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A Wolf Goes Fishing

Elective Adventure

People have been fishing since long before they started farming.  Today most people fish as a hobby or just for fun, and not for survival.  In this Adventure you will get ready to learn the basics of fishing where you live and join your family, den, or pack on a fishing trip.  

Do wolves fish in the wild? Yes, they do. In Alaska wolves fish for salmon, and in Minnesota they fish for freshwater fish in creeks.  Let’s learn about the different types of water in which fish and how to catch them. 

Requirements

Identify the type of water you will be fishing in and what type of fish live in the water.
Fish Name Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Play a game and learn about the diverse local fish species within your state.

  • Printed pictures of native/local fish; these can be found by going to your state’s fish and wildlife department website
  • Scissors
  • Paper for drawing
  • Pens, pencils, crayons
  • Small flat magnets (one for each fish)
  • Paper clips
  • ½” diameter 2’ length dowel rods (one for every 2 or 3 Cub Scouts)
  • String or yarn for fishing line
  • Tarp to serve as the “pond” or string or tape to mark off an area for the “pond”

Before the meeting:

  1. Cut out the fish and write facts about them on the backs of the pictures.
  2. Glue a magnet to each picture.
  3. Make “fishing rods” by tying or taping a length of string to each dowel rod. Tie a paper clip to the other end of the string.
  4. Place the fish in an area that you designate as the pond. Put paper, pencils, pens, and crayons on a table close to the pond.

During the meeting :

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’re going to learn about the fish that live in their area.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts that after they catch a fish, they are to take it to the table and draw it on a piece of paper adding the name of the fish and one or two facts about it.
  3. Give each Cub Scout a fishing rod and have them line up by the pond.
  4. Instruct Cub Scouts to catch a fish using their magnetic fishing rod. After they finish their drawing of the fish, tell them to release the fish back into the pond.
  5. You can set a time limit for the game or let Cub Scouts play until they’ve caught and learned about all the fish pictures.

Tip: You can laminate the fish for durability.

Tip: With slight modifications, you can use the same fishing poles for the Fish Names Game, Cast & Learn, Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge, Crazy Casting Spin-Off, and Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge.

Fishery Visit
LocationTravel
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Visit a fishery or a fish hatchery. 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Contact a local fishery or fish hatchery that offers educational visits and schedule a meeting. 
  2. Ask whether the visit will be a guided tour led by fishery staff or a self-guided tour where your group will explore independently. 
  3. If it’s a self-guided tour, request informational materials and guidelines from the fishery or hatchery staff. This will help you prepare for the tour. 
  4. Inform Cub Scouts’ parent or legal guardian about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting space. 
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions. 
  3. If it is a guided tour, thank the person who guided the tour.  

After the meeting: 

  1. Write a thank you note to the fishery or fish hatchery and send. 
Who’s That Fish?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

A game of Who’s that Fish? Where Cub Scouts guess what fish is pictured and if it is native.

  • Printed pictures of native/local fish; these can be on your state’s fish and wildlife department website; a minimum of 1 per Cub Scout 
  • Printed pictures of fish that are not native to your area; a minimum of 1 per Cub Scout 
  • Printer  
  • Masking tape 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print pictures of fish that are native to your area.  
  2. Print pictures of fish that are not native to your area. You can use the pictures found in Wolf A Wolf Goes Fishing 1 Who’s That Fish.pdf or you can find your own. 
  3. On the back of each fish, write down two facts. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Stand at the front of the room with a second adult. 
  2. Have the second adult turn their back to Cub Scouts and tape one of the fish pictures to their chest. 
  3. Ask the adult to turn around showing the fish picture to Cub Scouts. Read a couple of the facts about that fish to Cub Scouts. 
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to raise their hands if they think the fish is native to their area. Then ask them to raise their hands if they think it is not native to their area. 
  5. Start again with the leader taping a different fish picture to their chest.  
  6. Continue until you’ve talked about all of the fish. 

Wolf A Wolf Goes Fishing 1 Who’s That Fish.pdf

Learn about the different types of bait used to attract fish.
Bait-Ology Bonanza
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time2

Learn about fishing baits with a memory game. 

  • Artificial lures such as plastic worms, spinnerbaits, roundhead jigs, dropshots 
  • Live bait such as worms, crickets, and minnows 
  • Household items that can be used as bait: corn, hot dogs, sandwich meat, bread 
  • Something to cover the bait such as newspaper, a piece of fabric, a plastic tablecloth, etc. 

