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First Aid

Required Adventure

In this Adventure, you will learn how to protect yourself and how to help others when they have been hurt. The skills you learn in this Adventure could help someone in trouble or even save a life. Your patrol may have a trained professional like an emergency medical technician (EMT), medical doctor, or registered nurse provide instruction for this Adventure.

Requirements

With permission from your parent or legal guardian, watch the Protect Yourself Rules video for the Arrow of Light rank.
Protect Yourself Rules Arrow Of Light
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Watch the Protect Yourself Rules video with your parent or legal guardian.

  • AOL First Aid 1 Parent Notification found in Additional Resources
  • Computer or smart device
  • Internet connection to view the “Protect Yourself Rules Arrow of Light” video (duration 22 minutes)
  • Or download video onto device if internet is not available where you will be watching.

Before the meeting:

  1. Inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “AOL First AId 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1

During the meeting or at home:

  1. Parent or legal guardian watch the ”Protect Yourself Rules” video with their Cub Scout.

AOL First Aid 1 Parent Notification

Explain what you should do if you encounter someone in need of first aid.
First Aid First Response
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts explain what to do if they encounter someone who needs first aid.

  • Emergency Contact Information found in Additional Resources or Arrow of Light handbook
  • Pen or pencil, one for each Cub Scout
  • Parents and legal guardians or den chief

Before the meeting:

  1. Print Emergency Contact Information worksheet for each Cub Scout.
  2. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to fill out worksheet. Set up additional space that is free of obstacles, allowing Cub Scouts to have room to practice first aid response.

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts fill out the Emergency Contact Information worksheet. Discuss where this might be placed in their home for easy access. Explain to Cub Scouts what they should do when encountering an emergency that requires first aid:
    • Check. Make sure the scene is safe before approaching. You can’t help anyone if you become a victim yourself.
    • Calm down and think. Take a couple of seconds to assess the situation and decide what needs to be done. Staying calm may be hard to do, but it’s important. The victim will feel better knowing you are in control, and you will be able to make better decisions than if you were panicked.
    • Call. If the victim seems badly hurt, send someone to call for medical help. If no one is there to do that, call for help and offer to assist the victim.
    • Care. Explain that you know first aid and get permission to treat the victim before doing anything else. When sending someone to get help, point at a specific person and say something like, “Juan, go call 911 and ask for an ambulance.” Don’t assume everybody knows what to do.
    • Do not move a badly hurt person unless they are in further danger. It may be necessary to move a person if there is a nearby fire or if the person is lying in the road. But never move an injured person unless it is absolutely necessary. Check the victim for “hurry cases.”
    • Treat the victim for shock.
  2. Have Cub Scouts buddy up. Assign an adult to each buddy group.
  3. Have one Cub Scout be the victim and the other Cub Scout be the responder. The adult will be the victim in need of first aid. Tell Cub Scouts that as buddies they come upon the “victim” and must act out what they should do.
  4. Practice until Cub Scouts are comfortable.
Demonstrate what to do for hurry cases of first aid: serious bleeding, heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest, stopped breathing, stroke, poisoning.
“Hurry” Cases
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts demonstrate what to do for first aid “hurry” cases.

  • Serious bleeding first aid items, one set for every 2 Cub Scouts
    • Disposable, latex-free gloves
    • Eye protection
    • Neckerchief
  • Heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest, stopped breathing first aid items, one set for every Cub Scout
    • CPR breathing barrier
  • Parents and legal guardians or den chief

