Cub-a-Palooza Registration is now open. Click for details.

Air Of The Wolf

Elective Adventure

It’s time to take flight. Do you know the secret to making a paper airplane fly longer or farther? In this Adventure, you will have fun making different types of airplanes and other flying objects.

Requirements

Make a paper airplane and fly it five times. Record the flight distance and time.
Make A Paper Airplane
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts make and fly a paper airplane.

  • 8 ½” x 11” inch paper (several pages for each Cub Scout)
  • ​​F​olding instructions sheets for each Cub Scout, see Make a Paper Airplane found in Additional Resources
  • Flight distance and time sheet for each Cub Scout, see Make a Paper Airplane tracker in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencils or pens
  • Measuring tape
  • Stopwatch or phone with stopwatch app

Before the Meeting:

  1. Print copies of folding instructions, and flight distance and time sheet.
  2. Ask two adults to assist. One to be the timekeeper and one to measure distance.

During the Meeting:

  1. Pass out handouts and paper to make the airplanes to each Cub Scout.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts that they’re going to make and fly paper airplanes. Let Cub Scouts know that they can use any design they want, but they have the folding instructions sheet as a reference.
  3. While Cub Scouts are making their planes, mark a start line. Cub Scouts will stand behind this line when they fly their planes.
  4. After all Cub Scouts have finished folding their airplanes, explain that they’re going to fly them five times and record how far they travel and how long they stay in the air.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to line up behind the start line. One at a time, have Cub Scouts fly their paper airplane.
  6. Have the time and distance keepers announce the results and remind Cub Scouts to record their numbers on their sheet.
  7. Have the next Cub Scout in line fly their paper airplane. Repeat step 6.
  8. Continue steps 5, 6, and 7 until all Cub Scouts have flown their airplanes five times.
  9. Ask Cub Scouts what features the paper airplanes that flew the furthest have in common.

Tip: This activity can be done with the paper airplane comparison activity for requirement 2.

Make a Paper Airplane folding instructions

Make a Paper Airplane flight distance and time tracker

Make a paper airplane of a different design and fly it five times. Record the flight distance and time.
Paper Airplane Comparison
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts will make a different paper airplane design and fly it five times.

  • 8 ½” x 11” inch paper, several pages for each Cub Scout
  • ​​Folding instructions sheets for each Cub Scout, Paper Airplane Comparison​ in Additional Resources
  • Flight distance and time sheet for each Cub Scout, Paper Airplane Comparison tracker in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pencils or pens
  • Measuring tape
  • Stopwatch or phone with stopwatch app

Before the meeting:

  1. Print one copy of the folding instructions sheet and one copy of the flight distance and time sheet for each Cub Scout.
  2. Ask two adults to assist. One to be the timekeeper and one to measure distance.

During the meeting:

  1. Pass out handouts and paper to make the airplanes to each Cub Scout.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts that they’re going to make and fly a different paper airplane design. Let Cub Scouts know that they can use any design they want, but they have the folding instructions sheet as a reference.
  3. While Cub Scouts are making their planes, mark a start line. Cub Scouts will stand behind this line when they fly their planes.
  4. After all of Cub Scouts have finished folding their airplanes, explain that they’re going to fly them five times and record how far they travel and how long they stay in the air.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to line up behind the start line. One at a time, have Cub Scouts fly their paper airplane.
  6. Have the time and distance keepers announce the results and remind Cub Scout to record their numbers on their sheet.
  7. Have the next Cub Scout in line fly their paper airplane. Repeat step 6.
  8. Continue steps 5, 6, and 7 until all Cub Scouts have flown their airplanes five times.
  9. Ask Cub Scouts what features the paper airplanes that flew the furthest have in common.

Tip: This activity can be done with the make a paper airplane activity for requirement 1.

Paper Airplane Comparison folding instructions sheets

Paper Airplane Comparison tracker

Compare and contrast the two paper airplanes by distance and flight times.
Paper Airplane Derby
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts participate in a paper airplane derby.

