Cub-a-Palooza Registration is now open. Click for details.

Champions For Nature Tiger

Elective Adventure

As part of the World Organization of the Scouting Movement, this program is part of a global effort to teach youth about the conservation of natural resources.  This includes participating in a service project.

Requirements

Discover the difference between renewable natural resources and non-renewable natural resources.
Identify Renewable and Non-renewable
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Identify pictures of items that are renewable resources and non-renewable resources.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, pages 29 and 30
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with what a renewable resource and a non-renewable resource is.
    • Renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that can be replenished at the rate it is used.  For example, bamboo flooring, bamboo can be grown at the rate at which it is used.
    • Non-renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that cannot be replenished at all or it takes longer to replenish than the rate at which it is being used.
  2. Set up the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts to complete the activity on page 29 of the Tiger handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Define renewable resources and non-renewable resources.
  2. Instruct the Cub Scout to circle the items on page 29 of the Tiger handbook that are renewable resources and place an “x” on those items that are non-renewable.
  3. Instruct the Cub Scout to color the items on page 30 that are natural resources.
  4. Ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what are some things that they use every day that are renewable resources.
Renewable Resource Walk
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Walk outside and point out items that are made from or use renewable resources and things that are made from or use non-renewable resources.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, pages 29 and 30
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with what a renewable resource and a non-renewable resource is.
    • Renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that can be replenished at the rate it is used.  For example, bamboo flooring, bamboo can be grown at the rate at which it is used.
    • Non-renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that cannot be replenished at all or it takes longer to replenish than the rate at which it is being used.
  2. Identify a safe area for the den to take a walk outside of your regular meeting location.
  3. Walk the route you plan to take with your den and identify items that are renewable and non-renewable items that you can point out to the den.

During the meeting:

  1. Define renewable resources and non-renewable resources.
  2. Lead Cub Scouts and adult partners on a walk outside to identify renewable and non-renewable items.
  3. Instruct the Cub Scout to circle the items on page 29 of the Tiger handbook that are renewable resources and place an “x” on those items that are non-renewable.
  4. Instruct the Cub Scout to color the items on page 30 that are natural resources.
  5. Ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what are some things that they use every day that are renewable resources.
Renewable Show And Tell
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts bring everyday items from home and the den will sort them as made from renewable or non-renewable resources.

  • Cub Scouts are asked to bring three everyday items from home
  • As a backup have the following items:
  • Renewable items
    • Toothpick made from wood
    • Towel made from cotton
    • A glass cup
  • Nonrenewable items
    • Plastic trash bag
    • AA Battery
    • Aluminum foil
  • Cub Scouts will need their Tiger handbook, pages 29 and 30
  • Pencils or pens, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with what a renewable resource and a non-renewable resource is.
    • Renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that can be replenished at the rate it is used.  For example, bamboo flooring, bamboo can be grown at the rate at which it is used.
    • Non-renewable resources are physical materials that humans need and value that cannot be replenished at all or it takes longer to replenish than the rate at which it is being used.
  2. A week before the meeting remind adult partners, parents, and legal guardians that you would like Cub Scouts to bring three items that are everyday items from your house.   Explain the purpose is to identify items made from renewable and non-renewable resources.

During the meeting:

  1. Define renewable resources and non-renewable resources.
  2. Have Cub Scouts show and talk about the items they brought.  Ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners if they think an item is made from renewable or non-renewable resources.  Keep in mind that something can be made from a non-renewable resource and still be recycled.  This activity is about the resource it is made from, not if it can be recycled.
  3. Instruct the Cub Scout to circle the items on page 29 of the Tiger handbook that are renewable resources and place an “x” on those items that are non-renewable.
  4. Instruct the Cub Scout to color the items on page 30 that are natural resources.
Learn about the 3 R’s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
Reduce, Reuse, Or Recycle?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Play a guessing game of items that can be recycled, reused, or reduced.

