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Champions For Nature Wolf

Elective Adventure

Planet Earth is our home. It provides us with all the things we need to live: air, water, and food. Earth also provides us with natural beauty like mountains, oceans, forests, and waterfalls. All these things are valuable resources that we need. In this Adventure, you will discover the things that you can do to help ensure the resources of Earth are taken care of and respected. Some of these things may seem small. When done by everyone, these small actions impact our world, our home, and the planet Earth.

Requirements

Discover the difference between renewable natural resources and non-renewable natural resources.
Conservation Card Game
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Card game sorting into renewable and non-renewable resources.

  • Conservation Card Deck found in Additional Resources
  • 8 ½” x 11” cardstock paper, 4 sheets for every 2 Cub Scouts
  • Printer

Before the meeting:

  1. Print and cut out Conservation Card Game, one set for every 2 Cub Scouts.

During the meeting:

  1. Talk to Cub Scouts about the difference between renewable and non-renewable resources.
  2. Buddy up the Cub Scouts.
  3. Mix each set of cards up and lay them face up in front of each pair of Cub Scouts.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to separate them into two piles: renewable and non-renewable.

Conservation Card Deck

The Great Scatter Relay
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Scouts do a relay race.

The 6 items for each category are suggestions, you may substitute other items for the categories.

  • Two large plastic bins
  • 6 Items made from wood – renewable natural resources:
    • Pencil
    • Chopsticks
    • Paper
    • Cardboard box
    • Book
    • Toothpick
  • 6 Items made from cotton or wool – renewable natural resources:
    • Sock
    • T-shirt
    • Towel
    • Sweater
    • Canvas bag
    • Pillowcase
  • 6 Items made from glass or aluminum – non-renewable natural resources:
    • Soda can
    • Glass jar
    • Tin foil
    • Can of beans
    • Aluminum roasting pan
    • Glass soda bottle
  • 6 items made from stone – non-renewable natural resources:
    • Brick
    • Ceramic coffee mug
    • Floor tile
    • Costume jewelry
    • Ceramic bowl
    • Marble

Before the Meeting:

  1. Gather items for the relay.
  2. Label bins, one “renewable” and the second “nonrenewable”.
  3. Scatter the different items around the meeting area and place the bins close to the front of the room.

During the Meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and discuss what makes a natural resource renewable. A renewable natural resource is something that can be used over and over again and cannot be used up or it can be renewed in the same time frame or shorter than it is used. For example, wind and solar power can be used repeatedly. Things like cotton or bamboo are things that can regrow at a faster rate than we use it.
  2. Cub Scouts form a line.
  3. One at a time, Cub Scouts run to any item. They decide if the item they’ve chosen is made from a renewable or renewable resource. Once they have made their choice, they place the item into the appropriate bin.
  4. Once Cub Scout places their item into a bin, they run back to the line and tag the next person to go.
  5. After all the items have been placed into the bins, check to see which items were sorted correctly.
  6. If the item is placed in the wrong bin, have a discussion with the Cub Scouts about the choice and place in the correct bin.

Tip: The 6 items for each category are suggestions, you may substitute other items for the categories.

Water Pollution Poster
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts create a poster of how a waterway may become polluted.

  • Large poster board 22”x28”
  • Markers and crayons
  • Construction paper
  • Tape or glue
  • Scissors

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather supplies on a table large enough to accommodate your Cub Scout den.

 

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to think of items that can pollute a creek or lake. Some questions you may ask:
    • What different forms of pollution do you know of?
    • What is water pollution?
    • Where does water pollution come from?
    • How do we detect water pollution?
    • What do you do that adds to pollution?
    • What do you do that helps reduce pollution?
    • How does pollution affect your health?
  2. Help Cub Scouts create a poster of a waterway and how it may become polluted.
Learn about the 3 R’s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
Compost Jar
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List5
Prep Time4

Make a composting jar and how using compost connects to the 3 Rs.

  • 24 oz. glass jar with lid (washed spaghetti glass jar with lid)
  • 2” penny nails, one for each Cub Scout
  • 1 page of newspaper, one for each Cub Scout
  • 1 cup of dirt for each Cub Scout, use dirt from outside, not potting soil
  • Compost materials, 6 ounces for each Cub Scout, enough to fill the jar a ¼ of the way full
    • Banana peel
    • Eggshells
    • Grass clippings
    • Vegetable scraps
  • 2 ounces of dead leaves for each Cub Scout
  • Spray bottle
  • One paper plate for each Cub Scout

Before the Meeting:

  1. Gather 24 oz. spaghetti glass jars and wash them.
  2. Gather compost materials, enough for each scout.
  3. Gather dirt, shredded newspaper, and dead leaves.
  4. Fill a spray bottle with clean water.
  5. Collect the nails and paper plates.