Before the meeting:  

  1. Collect different types of fishing bait, including both live and artificial. Gather more examples than the number of Cub Scouts in your den. 
  2. Immediately before the meeting begins, arrange the bait on a table so Cub Scouts can examine it. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Tell Cub Scouts that there are several factors that go into choosing the type of bait you’ll use. These include the type of fish you want to catch and your fishing location. 
  2. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’re going to learn about different types of fishing bait 
  3. Show Cub Scouts each type of bait and the name of the bait. 
  4. After you’ve given Cub Scouts all the names, tell them that you’re going to allow them to gather around the table for two or three minutes. At the end of that time, you’ll cover up the bait so that they can’t see it. 
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to name one of the types of bait that they saw by calling on them one at a time. 
  6. After each Cub Scout has had an opportunity to name an example, uncover the bait and count how many they got right. 
Demonstrate a proper cast for the pole or rod you are using
Cast & Learn
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Learn how to cast fishing pole with accuracy by trying to hit a target. 

Cub Scouts can bring their own fishing poles or secure enough youth fishing poles for Cub Scouts to use.   

  • Spincaster fishing poles 
  • ½” flat washers – one for each fishing pole 
  • Frisbees 
  • Cast & Learn scoresheet found in Additional Resources 
  • Printer  

Before the meeting: 

  1. Spread out frisbees in the casting area to serve as targets. Decide how many points Cub Scouts can earn for landing in each frisbee. The further the frisbee the more points they are worth.    
  2. Print Cast & Learn scoresheet, one for the den. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that they’ll be practicing casting their fishing pole and that the goal is to hit the center of the target. 
  2. Remove any hooks from the fishing poles and replace them with flat washers 
  3. Demonstrate how to cast the pole toward the target. Cast the pole five times and add up your points for the five casts. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts line up and practice.  When they are ready allow them to go to cast for a score. 
  5. Take turns casting five times. After their five turns, tell them to add up their points and record their score on the den scoresheet. 

Tip: With slight modifications, you can use the same fishing poles for the Fish Names Game, Cast & Learn, Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge, Crazy Casting Spin-Off, and Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge. 

Cast & Learn scoresheet

Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List4
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts practice casting their pole or rod to catch a paper fish. 

Cub Scouts can bring their own fishing poles or secure enough youth fishing poles for Cub Scouts to use.   

The items in this activity can be kept for future dens or pack activities. 

There are similar practice casting kits that are available for sale instead of making your own.  

  • Spincaster fishing poles 
  • ½” flat washers – one for each fishing pole 
  • Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge pattern found in Additional Resources 
  • Cardstock 
  • Printer  
  • Small magnets 
  • ½” flat washers that magnets will attach to.  (Iron, steel, or nickel) 
  • Glue 
  • Blue painter’s tape 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Designate an area as a pond using blue painter’s tape on the floor.  Make the area at least 25 feet long to allow for long casting. 
  2. Block off the area to prevent anyone from walking near or around where Cub Scouts will be casting.  
  3. Make several fish using the Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge pattern and card stock. You’ll need at least one for every two Cub Scouts in your den. 
    • Print out the fish pattern on card stock. 
    • Cut out the fish and match them up so that the blue color shows on each side. 
    • Using tape, tape a magnet to the back (white) side of one of the fish.  
    • Put the other fish on top of the fish with the magnet, and tape (with the regular tape) or glue them together. 
  4. Test to make sure that the flat washers will attach to the magnets and hold the fish. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Designate an area in your meeting room as your “pond,” and spread the fish out in the pond. 
  2. Remove any hooks from the fishing poles and tie on flat washers. 
  3. Mark lines that are 6 feet apart on the casting end of the “pond” for Cub Scouts to cast from. 
  4. Demonstrate the proper way to cast. 
  5. Allow Cub Scouts to practice.  
  6. Divide Cub Scouts into two teams and have each team line up 6 feet behind one of the casting areas. 
  7. Explain the rules of the game. 
    • The first Cub Scout in line will step up to the casting area and cast until they catch a fish. 
    • Once they catch a fish they go to the back of their team’s line. 
    • The team that has each team member catch a fish wins. 

 Tip: With slight modifications, you can use the same fishing poles for the Fish Names Game, Cast & Learn, Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge, Crazy Casting Spin-Off, and Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge.

Crazy Casting Spin-Off
LocationOutdoor
Energy 5
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts practice their casting skills by distance and accuracy. 