  • Dry erase board, chalkboard, or flipchart
  • Markers or chalk if using a chalkboard
  • Stopwatch

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the 3 R’s – Recycle, Reuse, and Reduce.
  2. Recycling is converting waste into reusable material.  For example, we can take some plastics once we are done using them, they can be melted back down and used again.
  3. Reuse is when we take an item that was used once and instead of throwing it away, we use it again.  When we use that item again it may be for a different purpose than the original one.  Check out some examples at Go Green Projects in Scout Life magazine.
  4. Reducing the amount of trash or waste we generate.  Avoiding things that are disposable in place of things that can be reused.  Examples include avoiding items that have excessive packaging and buying the proper amount instead of overbuying items that spoil or go bad.
  5. Set up the meeting space so that the den can be divided into two teams and have access to the dry erase board.

During the meeting:

  1. Divide the den into two teams, keeping Cub Scouts and adult partners together.
  2. Explain the rules of the game.
    • The first team will pick someone to draw on the dry-erase board.  The den leader says one of the three R’s – recycle, reduce, or reuse and the person drawing will draw something that matches that R.  For example, if the word recycle is said then the person drawing will draw something that can be recycled.
    • As the person is drawing their team has 60 seconds to guess what the item is.  If they guess the item correctly the team gets a point.  If the item is something that matches what was called out the team gets another point.   In the example above if the team guesses the item and it is something that can be recycled then the team gets two points.  If the team guesses the item but it is not something that can be recycled, then the team gets one point.
    • Teams take turns.
    • Each member of the team must draw at least once.
    • The team that has the most points after each member of their team has drawn wins.
Solar Powered S’more Oven
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Reduce the use of electricity by making a solar powered oven

  • A sunny day
  • Tin foil
  • Glue
  • Black marker
  • Plastic wrap
  • Ruler, one for each Cub Scout
  • Scissor, one for each Cub Scout
  • Skewer, one for each Cub Scout
  • 7” unused pizza box, one for each Cub Scout
  • Black paper, the size of the pizza box
  • Tape
  • Utility knife, one for each Adult Partner
  • Graham crackers
  • Marshmallows
  • Chocolate bars

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the 3 R’s – Recycle, Reuse, and Reduce.
    • Recycling is converting waste into reusable material.  For example, we can take some plastics once we are done using them, they can be melted back down and used again.
    • Reuse is when we take an item that was used once and instead of throwing it away, we use it again.  When we use that item again it may be for a different purpose than the original one.  Check out some examples at Go Green Projects in Scout Life magazine.
    • Reducing the amount of trash or waste we generate.  Avoiding things that are disposable in place of things that can be reused.  Examples include avoiding items that have excessive packaging and buying the proper amount instead of overbuying items that spoil or go bad.
  2. Review How to Make a Solar-Powered Oven for Outdoor Cooking at Scout Life magazine
  3. Check out 11 Tasty S’Mores Recipes at Scout Life magazine

During the meeting:

  1. Explain the 3 R’s of recycle, reuse, and reduce to the den.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners work together.
  3. Explain that today by making a solar powered oven we are going to reduce our use of electricity to cook.
  4. Use a ruler and marker to outline the top of the pizza box about 1 inch inward from each edge. This will create a square on top of the box.
  5. Have adult partners carefully cut the front and sides of the square. Leave the back attached. Fold back the flap.
  6. Line the inside of the square flap with foil, and glue it down shiny side up. Keep the foil as smooth as possible. Fold and glue down any excess foil to the back of the flap or trim it to fit.
  7. Repeat Step C to line the bottom of the box. Next, glue a sheet of black paper on top of the foil. This will help your oven absorb heat.
  8. Fold back the flap. Cover the opening with a layer of plastic wrap. Using tape, attach the wrap to the 1″ sides on top of the pizza box. Make sure there are no holes in the plastic wrap. The opening needs to be sealed completely. Optional: You can also line the inside of the opening with plastic wrap to ensure air won’t get through.
  9. It’s time to cook! Once you have your food (s’more, cookies, etc.) inside your oven on a piece of foil or small aluminum pan, close the box. On one side, place the tip of a wooden skewer between the closed lid and the edge of the box. Tape the other tip of the skewer to the square flap to help prop it up.
  10. Place your solar cooker outside with the flap angled directly at the sun. This will let the foil reflect the sun and cook your food. Time will vary depending on the outside temperature, the sun and the dish you decide to cook.
The 3 R’s Of Our Den Meeting Space
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Take a walk around your den meeting location and point out what items can be recycled, reused, and/or reduced.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the 3 R’s – Recycle, Reuse, and Reduce.
    • Recycling is converting waste into reusable material.  For example, we can take some plastics once we are done using them, they can be melted back down and used again.
    • Reuse is when we take an item that was used once and instead of throwing it away, we use it again.  When we use that item again it may be for a different purpose than the original one.  Check out some examples at Go Green Projects in Scout Life magazine.
    • Reducing the amount of trash or waste we generate.  Avoiding things that are disposable in place of things that can be reused.  Examples include avoiding items that have excessive packaging and buying the proper amount instead of overbuying items that spoil or go bad.
  2. Identify items at your den meeting location that could be recycled, reused, and/or reduced.  Remember some items may fit more than one category.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain the 3 R’s of recycle, reuse, and reduce to the den.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners work together.
  3. You will call our one of the three R’s – recycle, reuse, or reduce.  When you do so Cub Scouts with their adult partners will have 10 seconds to find something in the meeting location that can be what was called out and stand next to it.  For example, if you call out reduce, Cub Scouts and adult partners may stand next to a sink because we can reduce the amount of water we use when washing our hands by turning the sink off when we are washing.
  4. Once everyone has found an item, have the Cub Scouts explain why they picked that item.  If the same item was picked by more than one Cub Scout and adult partner team pick a Cub Scout to explain why they picked that item.
  5. Continue to call out one of the three R’s until you have called out each R at least twice.
Discover what happens to the garbage in your community
Den Outing To Waste Management
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Den outing to a waste management facility

