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Good Knights

Elective Adventure

Tigers will have fun making their own shield or coat of arms and even a castle.

Requirements

Discuss with your den or Tiger adult partner what it means to have courteous behavior, how a knight behaves. Tell another Tiger which points of the Scout Law help you to have the same Knightly behavior.
Courteous Knights
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts will act out acts of being courteous and other points of the Scout Law.

Before the meeting:

  1. Review the Scout Law and become familiar with it and how it is defined in Cub Scouting.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that a long time ago in the country of England there were warriors who fought for kings and queens, but they were not ordinary warriors, knights were special because they were expected to live by a code.  A knight was supposed to show bravery, strength, and skill in battle, to respect women, to defend the weak and the poor, to be generous to others and loyal to his lord, his family and his friends.
  2. Today in England people can still become a knight but it is now a special recognition and title that can be presented to someone by the king or queen of England.  Both women and men are knights.  Women knights in England are referred to as dames.
  3. Being a good Scout is like being a modern-day knight.  Living and acting by the Scout Oath and Law.
  4. Inform Cub Scouts that part of the Scout Law is to be courteous.  That means that we are to be polite to everyone and always use good manners.
  5. Have Cub Scouts work with their Adult Partner to come up with a way to act out the Cub Scout demonstrating being courteous.  When Cub Scouts and adult partners are ready have each pair act out their scene.
  6. After everyone has had a chance to act out a scene ask the Cub Scouts to look at the Scout Law and identify a part of the Scout Law that they feel a good knight must follow.  Don’t have them tell it to anyone but their Adult Partner.  Together the Cub Scout and Adult Partner will act out the Cub Scout demonstrating their chosen point of the Scout Law and everyone else will have to guess it.
  7. When Cub Scouts and adult partners are ready have each pair act out their scene and see if the rest of the den can guess the right point of the Scout Law.
Modern Knights
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Have a guest speaker from one of the armed services come to speak about the values and creed of their branch.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify someone in the armed services, active or retired, who can speak to the Cub Scouts about the values along with any mottos or oaths of their branch of service.
  2. Ask the quest speaker for the proper way to address them by their rank and confirm the branch of military service.
  3. Research the values, mottos, or oaths of the brank of service your guest speaker is a part of to be familiar with them and how they relate to the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that a long time ago in the country of England there were warriors who fought for kings and queens, but they were not ordinary warriors, knights were special because they were expected to live by a code.  A knight was supposed to show bravery, strength, and skill in battle, to respect women, to defend the weak and the poor, to be generous to others and loyal to his lord, his family and his friends.
  2. Today in England people can still become a knight but it is now a special recognition and title that can be presented to someone by the king or queen of England.  Both women and men are knights.  Women knights in England are referred to as dames.
  3. In America we have modern day knights.  Men and women of our armed forces are expected to live by a set of values, they have a motto, and take an oath.
  4. Introduce the guest speaker and have them discuss the values, motto, and oath their branch of service has.
  5. Allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to ask questions.
  6. Thank the guest speaker.
  7. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what was similar between the Scout Oath and Law and what the guest speaker shared.

After the meeting:

  1. Send speaker a thank you note.
Create a shield that can be for your den or a personal shield.
Den Shield
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time4

Working together as a den make a den shield.

  • 2’ x 4’  ¼” plywood
  • Table saw, FOR ADULT USE ONLY
  • pencil
  • 220 grit sandpaper
  • 1 can of spray paint primer
  • 1 can of spray paint clear coat/finish
  • Acrylic paint,  various colors
  • Craft paint brushes, enough to share
  • Bowls filled with water to wash paintbrushes
  • 1 roll of painter’s tape 1” width

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting space for painting and make sure to protect the workspace and floor.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that they will be painting during the meeting and to bring an old t-shirt or craft apron.
  3. Draw an outline of a shield on the plywood using a pencil.  Using the table saw to cut out the shield.
  4. Spray the shield with primer and let dry fully before the meeting.
  5. Use the painter’s tape to tape off a top section of the shield about 6 inches from the top.
  6. Use the painter’s tape to then create equal sections on the shield for each member of the den.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that for this activity they will design and make a den shield.   Tell them that knights in medieval times used a shield to protect themselves but they also used it to identify who they were and where they came from.  During this time most people could not read so people would use symbols instead of words.  Most shields were decorated with symbols that may show what part of the country they were from or what family they were from.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts what one symbol they would use to identify themselves with.  Have them draw that symbol on page 40 of their Tiger handbook.
  3. Once everyone has completed their drawing give each Cub Scout a section of the den shield to paint their symbol on.  Ask them to include their initials next to their symbol.
  4. As Cub Scouts are painting their symbol ask adult partners to help paint the top section.
  5. Allow the paint to dry and then spray on a coat of clear coat/finish.
Personal Little Shield
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time4

Make a personal little shield out of plywood and decorate it with paint.