Cub Scouts can bring their own fishing poles or secure enough youth fishing poles for Cub Scouts to use.   

The items in this activity can be kept for future dens or pack activities. 

There are similar practice casting kits that are available for sale instead of making your own.  

  • Spincaster fishing poles 
  • ½” flat washers – one for each fishing pole 
  • Blue painter’s tape 
  • Crazy Casting Spin-Off spinner pattern found in Additional Resources 
  • Cardstock  
  • Printer  
  • Brad fastener 
  • 3 hula hoops 
  • Tape measure 
  • Neckerchief or blindfold 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print the spinner on card stock, cut it out, and assemble it with the brad fastener. 
  2. Mark off a safe area that is at least 40 feet long to allow for long casting. 
  3. Mark off three spots that are 6-feet apart that will serve as casting areas for Cub Scouts. 
  4. Place the hoops 20-feet from each of the three casting areas. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Have Cub Scouts gather in an open area outside free of obstacles. 
  2. Demonstrate the proper way to cast, make sure to cover the methods that are on the Crazy Casting Spin-Off spinner. 
  3. Give Cub Scouts time to practice casting. 
  4. Have Cub Scouts line up 6 feet behind one of the casting areas. 
  5. Have the first Cub Scout in line, spin the spinner, and attempt the cast the spinner lands on.  A successful cast is one that lands in a hula hoop.  
  6. Continue until every Cub Scout has at least one chance at the challenge.  

Tip: Some of the casts are silly like “do three bunny hops then cast.” This is to make the activity more exciting.  

Tip: If you have a large den, you may want to divide Cub Scouts into two or three groups and make two or three spinners and two or three fishing poles. 

Tip: With slight modifications, you can use the same fishing poles for the Fish Names Game, Cast & Learn, Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge, Crazy Casting Spin-Off, and Cast-A-Thon Relay Challenge. 

Crazy Casting Spin-Off spinner pattern

Learn the rules of fishing safely.
Bait And Switch Safety Rules Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts learn the fishing safety rules in this flashcard game. 

  • Bait & Switch Safety Rules Game found in Additional Resources 
  • Cardstock 
  • Printer  
  • Scissors 
  • Wolf handbook

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print Bait & Switch Safety Rules Game on cardstock. 
  2. Cut out each flashcard.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Place the flashcards face down in a pile. 
  2. Have Cub Scouts read the fishing safety rules in their Wolf handbook. 
  3. Have Cub Scouts pick a buddy. 
  4. Explain the game to Cub Scouts. Each pair of Cub Scouts will turn a card over, read it, and shout out “rule” or “not rule.” 
  5. Continue the game with the next pair of Cub Scouts until you’ve gone through all the cards.  

Tip: Instead of Cub Scouts saying “rule” or “not rule,” they could say “bait” when it is a rule and “switch” when it isn’t. 

Tip: Laminating the flashcards will make them more durable. 

Bait & Switch Safety Rules Game

Hook, Line, And Safety Poster
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts make a poster about fishing safety. 

  • Poster board, 1 for every two Cub Scouts 
  • Pencils, crayons, and markers 
  • Glue or tape 
  • Scissors 
  • Stickers for decoration  
  • Wolf handbook 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide Cub Scouts into teams of two to three. 
  2. Explain that Cub Scouts will be working together to make a poster to show the rules they should follow to safely fish. 
  3. Using the fishing rules found in the Wolf handbooks, have Cub Scouts write the rules somewhere on their poster. Fishing rules: 
    • Fish with proper adult supervision. 
    • Get permission to fish where you plan to fish. 
    • Check the weather before you go. Do not fish in a thunderstorm or inclement weather. 
    • Use the buddy system. You must be able to see them. 
    • Give plenty of room to others who are fishing nearby. 
    • Never fish where people are swimming. 
  4. Encourage Cub Scouts to draw pictures representing the fishing safety rules. 
  5. Encourage Cub Scouts to decorate their poster using crayons, markers, or stickers. 
Tacklebox Trivia
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

A fun and interactive way to learn the rules of fishing safely through a jeopardy-type game. 