  • 8 ½” x 11” paper, at least 6 or 7 pieces per Cub Scout
  • Pens or pencils
  • Measuring tape
  • Stopwatch or phone with stopwatch app
  • Paper Airplane Derby scoresheet found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Paper Airplane Derby scoresheet, 4 scoresheets per page, enough for 1 scoresheet for each Cub Scout.
  2. Just before the meeting, set up each of the four rounds. Ask adults to help and assign one or two of them to each round.
  3. Depending on how many Cub Scouts you have, you might want to have them rotate through the rounds instead of everyone competing at one station before moving to the next one
  4. For the Bullseye Bonanza Target Round: Find a suitable target, such as a pole, tree, or marked spot on the ground. Find a throwing spot, ensuring it’s about 10 steps away from the target.
  5. For the Hang-Time Heroes Hang Time Round: Find an open area without obstructions where Cub Scouts can fly their planes. Mark the throwing spot.
  6. For the Pathfinder Precision Accuracy Round: Find a suitable straight path along which Cub Scouts can fly their planes such as a sidewalk, hallway, or marked area. Mark the throwing spot.
  7. For the Sky’s the Limit Distance Round: Find an open area without obstructions where Cub Scouts can fly their planes. Mark the throwing spot.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that there are four rounds of the Paper Airplane Derby.
    • Bullseye Bonanza – Land the airplane as close as possible to the target.
    • Hang-Time Heroes – Keep the airplane in the air as long as possible.
    • Pathfinder Precision – Fly the airplane in a straight path, landing it as close as possible to the middle.
    • Sky’s the Limit – Fly the airplane as far as possible.
  2. Instruct Cub Scouts to make at least four airplanes, one for each round. They may also want to make some extra planes to practice with. Have them write their names on each of their planes. They may also decorate their planes by drawing pictures or designs on them.
  3. Give Cub Scouts time to practice flying their planes. When the practice time is up, have them choose which planes they’ll fly for each round.
  4. For the Bullseye Bonanza Target Round:
    • Have Cub Scouts line up behind the throwing spot. Ask one or two parents to stand near the target with a measuring tape.
    • Each Cub Scout will take a turn throwing their airplane at the target, aiming to land it as close to the target as possible. The parents will measure how far away from the target the plane is. Each Cub Scout will record how far away they are from the target.
  5. For the Hang-Time Heroes Hang Time Round:
    • Have Cub Scouts line up behind the throwing spot. Ask one parent to watch the plane and another parent to work the stopwatch.
    • Each Cub Scout will take a turn throwing their airplane, aiming to keep it in the air as long as possible. When the plane lands, the parent watching it will tell the other parent to stop the stopwatch. Each Cub Scout will record how long their plane stayed in the air.
  6. For the Pathfinder Precision Accuracy Round:
    • Have Cub Scouts line up behind the throwing spot. Ask one or two parents to stand by the path with measuring tape.
    • Each Cub Scout will take a turn throwing their airplane, aiming to land it as close to the middle of the path as possible. When the plane lands, the parents will measure how close to the middle of the path it is. Each Cub Scout will record how far away they are from the middle of the path.
    • Tip: You might want to set an acceptable minimum distance for throws to count.
  7. For the Sky’s the Limit Distance Round:
    • Have Cub Scouts line up behind the throwing spot. Ask one or two parents to stand near the throwing spot with a long measuring tape.
    • Each Cub Scout will take a turn throwing their airplane, aiming to fly as far as possible. When the plane lands, the parents will measure how far the plane flew from the throwing spot. Each Cub Scout will record how far their plane flew.
  8. Have Cub Scouts compare their results. You can award small prizes to the winners of each round if you would like.
  9. Ask Cub Scouts what features the paper airplanes that did the best in each challenge have in common.

Tip: If you have a large den, you may not have time to do all four rounds. If you don’t, pick two to do.

Paper Airplane Derby scoresheet

Paper Airplane Golf
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will play paper airplane golf.

  • 8 ½” x 11” paper, at least 2 or 3 pieces per Cub Scout
  • Markers and colored pencils to decorate the airplanes
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Items to create “hole” such hula hoops, laundry baskets, or buckets
  • Paper Airplane Golf scorecard found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1. Print a Paper Airplane Golf scorecard for each Cub Scout.
  2. Find an open outdoor area with enough room for each hole.
  3. For each hole, place a hula hoop, laundry basket, bucket, etc. on the ground and mark a starting point a few steps away.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts make paper airplanes.
  2. Starting at hole 1, each Cub Scout flies their plane, trying to land it inside the “hole” with the fewest throws.
  3. After their turn, each Cub Scout records their score on the scorecard.
  4. When all Cub Scouts have had a turn at hole 1, they move to hole 2 and so on, until Cub Scouts complete all the holes.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts what features the paper airplanes that did the best have in common.

Paper Airplane Golf scorecard

Paper Airplane Obstacle Course
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts participate in a paper airplane obstacle course.