During the Meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts that a Scout is Thrifty. Ask them what being thrifty means to them and allow them to use their handbooks for a definition.
    • A Scout is THRIFTY. Work to pay your own way. Don‘t be wasteful. Use time, property, and natural resources wisely.
    • Inform the Cub Scouts that since we want to be thirty and not waste, one way we can reduce or eliminate waste is by the 3 R’s of recycling – reduce, reuse, recycle.
    • Inform the Cub Scouts that we can reduce the amount of something we use. We can reuse things a second time either for the same purpose they were designed for or to use them in a different way. We can recycle things by breaking them down into their raw materials and making something new from them.
    • Inform Cub Scouts that today we are going to use reuse spaghetti jars and we are going to reduce our waste by creating a composting jar.
    • A composting jar is a way to take some types of trash and instead of putting it into the garbage we can break it down to create soil that can be used for planting or fertilizing plants.
  2. With the help of a parent or legal guardian, tell Cub Scouts to use the nail to punch eight to ten holes in the top of their lid.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to place their glass jar onto their paper plate.
  4. Tell Cub Scouts to layer the following into their jar, in this order:
    • Dirt
    • Shredded newspaper
    • Dead leaves
  5. Spray the paper and dirt until moist.
  6. Add compost materials.
  7. Spray the compost materials until moist.
  8. Cub Scouts will now put the lid onto their coffee can and place it in a sunny spot in their home. In about a month they will start to see the breakdown of the materials as what trash was before it turns into compost.
  9. Remind Cub Scout to turn the jar around once a week and add a small amount of water each day, this will help the materials break down faster.

Tip: Make sure Cub Scouts understand that the more compost materials they add at home, the longer the project will take to complete.

Tip: Remind Cub Scouts and adults, that they will see fluffy mold growing through this process, so always keep it covered when they’re not working with the compost and always wash hands when they’re finished.

After the Meeting:

  1. Cub Scouts will spray water into their compost jar every day.
  2. Cub Scouts can continue to add compost materials to their jar.
  3. Every 3-4 days Cub Scouts will shake their compost jar to mix the compost materials.
  4. Once the compost materials have completely broken down, the Cub Scouts can use it to plant seeds to grow a plant.
Three R’s Sorting Relay Race
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time2

In teams, Cub Scouts will race to sort items into the different 3 R’s categories.

  • Two large plastic bins, approximately 15-to-20-quart size
  • 6 items that can be reused
    • Book
    • Reusable shopping bag
    • Spoon
    • Water bottle
    • Cloth napkin
    • Food storage container of any size
  • 6 items that can be recycled
    • Glass jar
    • Soda can
    • Cardboard box
    • Plastic water bottle
    • Plastic shopping bag
    • Paper shopping bag

Before the Meeting:

  1. Gather items for the relay.
  2. Label bins “Reuse” and “Recycle.”
  3. Scatter the different items around the meeting area and place the bins close to the front of the room.

During the Meeting:

  1. Share with the Cub Scouts that a Scout is Thrifty. Ask them what being thrifty means to them and allow them to use their handbooks for a definition.
    • A Scout is THRIFTY. Work to pay your own way. Don‘t be wasteful. Use time, property, and natural resources wisely.
    • Inform the Cub Scouts that since we want to be thirty and not waste, one way we can reduce or eliminate waste is by the 3 R’s of recycling – reduce, reuse, recycle.
    • Inform the Cub Scouts that we can reduce the amount of something we use. We can reuse things a second time either for the same purpose they were designed for or to use them in a different way. We can recycle things by breaking them down into their raw materials and making something new from them.
  2. Discuss how Cub Scouts can reduce the amount of things they use.
    • Food – only make or order what you will eat, save leftovers, and eat them.
    • Water – turn the water off when brushing your teeth or when washing your hands.
    • Electricity – turn lights and other electronic devices off when not using them.
  3. Explain the rules of the game.
  4. Have Cub Scouts form a line.
  5. One at a time, Cub Scouts run to any item. They decide if the item they’ve that could be reused or recycled. Once they have made their choice, they place the item into the appropriate bin.
  6. Once Cub Scout places their item into a bin, they run back to the line and tag the next person to go.
  7. After all the items have been placed into the bins, check to see which items were sorted correctly.
  8. If the item is placed in the wrong bin, have a discussion with the Cub Scouts about the choice and place in the correct bin.
Tour Electronic Disposal Center
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time3

Visit an electronics or appliance disposal center and learn how they take apart items to recycle and reuse.