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact your local waste management facility to arrange a tour of a facility where waste is processed.
  2. Inform the contact at waste management that the Cub Scouts are in 1st grade and would like to learn what happens to the garbage when it is picked up from their house.
  3. Remind parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date time, and location of the meeting.  Include a physical address.
  4. Confirm where everyone will park and meet up.

During the meeting:

  1. Take a guided tour of the waste management facility.
  2. Make sure the guide covers what happens to the garbage in the community.

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the facility and send.
The Journey Of A Piece Of Garbage
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts will learn about the journey a piece of garbage takes and then act it out in a skit.

  •  No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Learn what happens to garbage in your community by visiting a local waste management site or government site.
  2. Most garbage in communities is collected and managed the same way.
    • Garbage, non-recyclables, are collected using garbage trucks.
    • Garbage trucks unload at a waste disposal processing facility.
    • The garbage is then sorted.
    • Some garbage is recycled or composted, some may be used for waste-to-energy facilities, and some will be sent to landfills.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and ask them what do they think happens to a piece of trash they pick up and put into a garbage can.
  2. Guide the discussion to what you have learned about how waste is managed in your community. For example, you may learn how successful the recycling program in your community is or where the landfill is located that is used by your community.
  3. Once you have walked through how garbage is managed in your community give the den time to come up with a skit that describes what they learned. Perhaps someone is a paper plate that gets used and takes the journey with other members of the den acting out the different stages the plate goes through.
  4. Have the den perform the skit.
Participate in a conservation project.
Clothing Drive – Reuse
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time4

Conduct a clothing drive for a local charity.

  • 18” x 14” x 12” cardboard boxes, one for each collection site
  • 11” x 17” pieces of paper, one for each Cub Scout
  • Markers and crayons, enough to share

This activity will take two meetings.  One will be for Cub Scouts to decorate boxes and posters for the clothing drive.  The other will be collecting and donating clothes.  

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a local homeless or transitional shelter that takes clothing donations.  Meet with them to discuss conducting a clothing drive and identify details and dates.
  2. Share details of the drive with all parents, legal guardians, and adult partners in the den.

During the meeting:

  1. Inform Cub Scouts of the organization that will benefit from conducting the clothing drive.  Include who they serve and the need for clothes.
  2. Explain that today the den will decorate donation boxes and make promotional posters.
  3. Explain that the posters and collection boxes should include the date when the clothes will be collected, the pack number and den, what type of clothes are needed, and the name of the organization who will receive the clothing.

After the meeting:

  1. Deliver the donation boxes to the agreed-upon collection locations.
  2. After one week collect the boxes and deliver them to the organization you collected them for.
  3. At the next pack meeting ask Cubmaster to recognize the den for their project.
Plant It And The Butterflies Will Come
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time5

Plant a butterfly garden.