  • 8 ½” x 11” paper, 2 or 3 pieces per Cub Scout
  • Markers and colored pencils to decorate the airplanes
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Supplies for obstacles, items such as pool noodles, cardboard boxes, paper, wire hangers, etc.
  • Print one Den Obstacle Course Time Sheet, see Paper Airplane Obstacle Course in Additional Resources

Before the meeting:

  1. Design your obstacle course by brainstorming the obstacles you want to include in your course. Some ideas include hoops, tunnels, targets, and rings.
  2. Determine the layout of your course, keeping in mind the available space and the order of the obstacles.
  3. Create the obstacles. For each obstacle, you’ll need to create a target or a structure. Here are a few ideas:
    • Hoops: Create large hoops using wire hangers or pool noodles. Shape them into circles and secure the ends with tape or string.
    • Tunnels: Use large cardboard boxes or sheets to create tunnels.
    • Targets: Draw or print out targets on sheets of paper. These can be circles, squares, or any shape you like.
    • Rings: Create rings using pool noodles or flexible plastic tubing. Shape them into circles and secure the ends.
  4. Immediately before the meeting, set up your obstacles.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts how the obstacle course will work.
  2. Have Cub Scouts make their paper airplanes and write their names on them. They may decorate them with markers or colored pencils.
  3. Each Cub Scout takes turns flying their paper airplane through the obstacle course, attempting to complete it as quickly and accurately as possible.
  4. Time each Cub Scout’s run and have them record it on the den time sheet.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts what features the paper airplanes that did the best have in common.

Paper Airplane Obstacle Course time sheet

Build a flying object that is not a paper airplane.
Balsawood Airplanes
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List5
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts build and fly balsawood airplanes.

  • Balsawood airplane kits, one per Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Put together one of the balsa wood airplanes using the instructions found in the package so that you can demonstrate this to Cub Scouts.
  2. Identify a place to fly planes that is free of obstacles.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts put together their balsa wood airplanes according to the instructions found in the package.
  2. Have Cub Scouts fly their balsa wood airplanes.
Paper Kites
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts make and fly a paper kite.

  • 8 ½” x 11″ piece of paper for each Cub Scout, colored paper makes the best kites
  • Bamboo skewer for each Cub Scout
  • Tape
  • Cotton string
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Party streamers (optional)

Before the meeting:

  1. Break off the pointed end of each skewer.
  2. Prepare meeting space to allow for making kites.
  3. Identify an area free of obstacles to fly kites.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to fold their piece of paper “hamburger” style so that the paper is 8 ½” by 5 ½”.
  2. Have Cub Scouts fold one side of the paper on an angle. Then have them turn the paper over and fold the other side at an angle.
  3. Have Cub Scouts unfold one side. Leave the folded side facing up.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to tape down the folded edge.
  5. Have Cub Scouts tape the skewer to the wider end of the paper, across the fold.
  6. Ask Cub Scouts to pick up the paper and hold the kite by the folded part under the skewer.
  7. Ask Cub Scouts to punch a hole through the double pages right below the skewer.
  8. Have Cub Scouts run a length of string through the hole and tie it to the kit.
  9. If they want, Cub Scouts can tape streamers to the narrow end of their kites.
  10. Take Cub Scouts outside to fly their kites.

Tip: This YouTube video, How to Make a Simple Kite, from Inner Child Run Media, LLC, shows exactly how to make a simple kite.

Wolf-Copters
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts make and fly Wolf-Copters.

  • Wolf-Copter template found in Additional Resources
  • Printer
  • Pens and pencils
  • Scissors
  • Paper clip for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Print a Wolf-Copter template for each Cub Scout.
  2. Set up meeting area for Cub Scouts to make Wolf-Copters.
  3. Identify a space free of obstacles to fly Wolf-Copters.

During the meeting:

  1. Pass out the Wolf-Copter templates and paper clips to Cub Scouts.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts to start at the top of a Wolf-Copter strip and count down two boxes.
  3. Next, have Cub Scouts cut (or tear) along the dotted line to the solid line at the bottom of the second box to make ‘ears.’
  4. Then have Cub Scouts fold one flap forward on the solid line, and the other flap backward.
  5. Ask Cub Scouts to fold up the bottom of their copter on the solid line. Attach a paper clip to the folded bottom.
  6. Instruct Cub Scouts to hold up the copter as high as they can and let it drop.
  7. Encourage Cub Scouts to think of ways to change it so it twirls faster and has them repeat the flight with their new designs.

Tip: To make the fastest twirling Wolf-Copter, have Cub Scouts cut down to the solid line at the bottom of the fourth box.

Wolf-Copter template

Print

Safety Moment

Before any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

Join our email list

Get the latest news and information from the Pack.

This website is independently operated and is not sponsored by, endorsed by, or affiliated with the Boy Scouts of America. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author alone and in no way represent the views of the Boy Scouts of America. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA®, the BSA Universal Emblem, the Venturing diamond logo, and all other related marks are trademarks owned exclusively by the Boy Scouts of America.  Website designed and maintained by Jake Parrott