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space free of obstacles and allow for Cub Scouts to have room to move about.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts they will be demonstrating different types of first aid during this den meeting.
  2. Review the 3 C’s:
    • Check- Make sure the scene is safe for you. And then check the victim.
    • Call- Call 911. Call out for help and send two people for help.
    • Care-Care for the victim to the best of your ability while you wait for help to arrive.
  3. Practice serious bleeding. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up. Provide each set of buddies a set of supplies: disposable, latex-free gloves, eye protection, and neckerchief. Ask each set of buddies to decide who will be playing the victim first. Explain that they will each have a turn to be the victim.  Assign a parent or legal guardian or den chief to each set of buddies. The adult would be the person for the “Call” in the 3 C’s.
    • Assign each buddy group a wound area: leg, arm, head.
    • The victim should pretend to have a bleeding wound on the assigned area.
    • The responder will initiate the 3 C’s and attend to the wound.
    • When the serious bleeding wounds have been treated, review the results of each buddy group.
    •  Ask the following questions:
      • What should you do if you think the bone is broken? (try not to move it, but maintain pressure)
      • What can we apply pressure within an emergency situation? (hand, fabric or gauze)
    • Switch responder and victim and repeat exercise.
  4. Practice heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest and stopped breathing. Explain that the response to these two situations is the same. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up. Provide each set of buddies a CPR breathing barrier. Ask each set of buddies to decide who will be playing the victim first. Explain that they will each have a turn to be the victim. Assign a parent or legal guardian or den chief to each set of buddies. The adult would be the person for the “Call” in the 3 C’s.
  5. Demonstrate how to do CPR on another adult.
    • Place the person on their back on a firm, flat surface. Stand or kneel beside the person.
    • Give 30 chest compressions
      • Hand position: Two hands centered on the chest
      • Body position: Shoulders directly over hands; elbows locked
      • Depth: At least 2 inches
      • Rate: 100 to 120 per minute
      • Allow chest to return to normal position after each compression
    • Give 2 pretend breaths
      • Open the airway to a past-neutral position using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique
      • Pinch the nose shut, take a normal breath. Tell Cub Scouts in an emergency they will make a complete seal over the person’s mouth with their mouth. But for this demonstration they can just blow onto the stuffed animal’s mouth without touching it, like blowing out a candle.
      • Ensure each breath lasts about 1 second and makes the chest rise; allow air to exit before giving the next breath
    • Tell Cub Scouts they will need to call 911, explain the situation, then continue to do this pattern until help arrives.
    • Discuss the different signs for a heart attack, cardiac arrest, and stopped breathing, The 3 C’s may be different for each situation.
    • Assign each buddy group either a heart attack, cardiac arrest or stopped breathing.
    • Tell Cub Scouts that they will practice CPR with their buddy. The responder will initiate the 3 C’s.
  6. Switch responder and victim and repeat exercise. Practice stroke. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up. Ask each set of buddies to decide who will be playing the victim first. Explain that they will each have a turn to be the victim. Assign a parent or legal guardian or den chief to each set of buddies. The adult would be the person for the “Call” in the 3 C’s.
    • The victim should pretend to have a stroke,
    • The responder will initiate the 3 C’s looking for face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty and time to call for help.
    • Switch responder and victim and repeat exercise.
    • Review the FAST acronym:
      • Face Drooping
      • Arm weakness
      • Speech difficulty
      • Time to call for help
  7. Ask the following:
  8. Practice poisoning. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up. Ask each set of buddies to decide who will be playing the victim first. Explain that they will each have a turn to be the victim. Assign a parent or legal guardian or den chief to each set of buddies. The adult would be the person for the “Call” in the 3 C’s.
    • Assign each buddy group a different poison: eating a poisonous mushroom, swallowing a household cleaning product, taking too much medicine, breathing toxic fumes.
    • Each buddy group demonstrates the 3 C’s based on the type of poisoning.
    • Ask the following questions for each demonstration:
      • What do we need to do if someone has swallowed or breathed something toxic?
      • How do we keep ourselves and others safe from being poisoned?
Visit A Paramedic
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Visit an  emergency services station and do some hands-on learning from a professional

This activity is designed to complete requirements  3, 4, 5, and 6.