  • Poster board or a large sheet of cardboard 
  • Post-it notes (multiple colors if possible) 
  • Markers  
  • Ruler 
  • Tape or glue 
  • Tacklebox Trivia cards found in Additional Resources  
  • Cardstock 
  • Printer  
  • Access to Tacklebox Trivia Clues and Answers found in Additional Resources 

Before the meeting: 

  1. Lay out your poster board horizontally or vertically, depending on your preference. Use a ruler to create a large table with six rows and four columns for your categories and point values. 
  2. Write the names of the categories in the top row:  Fishing Safety, Fishing Equipment, Types of Bait, and Cub Scout Six Essentials. 
  3. Print the clues from Tacklebox Trivia and cut them out. 
  4. Tape or glue each clue into one of the boxes in the correct category. 
  5. Write the point values (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500) onto individual Post-it notes. You’ll need four sets, one for each category. 
  6. Place the Post-it notes over the clues. 

During the meeting: 

  1. Divide Cub Scouts into two or three groups.  
  2. Before beginning the game, ask an adult to determine which team raises their hand first and to keep score. 
  3. Explain the game rules to Cub Scouts. After a clue is read, the first team to raise one of their hands is called on to try to answer the clue. If they answer correctly, they are awarded the value of the points. Their answer must be in the form of a question (who is, what is, etc.). 
  4. Ask one of the teams to select a category and point value. 
  5. Remove the Post-it note from the selected clue, and read it to the teams. 
  6. Call on the first team that raises their hand. 
  7. If the team gives the correct answer in the correct format, they are awarded the points. If they answer incorrectly, the points are deducted from their score, and another team is allowed to answer. 
  8. The team that gives the correct answer selects the next category and point value. 
  9. Continue playing until all the categories and points have been answered. 

Tacklebox Trivia cards

Tacklebox Trivia Clues and Answers

With your den, pack, or family, go fishing.
Go Fish
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts go on a fishing expedition with their den. 

  • Fishing poles, one per Cub Scout
  • Fishing line
  • Barbless Hooks
  • Fishing net
  • Bait or tackle based on the fish you will be fishing for
  • Tacklebox
  • Fishing pliers or multitool
  • Den First Aid Kit
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials
  • Activity Consent Form

Before the meeting:

  1. Research local fishing spots that are family-friendly and have easy access. Get permission, if needed, to fish there.
  2. Ensure you are aware of any fishing regulations and licensing requirements in your area. Purchase a fishing license if necessary.  Youth may not need a fishing license but adults who are fishing are likely to need one.
  3. Inform parents and guardians of the date/time/location of the fishing activity.
  4. Secure additional adult supervision.
  5. Remind parents and guardians to complete Activity Consent Form
  6. A week prior to the activity visit the site to become familiar with facilities such as access to drinking water, bathrooms, and parking.   Inform parents and guardians of any details about the facilities that are important such as where to park and where the den will meet up.
  7. Confirm with parents and guardians that every Cub Scout has a fishing pole and develop a plan to provide fishing poles for those who do not have one.

During the meeting:

  1. Meet at the designated area of the fishing spot.
  2. Collect Activity Consent Forms.
  3. Review the fishing safety rules and any local rules or regulations with Cub Scouts.
  4. Discuss what type of fish you will be fishing for and what type of bait or lure to use.
  5. Have adults help Cub Scouts with attaching bait or lures.
  6. Ensure that Cub Scouts are spaced a safe distance apart from each other and away from obstacles.
  7. As Cub Scouts are fishing have adults give positive coaching and encouragement.
  8. If a fish is caught practice catch and release.
  9. Assist Cub Scouts who catch a fish to release it.
  10. Before leaving the fishing area, have Cub Scouts and adults pick up any trash that may be found.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are  related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting the Adventure:

  • Review content about fishing on Scouting.org.
  • Check state requirements for fishing licenses or permits for youth and adults.
  • Secure additional adult supervision that can assist Cub Scouts during the activity.
  • Get permission to fish where you plan to fish.
  • Check the weather before you go. Do not fish in a thunderstorm or inclement weather.
  • If fishing in freshwater, review Fishing Basics PowerPoint presentation and Instructor’s Guideto teach freshwater fishing.
  • Additional fishing resources can be found at Scout Life Magazine.

During the Adventure:

  • Use the buddy system.
  • Give plenty of room to others who are fishing nearby.
  • Never fish where people are swimming.

Once you know your local fishing rules and regulations, here are the 6 things to know to keep you and others safe:

  1. Fish with proper adult supervision.
  2. Get permission to fish where you plan to fish.
  3. Check the weather before you go.  Do not fish in a thunderstorm or inclement weather.
  4. Use the buddy system.  You must be able to see them.
  5. Give plenty of room to others who are fishing nearby.
  6. Never fish where people are swimming.

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