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Champions For Nature Lion – Lion

Elective Adventure

As part of the World Organization of the Scouting Movement, this program is part of a global effort to teach youth about the conservation of natural resources.  This includes participating in a service project.

Requirements

Discover the difference between natural resources and man-made items.
Match Natural and Man-made
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Identify pictures of things that are natural and things that are man-made.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 28
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 28 of the Lion handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and discuss the difference between something that is man-made vs natural.
  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to complete the activity on page 28 of the Lion handbook.
  3. When everyone is done, Cub Scouts share their answers.
Natural to Man-made
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Identity items that are man-made but made from natural items.

  • Pencil
  • Cotton t-shirt
  • Wool socks
  • Water glass

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.
  2. Learn how pencils are made by watching this YouTube video “How Pencils Are Made.”
  3. Learn how cotton is made by watching this YouTube video “How Cotton is Processed in Factories.”
  4. Learn how wool is made by watching this YouTube video, “How It’s Made Wool.”
  5. Learn how glass is made by watching this YouTube video, “How is Glass Made?

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and discuss the difference between something that is man-made vs natural.
  2. Explain that several things are made from natural materials that people have learned to use to make useful things.
  3. Share with the den what you learned about how each item was made, pencil, cotton, wool, and glass.
Sorting Natural Items
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Play a sorting game of items that are natural and items that are man-made.

  • Natural items, a set for each Cub Scout
    • A stick
    • A rock
    • A feather
    • A flower
    • A leaf
  • Man-made items, a set for each Cub Scout
    • A spoon
    • A water bottle
    • A flashlight
    • A trash bag
    • A towel
  • A pillowcase, one for each Cub Scout
  • 1 medium-sized box labeled “man-made” for each Cub Scout
  • 1 medium-sized box labeled “natural” for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather the materials and mix the set of natural and man-made items together in a pillowcase for each Cub Scout.
  2. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to conduct the activity.
  3. Set the pillowcases filled with items in a row about 3 feet apart from each other.  Place the boxes about 15 feet away from the pillowcases.
  4. Cub Scouts will take an item from the pillowcase and run to the appropriate box and place the item into the correct box based on the item being man-made or natural.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and discuss the difference between something that is man-made vs natural.
  2. Explain the rules of the game.
    • Cub Scouts will stand with their adult partners next to a pillowcase filled with natural and man-made items.
    • On the signal the adult partner will pull an item out of the pillowcase and hand it to the Cub Scout.
    • The Cub Scout takes the item and runs to the boxes, places it in the appropriate box then runs back.
    • The adult partner pulls the next item out and the Cub Scout repeats the process until all items in the pillowcase have been sorted.
    • If an item is placed in the wrong box the Cub Scout must take it out of the box, run back to the adult partner, and run back to place it in the correct box before getting the next item.
    • The Cub Scout that correctly sorts all items first wins.
Discover the difference between organic, paper, plastic, metal and glass waste.
Types of Trash
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Identify the difference between items that are organic, paper, and glass.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 29
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting space so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that when we are done using something it becomes trash but may not be the end of that thing being useful.  Some items can be used again either in the same way or in different ways.  There are things like food that we don’t eat or that goes bad that is called organic and it naturally breaks down into food for plants.  Some items like broken glass can be gathered, heated, and made into new glass items.  Paper items are made from trees and so they can either break down in the ground or they can be gathered and mixed with water and other materials to make new paper.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to complete the activity on page 29 of the Lion handbook.
  3. When everyone is done have Cub Scouts take turns giving their answer for each item.
Discover recycling.
Use It Again
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Take a trip to a recycling center.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact your local recycling facility to arrange a tour of a facility where items are processed to be recycled.
  2. Inform the contact at the recycling facility that the Cub Scouts are in kindergarten and would like to learn about recycling.
  3. Remind parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date time, and location of the meeting.  Include a physical address.  Make sure everyone completes the activity consent form.
  4. Confirm where everyone will park and meet up.