Before the meeting:

  1. Contact a local emergency services or American Red Cross and confirm a date and time for a visit.
  2. Inform the contact that the den is made up of fifth graders and they are learning about first aid. Let your contact know what needs to be covered:
    • serious bleeding, heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest, stopped breathing, stroke, poisoning
    • choking
    • shock
    • cuts and scratches, burns, and scalds, bites and stings of insects and animals, and nosebleed
  3. Remind parents and legal guardians of the meeting location date and time and bring a completed Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts outside the fire station. Let them know that they will be learning about first aid. Remind them that if the first responders are alerted to an emergency that they are to do quickly and quietly move out of the way.
  2. Ensure that the requirements are completed. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.
Demonstrate how to help a choking victim.
Heimlich Maneuver
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts demonstrate how to perform the Heimlich maneuver.

  • Parents and legal guardians

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space free of obstacles and allow for Cub Scouts to have room to move about.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts they will be demonstrating the Heimlich maneuver.
  2. Demonstrate the Heimlich maneuver on another adult.
    • Give five back blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of your hand.
    • If the object is not removed, give abdominal thrusts:
      • Position yourself behind the person and reach your arms around their waist.
      • Make a fist with one hand just above the person’s belly button. Cover the fist with your other hand.
      • Make a series of five quick thrusts inward and upward to force air from the lungs. (Pretend like you’re trying to pick the person up.)
    • Alternate between abdominal thrusts and back blows until the object is dislodged, the person becomes unconscious, or medical help arrives.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up and practice on one another. Remind them to not give full abdominal thrusts or back blows.
Demonstrate how to treat shock.
Shock First Aid
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts demonstrate how to treat shock.

  • Parents and legal guardians

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space free of obstacles and allow for Cub Scouts to have room to move about.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts they will be learning how to treat shock.
  2. Demonstrate how to treat shock on another adult.
    • Pretend to call 911 for emergency help immediately.
    • Have a Cub Scout lie down on their back.
    • Say and demonstrate, “raise their feet slightly and state unless you think there are injuries to the head, neck, back, hips, or legs. If you do not know, have the person lie flat.”
    • Say and demonstrate, “If the person is not awake, turn them on their side. But first, be sure the person has no injuries to the head, neck, or back.”
    • Say “If the weather is cool, cover the person with a sheet. If it is hot, do not.”
    • Say “Do not give the person anything to eat or drink.”
    • Say “Stay with the person until help arrives.”
  3. Ask Cub Scouts to buddy up and practice on one another.
Demonstrate how to treat the following: cuts and scratches, burns and scalds, bites and stings of insects and animals, and nosebleed.
Common First Aid Practices
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts learn how to treat common first aid needs.

  • Cuts and scratches station
    • Bowl with water
    • Soap
    • Hand towel
    • First aid ointment
    • Latex free gloves
    • Eye protection
    • Sterile gauze pad
    • First aid tape
  • Burns and scalds station
    • Two bowls with water
    • Soap
    • Hand towel
    • Sterile gauze pad
    • Aloe vera or cooling lotion
  • Bites and Stings station
    • Bowl with water
    • Soap
    • Hand towel
    • Tweezers
    • Playing card or credit card
    • First aid ointment
  • Nosebleed
    • Bowl of water
    • Clean cloth
  • Parents and legal guardians or den chief

Before the meeting:

