plan a 2-mile walk.  To plan this, you are going to follow the 5 W of planning a hike that is used in Scouts BSA. 
  2. Review the 5 W of planning a hike. 
    • Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back.  
    • When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance. 
    • Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving. 
    • Why are you going? To fish in a lake? Climb a peak? Explore a new area? Write a sentence or two about the purpose of your journey. 
    • What are you taking? Always carry the Scout Basic Essentials. If you are camping out, you may need additional food, gear, and shelter. 
  3. STEP ONE – Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back. For backcountry trips, include a copy of a map with your route marked in pencil.  Hand out maps to Cub Scouts. Inform Cub Scouts that maps have a scale for them.  A scale tells you how far distances are in real life compared to how they are seen on the map.  Point out where the map scale is or share with them what scale the maps they hare are. 
    • Have Cub Scouts  help plan a route for their 2-mile walk using the highlighter.  
      • Ask the following: Where will they start and end their walk?    
      • What can they use during their walk to track how far they’ve gone? 
      • How much time should they allot for the 2-mile walk? 
  4. STEP TWO – When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance. 
    • Discuss the date and time of the walk and have Cub Scouts help set the time of when you will start and end.  
  5. STEP THREE – Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving. 
  6. STEP FOUR – Why are you going? Think about the path and if there is anything that may be of interest along the way. Avoid Cub Scouts saying they are doing it because it is a requirement.  
  7. STEP FIVE – What are you taking? Always carry the Cub Scout Six Essentials.  What else may you need to bring? 
  8. Once the den has created the plan for the walk, fill out the plan in the Webelos handbook or the Webelos Walkabout plan. 
  9. Share the details with the Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians.  

Tip: Trail maps that work include AllTrails or Gaia GPS

Webelos Walkabout Plan

Plan A Route
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will plan a route for the 2-mile walk.

  • Printed map of trail or walking path, one per Cub Scout
  • Highlighter
  • Webelos Walkabout Plan found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1.  Identify an area in which the den can conduct a two-mile walk and print maps accordingly. Ensure that the scale of the map is visible, this is usually found on the lower right-hand corner of a digital map that shows the scale of the map in distance.  For example, 1 inch may equal 1 mile.
  2. Become familiar with the 5 W of planning a hike.
    • Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back. For backcountry trips, include a copy of a map with your route marked in pencil.
    • When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance.
    • Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving.
    • Why are you going? To fish in a lake? Climb a peak? Explore a new area? Write a sentence or two about the purpose of your journey.
    • What are you taking? Always carry the Scout Basic Essentials. If you are camping out, you may need additional food, gear, and shelter.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and inform them that today you are going to work together to plan a 2-mile walk.  To plan this, you are going to follow the 5 W of planning a hike that is used in Scouts BSA.
  2. Review the 5 W of planning a hike.
    • Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back.
    • When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance.
    • Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving.
    • Why are you going? To fish in a lake? Climb a peak? Explore a new area? Write a sentence or two about the purpose of your journey.
    • What are you taking? Always carry the Scout Basic Essentials. If you are camping out, you may need additional food, gear, and shelter.
  3. STEP ONE – Where are you going? Decide on a route to your destination and back. For backcountry trips, include a copy of a map with your route marked in pencil.  Hand out maps to Cub Scouts. Inform Cub Scouts that maps have a scale for them.  A scale tells you how far distances are in real life compared to how they are seen on the map.  Point out where the map scale is or share with them what scale the maps they hare are.
    • Have Cub Scouts  help plan a route for their 2-mile walk using the highlighter.
      • Ask the following: Where will they start and end their walk?
      • What can they use during their walk to track how far they’ve gone?
      • How much time should they allot for the 2-mile walk?
  4. STEP TWO – When will you return? If you are not back reasonably close to the time on your trip plan, Scout leaders and family members can take steps to locate you and, if necessary, provide assistance.
    • Discuss the date and time of the walk and have Cub Scouts help set the time of when you will start and end.
  5. STEP THREE – Who is hiking with you? List the names of your partners. If you need a ride to or from a trail, write down who will do the driving.
  6. STEP FOUR – Why are you going? Think about the path and if there is anything that may be of interest along the way. Avoid Cub Scouts saying they are doing it because it is a requirement.
  7. STEP FIVE – What are you taking? Always carry the Cub Scout Six Essentials.  What else may you need to bring?
  8. Once the den has created the plan for the walk, fill out the plan in the Webelos handbook or the Webelos Walkabout plan.
  9. Share the details with the Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians.

Webelos Walkabout Plan

Check the weather forecast for the time of your planned 2-mile walk.
What’s The Forecast?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts check the weather forecast for the 2-mile walk.

  •  Smart device with weather app that includes a forecast

During the meeting:

  1. Using a smart device have Cub Scouts open a weather forecasting app.
  2. Have Cub Scouts look at the forecast for the date of their walk and ask the following questions:
    • What kind of weather will be happening?
    • What will the temperature be?
    • Do we need any special clothing or gear for the walk?
    • Why is it important to know the weather before venturing out onto a 2-mile walk?
Review the four points of BSA SAFE Checklist and how you will apply them on your 2-mile walk.
Safety First
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts review the four points of the BSA SAFE checklist.