Before the Meeting:

  1. Locate an electronic or appliance disposal center and schedule a visit.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts’ parent or legal guardian about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting location.
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.
  3. Have Cub Scouts thank the person who guided the tour.

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the facility and send.
Discover what happens to the recyclables in your community.
Recycle Plant Tour
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time3

Tour a local recycle management facility.

Before the Meeting:

  1. Call a local recycling management facility and schedule a visit.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts’ parent or legal guardian about the visit and ask them to fill out an Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the meeting location.
  2. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.
  3. Have Cub Scouts thank the person who guided the tour.

After the meeting:

  1. Write a thank you note to the facility and send.
Speak With A Recycling Professional
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time3

Invite someone from your local recycle management facility to visit your den meeting.

  • Recycling facility professional

Before the meeting:

  1. Call a local recycling plant and ask for someone to visit your den meeting to talk about what happens to recyclables at their facility.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that their guest will be sharing what happens to recyclables at their facility.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts to listen carefully and encourage them to ask questions.

After the meeting:

  1. Send the guest speaker a thank you note.
Participate in a conservation project.
Garden Pollinator
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts build a pollinator garden.

  • Gardening pots of any size, at least one for each Cub Scouts
  • Potting soil, enough to fill gardening pots
  • Garden spades
  • Native plants, a variety that attract bees and butterflies in your geographic area
    • Aromatic herbs such as coriander, catnip, mint, parsley, lavender
    • Annuals such as marigold, phlox, bachelor’s button, zinnia, cosmos, salvia
    • Perennials such as bee balm, Shasta daisy, iris, coneflower, lobelia, delphinium
  • Water
  • Covering for table

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space with tables and chairs. Protect the tabletop with newspapers or a plastic tablecloth.

During the meeting:

  1. Share with Cub Scouts the need to establish places for bees and butterflies to feed. Pollinator gardens support and maintain pollinators by supplying food in the form of pollen and nectar that will ensure that these important animals stay in the area to keep pollinating our crops for continued fruit and vegetable production. Questions to ask:
    • Why are native plants so important to our pollinators?
    • Why is it important to include a variety of plants in our garden?
  2. Distribute gardening pots to Cub Scouts.
  3. Using a garden spade, or their hands, scoop gardening soil into pot about halfway.
  4. Add the chosen plant to the pot. Fill the gaps with soil.
  5. Water the plant.
  6. Set the plants outside in a place that gets at least 6 hours of sun a day.
Recycling Roundup
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts start a recycling program at pack events.

  • 3 large bins, 15 to 20 quart in size
  • 3 posterboards, 11”x17” each
  • Markers or crayons
  • Tape

Before the meeting:

  1. Speak to the Cubmaster and ask for some time at the next pack meeting for the Cub Scouts to explain the establishment of a recycling program at pack events.
  2. With the pack committee, establish a method of using the bins that the Cub Scouts will be creating to pack meetings, activities, and campouts.

During the den meeting:

  1. Discuss with Cub Scouts the concepts of reduce, reuse, and recycle. Ask them to share ideas on how they can each reduce, reuse, and recycle.
    • Reduce means to use less.
    • Reuse means to use something more than once.
    • Recycle means to make new items out of old ones.
  2. Share with Cub Scouts that they will be establishing recycling bins for their pack to use at meetings, activities, and campouts.
  3. Using the posterboard, have Cub Scouts create three signs:
    • Paper and cardboard
    • Bottles and cans
    • Plastic
  4. Tape one sign to each bin.
  5. Work with Cub Scouts to decide who will be speaking at the next pack meeting about reduce, reuse, recycle and the recycling program for the pack. Encourage the Cub Scouts to have each of them speak about one point.

At the pack meeting:

  1. Cub Scouts explain the concepts of reduce, reuse, and recycle to their fellow Cub Scouts.
  2. Cub Scouts show the recycling bins and ask that they be used at pack meetings, campouts, and pack activities.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Watch this video about Service Projects in Cub Scouting (6:44)

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:

  • Use the Service Project Planning Checklist to plan your den or pack service project.
  • Review the SAFE Project Tool Use is an at-a-glance reference for service projects, not crafts.  It includes age guidelines for tools and types of allowed activities allowed for service projects.

During the Adventure

  • Give time for proper training on the use of the tools that will be used to complete the project to all youth and adults.
  • Provide continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project.
  • Following all manufacturer’s literature and age and skill restrictions shall supersede the recommendations in the publication. If there is a conflict, leaders shall follow the most restrictive guidelines.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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