  • Buddleias (butterfly bush) potted plants, one per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Small shovels, one per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Work gloves, one pair per Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with planting in your area by visiting the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map.
  2. Identify an area where plants can be planted and get permission to do so.  Consider the following;
    • Local Scout camp or service center
    • A local park or city building
    • School
    • Chartered partner
  3. Secure plants. Buddleias are plants that attract butterflies and are easy to care for.  Other plants that attract butterflies include Coneflowers, Lantana, Lavander, and Milkweed.
  4. Once the location is secure, provide address and directions to the adult partners in the den.
  5. Remind everyone to bring clothes that can get dirty and appropriate footwear.
  6. Remind everyone to bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials and work gloves.

During the meeting

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and share with them that the plant you are planting will help attract butterflies and other insects that help keep plants healthy.  Butterflies, bees, and other insects are known as pollinators.  Pollinators feed off the flowers and as they do so pollen sticks to them, and they carry it to other flowers that helps the flowers grow.
  2. Gather the den and demonstrate the proper way to plant.
    • Loosen the soil from 12 to 15 inches deep and mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost.
    • Dig a hole twice the diameter of the plant container.
    • When placing the plant in the hole, the top of the root ball should be level with the soil surface. Gently backfill the hole around the root ball. Firm the soil.
  3. Water thoroughly.
  4. Show the Cub Scouts and adult partners where they can plan the seedlings.
  5. Plant the Buddleias.
  6. Clean up.
Plastic Bottle Planter – Reuse
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Turn a plastic bottle into an indoor planter.

One of each of the following for each Cub Scout:

  • An empty two-liter plastic bottle
  • Scissors
  • Push pin
  • 1 cup of gravel
  • 4 cups of potting soil
  • Radish seeds
  • Tape

Before the meeting:

  1. Discover how to make a planter by reviewing Reuse a 2-Liter Plastic Bottle to Grow Plants on Scout Life magazine.
  2. Set up meeting space to allow space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to make planters.
  3. Arrange the materials needed for a planter at a place for each Cub Scout and adult partner.
  4. Protect the floor from spilling gravel or potting soil.
  5. Make a sample planter to use for a demonstration.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and have them take a spot where they will make their planter.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that this craft is going to take something that has already been used once and reuse it for something else.  That they will be taking a 2-liter bottle that had a drink in it and turn it into a planter instead of throwing it away.
  3. Walk the Cub Scouts and adult partners through each step of making their planter.
  4. Remove the label from the bottle. If the label doesn’t come off easily, fill the bottle with warm tap water until the water rises above the label. Let stand for 10 or 15 minutes. The label should peel off easily.
  5. Measure four inches down from the plastic bottle cap. Draw a line and cut off the bottle top at this point.
    Place a thin layer of small rocks or gravel in the bottom of the bottle for drainage. Fill halfway with potting soil. Following the instructions on the seed package, plant the seeds. Water just a sprinkle — too much and you’ll drown your plants.
  6. With a pushpin, make several holes in the top of the bottle cap. (It’s easier than it sounds.) Screw cap onto cutoff top of bottle. This is now the lid of your greenhouse bottle. Carefully place on top of the bottle, securing it with a small piece of tape on one side.
  7. Set the bottle in a sunny place and wait for your seeds to sprout. When they get about an inch high, remove the bottle top and let the plants grow until you are ready to transplant outdoors or into another pot.

Tip: Single-serving-size plastic bottles work equally well, only you can’t get as many plants in them. For these smaller greenhouses, measure down 3 1⁄2 inches from the top instead of 4 inches.

Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Watch this video about Service Projects in Cub Scouting (6:44)

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist  to plan your den or pack service project.
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects.

During the Adventure

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults.
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines.

Join our email list

Get the latest news and information from the Pack.

This website is independently operated and is not sponsored by, endorsed by, or affiliated with the Boy Scouts of America. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author alone and in no way represent the views of the Boy Scouts of America. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA®, the BSA Universal Emblem, the Venturing diamond logo, and all other related marks are trademarks owned exclusively by the Boy Scouts of America.  Website designed and maintained by Jake Parrott