During the meeting:

  1. Take a guided tour of the recycling facility.
  2. Make sure the guide covers the basics of recycling.
  3. Questions that Cub Scouts may ask:
    • What can be recycled?
    • What cannot be recycled?
    • Why do we separate recycling from regular trash?
    • What do you do with recycled material?
    • How can we help with recycling at home?

After the meeting:

  1. Send the facility a thank you note.
You Can Recycle
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Invite a guest speaker to share how Cub Scouts can recycle in their community.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact your local recycling facility to arrange for a guest speaker to visit the den meeting to discuss how recycling works in your community.
  2. Inform the contact at the recycling facility that the Cub Scouts are in kindergarten and would like to learn about recycling.
  3. A day before, confirm with the guest speaker the date, time, and location of the meeting.  Include a physical address.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and introduce the guest speaker.
  2. Make sure the guest speaker covers the basics of recycling.
  3. Allow for questions and answers.
    • What can be recycled?
    • What cannot be recycled?
    • Why do we separate recycling from regular trash?
    • What do you do with recycled material?
    • How can we help with recycling at home?

After the meeting:

  1. Send the guest speaker a thank you note.
Participate in a conservation service project.
Dinner Time for Bees
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time5

Plant native plants that attract bees.

  • Gardening pots of any size, at least one for each Cub Scout
  • Potting soil, enough to fill gardening pots
  • Garden spades
  • Native plants, a variety that attract bees in your geographic area
    • Plants that attract bees include; bee balm, echinacea, snapdragon, and hostas
    • Wildflowers that attract bees include:  California poppies and evening primrose
  • Water
  • Covering for table

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space with tables and chairs. Protect the tabletop with newspapers or a plastic tablecloth.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with Cub Scouts the need to establish places for bees to feed. Bees are pollinators and planting flowers that bees like in a garden supports and maintains bees by supplying food in the form of pollen and nectar that will ensure that these important animals stay in the area to keep pollinating our crops for continued fruit and vegetable production. Questions to ask:
    • Why are native plants so important to bees?
    • What do bees produce as a result of pollination?
  2. Distribute gardening pots to Cub Scouts.
  3. Using a garden spade, or their hands, scoop gardening soil into pot about halfway.
  4. Add the chosen plant to the pot.  Fill the gaps with soil.
  5. Water the plant.
  6. Set the plants outside in a place that gets at least 6 hours of sun a day.
Sowing The Seeds of Love
LocationOutdoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Make “seed bombs” to plant wildflowers.

  • 1 cup of native wildflower seeds
  • 5 cups of peat-free compost
  • 5 cups of water
  • 2.5 cups of powdered clay, typically found in craft shops
  • Large mixing bowl

This activity should be done in the spring, check the growing season in your area for the best results.

Before the meeting

  1. Become familiar with how to make a “Seed Bomb.”
    • In a bowl, mix 1 cup of seeds with 5 cups of compost and 2-3 cups of clay powder. You could use clay soil instead if you have it.
    • Slowly mix in water with your hands until everything sticks together.
    • Roll the mixture into firm balls.
    • Leave the balls to dry in a sunny spot.
    • Now for the fun bit! Plant your seed bombs by throwing them at bare parts of the garden and wait to see what pops up!
  2. Prepare the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.
  3. Identify an area to plant the seed bombs, make sure to get permission.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and explain to them that in this activity you will be making a seed bomb and planting it to encourage native wildflowers to grow.  Native flowers attract pollinators like bees and butterflies that help keep other native plants healthy.
  2. Have Cub Scouts help make the mixture to make the seed bombs.
  3. Allow Cub Scouts to make their own seed bombs.
  4. Put the seed bombs out to dry.
  5. When the seed bombs are dry take Cub Scouts and adult partners to the location where the bombs seeds will be used. This may be the next meeting depending on how long the seed bombs take to dry.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Watch this video about Service Projects in Cub Scouting (6:44)

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist  to plan your den or pack service project.
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects.

During the Adventure

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults.
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines.

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