Before the meeting:

  1. Print SAFE Checklist, one for each Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Hand out SAFE Checklist to Cub Scouts.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to take turns reading the four points of the checklist.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts the following:
    • What does it mean to have proper supervision?
    • Why do we need to assess for risks?
    • Do you know what is on the Health and Medical Form? Why is it important for leaders to know that information?
    • Why is it important people have equipment that is properly sized for the activity?
    • How can we apply these four points to our two-mile walk?
    • What are some steps we can take to make sure we have a SAFE walk?
Demonstrate first aid for each of the following events that could occur on your 2-mile walk: blister, sprained ankle, sunburn, dehydration and heat related illness.
First Aid Demonstration
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts invite members from a Scouts BSA troop, Venturing crew, or Sea Scouts ship to a den meeting and allow them to demonstrate first aid.

Before the meeting:

  1. Ask a local BSA troop, crew, or ship if they have members who would be willing to visit your den meeting to demonstrate first aid. Give them the date and location of your den meeting.
  2. Explain that you would like the guests to demonstrate first aid for the following. Ask them to bring the supplies they’ll need.
    • Sunburn
    • Sprained ankle
    • Dehydration
    • Foot blisters

During the meeting:

  1. Welcome visiting members.
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts what they will be doing during the meeting.
  3. Ask the visiting members to demonstrate first aid.
  4. When they’re finished, have Cub Scouts ask questions such as:
    • How did you learn your first aid skills?
    • Have you ever had to administer first aid?
    • Was it scary?
    • What other types of first aid have you administered?

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the visiting members and send it.
First Responder Visit
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts visit a first responder to learn about first aid.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local firehouse or EMS and schedule a visit.
  2. Contact parents or legal guardians to give them the details of the visit. Remind them to bring a completed Activity Consent Form for their Cub Scout.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting space.
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions. Remind them to be respectful during the presentation.
  3. Ask the first responders to explain first aid for the following:
    • Sunburn
    • Sprained ankle
    • Dehydration
    • Foot blisters

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the organization and send it.
Trail First Aid
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts learn first aid for blisters, sprained ankles, sunburns, and dehydration.

  • Moleskin
  • Band-Aid
  • Ace bandage
  • Aloe vera
  • Sunscreen
  • Water
  • Gatorade
  • Small bag to hold first aid materials

Before the meeting:

  1. On small pieces of paper, write down one of the “injuries” (blister, sprained ankle, sunburn, and dehydration and heat related illness) on each.  Ensure that each Cub Scout will have an injury.
  2. Set up meeting space so that Cub Scouts have plenty of room to move around.

During the meeting:

  1. Place folded pieces of paper with “injuries” in  a hat. Have each Cub Scout pick a piece of paper and silently read it to themselves.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts count off.  This is the order of the injured Cub Scout.
  3. Tell Cub Scouts that they’re going on a pretend walk around your meeting space. While on their “walk” each of them will have their “injury” and the others will provide first aid using the items in the first aid bag.
  4. For example:
    • Cub Scout with the sprained ankle injury will “trip” and call out, “Ouch! I hurt my ankle; I think I sprained it.” The den will take out the Ace bandage and pretend to wrap it up.
    • The person who has the dehydration injury can say, “I’m so thirsty and tired, and I’m a little dizzy.” The den will pretend to give them small sips of water or Gatorade.
  5. After they are finished, the walk can resume, and the next person will yell out their injury and so on until all injuries have been given first aid.
With your den, pack, or family, go on your 2-mile walk while practicing the Leave No Trace Principles for Kids and Outdoor Code.
The Two-Mile Walk
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts go on a two-mile walk.

  • Cub Scout Six Essentials
  • Closed Toe Shoes
  • Activity Consent Form
  • Map of walk
  • Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids reference sheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1. Remind Cub Scouts to bring their Six Essentials and wear closed toe shoes.
  2. Remind parents or legal guardians to bring the completed Activity Consent Form.
  3. Print map of walk.
  4. Print Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids reference sheet, one for each Cub Scout.
  5. A week prior and the day before remind Cub Scouts, parents, and legal guardians of the date, time, and location of the walk, especially if it is different than your normal den meeting schedule.

During the meeting:

  1. Before your den begins their two-mile walk, pass out the Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids reference sheet.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to silently read the Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids.
  3. When Cub Scouts are finished, ask them what they can do on the two mile walk to make sure they are abiding by both the Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids.
  4. Go on the two-mile walk.

Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Principles for Kids reference sheet

After your 2-mile walk, discuss with your den what went well and what you would do differently next time.
Stop-Start-Continue
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts assess their two-mile walk.

During the meeting:

  1. After your den has gone on their two-mile walk, tell them they’re going to discuss how their walk went. Explain that you’ll do this by using the Stop-Start-Continue method.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts questions such as:
    • What would you stop doing during the walk? Think about things that made it harder or didn’t go well.
    • What would you start doing during the walk? Think about things that could have gone better.
    • What would you continue doing during the walk? Think about things that you did right and want to keep doing.

Tip: This activity works best when combined with the activity for Requirement 6.

Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:

If there is someone in the den, youth, or adults, who carries an EpiPen due to severe allergies make sure that at least one other adult knows how to administer the EpiPen. To learn more, review this Safety Moment on anaphylaxis.

During the Adventure:

  • Use the buddy system.
  • All adults are to provide active supervision.

Before starting this Adventure, review Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activities.

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