  1. Familiarize yourself with first aid treatment of:
    • Cuts and scratches
    • Burns and scalds
    • Bites and stings of insects and animals
    • Nosebleeds
  2. Set up 4 stations with first aid items. One station for each the treatments to learn.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that during the den meeting, they will be learning about common first aid practices for cuts and scratches, burns and scalds, bites and stings of insects and animals, and nosebleeds .
  2. There are 4 stations set up around the room. They will visit each one and practice the first aid treatment.
  3. Assign an adult to each station. Make sure they are familiar with the first aid treatment plan for their station.
  4. Station Cuts and Scratches:
    • Start by washing hands thoroughly with soap and water.
    • For small wounds, wash the wound with soap and water. Then apply first-aid ointment to help prevent infection if you have the victim’s permission and know that they do not have an allergy to the medicine. Keep the wound clean with an adhesive bandage. Change the bandage as often as needed but at least once daily.
    • For larger cuts, first, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure. Keep the wound as clean as possible to limit infection. Cover an open wound with a sterile gauze pad or a clean cloth folded into a pad. Hold the pad in place with tape or a bandage made out of a neckerchief. Any bandage should be loose enough that you can slide two fingers between it and the person’s body. An adult leader should evaluate any large wound. Once the bleeding has stopped, clean the wound as described above.
  5. Station Burns and Scalds:
    • Treat a minor burn by putting the burn in chilly water and then cover with clean, dry, loose dressing.
    • Treat sunburn with aloe vera.
  6. Station Bites and Stings:
    • Practice removing a tick using tweezers. Grasp the tick by its head with tweezers close to the skin and gently pull until it comes loose, Wash the wound with soap and water and apply first-aid ointment.
    • Practice removing a stinger by scraping away the stinger with the edge of a card.
  7. Station Nosebleed:
    • Have the victim sit up and lean forward to prevent blood from draining into the throat.
    • Pinch the nostrils together for 10 minutes to maintain pressure on the flow and stop the bleeding.
    • Apply a cool, wet cloth to the victim’s nose and face above where you are pinching.
    • Watch for symptoms of shock and treat if needed. Call for help if the bleeding doesn’t stop after 15 minutes.
Make a personal first-aid kit. Demonstrate the proper use of each item in your first-aid kit.
DIY First Aid Kit
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time4

Cub Scouts make and demonstrate the use of a first aid kit.

  • Quart size bag, one per Cub Scout
  • Markers, one for every 2 Cub Scouts
  • Adhesive bandages
  • Moleskin
  • First-aid ointment, one per Cub Scout
  • Latex-free gloves, one set per Cub Scout

In addition to the basic items above, consider including:

  • Gauze pads
  • Adhesive tape
  • Soap
  • Scissors
  • Mouth barrier
  • Pencil and paper
  • Antiseptic wipes

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to build their first aid kit.
  2. Place items around the meeting space for Cub Scouts to gather and place in their first aid bags.
  3. Build a first aid kit using the items as a demonstration.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts they will be walking around the meeting space and building their own  first aid kit.
  2. Pass out the baggies. Ask Cub Scouts to write their name on their baggie.
  3. Have Cub Scouts walk around the space collecting the first aid items. Once they  have completed adding items to their first aid kit, bring them back to sit down and discuss the items.
  4. Open your first aid kit and pull out an item and ask the following questions:
    • When would you use this item?
    • What is the proper way to use this item?
    • What happens if this item isn’t in your kit, what could you possibly use instead?
  5. Remind Cub Scouts that a first aid kit is part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials. A, first aid is to  be always included in their pack.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure:

  • Review the  BSA Youth Protection content.
  • Review the Protect Yourself Rules-Arrow of Light video.
  • Requirement 1 may be completed at home or as a den.  Prior to the meeting inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Arrow of Light First Aid 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1.
  • Review the content for First Aid and become familiar with it to ensure proper information and techniques are being taught.
  • If you need assistance, you can seek help from a Scouts BSA Troop adult leader who has Wilderness First Aid or Standard First Aid Certification, or a medical professional, EMT, or other adult who has formal first aid training. Share with them the content for the Adventure to ensure that the content remains age-appropriate.
  • Consider becoming certified in Red Cross First Aid, learn more about the American Red Cross and BSA Training Agreement.

During the Adventure:

  • There is a chance that a child may disclose a situation that causes suspicion of abuse.  If you suspect a child is being abused follow the reporting guidelines found on the BSA Youth Protection site.

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