  • 3” x  4” small wooden craft shield, enough for one for each Cub Scout
  • Tigers will need their Tiger handbook, page 40
  • Acrylic paint, assorted colors
  • Paint primer
  • Craft paint brushes, enough to share
  • Bowls filled with water to wash paintbrushes

Before the meeting:

  1. Purchase wooden craft shields.
  2. Set up the meeting space for painting and make sure to protect the workspace and floor.
  3. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that they will be painting during the meeting and to bring an old t-shirt or craft apron.
  4. Apply paint primer to all the shields on one side.
  5. Make a shield for yourself to use as an example and identify steps that may be a challenge for Cub Scouts.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that for this activity they will design and make their own shield.   Tell them that knights in medieval times used a shield to protect themselves but they also used it to identify who they were and where they came from.  During this time most people could not read so people would use symbols instead of words.  Most shields were decorated with symbols that may show what part of the country they were from or what family they were from.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts with their adult partners use page 40 of their Tiger handbook to come up with a design for their shield using symbols or images that they feel represent their family and where they are from.
  3. Once everyone has completed their design, Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to paint their shield.
  4. When everyone has made their shield have each Cub Scout describe their shield to the den.
Personal Shield
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts make a personal shield from project board.

  • Tigers will need their Tiger handbook, page 40
  • Project board 36” x 48”
  • Acrylic paint, assorted colors
  • Craft paint brushes, enough to share
  • Bowls filled with water to wash paintbrushes
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Scissors

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting space for painting and make sure to protect the workspace and floor.
  2. Inform Cub Scouts and adult partners that they will be painting during the meeting and to bring an old t-shirt or craft apron.
  3. Make a shield for yourself to use as an example and identify steps that may be a challenge for Cub Scouts.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that for this activity they will design and make their own shield.   Tell them that knights in medieval times used a shield to protect themselves but they also used it to identify who they were and where they came from.  During this time most people could not read so people would use symbols instead of words.  Most shields were decorated with symbols that may show what part of the country they were from or what family they were from.
  2. Have the Cub Scouts with their adult partners use page 40 of their Tiger handbook to come up with a design for their shield using symbols or images that they feel represent their family and where they are from.
  3. Once everyone has completed their design Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to cut out their shield from the project board and then paint their design onto their shield.
  4. When everyone has made their shield have each Cub Scout describe their shield to the den.
Using recycled and other materials, design and build a small castle in your den or at home.
Building Sandcastles
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Use a sandbox for the den to create a den sandcastle.

  • Large sandbox or beach
  • Sandcastle molds
  • Small buckets
  • Plastic cups
  • Craft sticks

Before the meeting: 

  1. Inform Cub Scouts and parents of the location of the meeting, either a beach or playground that has a large sandbox. 
  2. Confirm the date, time, and location with parents a day before the meeting. 
  3. Check the condition of the sand, if needed add water to make the sand sticky.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners to inform them that in this activity you will work together to design and build a castle. 
  2. Tell the Cub Scouts and adult partners that castles were built as a sign of strength.  It would not only protect the people who lived in the castle, but it also served as protection for those who lived nearby.  The walls of some castles were built to allow people to live inside the castle walls, this was usually for those who were providing skilled trades like blacksmithing, butchers, or merchants.  The farmers who supplied food to the castle lived outside of the castle walls and would seek shelter inside the walls during an attack.   
  3. Have all the Cub Scouts with their adult partners make a big sandcastle together.
Castle Made Of Building Blocks
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List4
Prep Time2

Make a castle using modular building blocks such as Legos

  • Various pieces of modular building blocks, enough to build a castle

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting place to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to build a castle.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners to inform them that in this activity you will work together to design and build a castle.
  2. Tell the Cub Scouts and adult partners that castles were built as a sign of strength.  It would not only protect the people who lived in the castle, but it also served as protection for those who lived nearby.  The walls of some castles were built to allow people to live inside the castle walls, this was usually for those who were providing skilled trades like blacksmithing, butchers, or merchants.  The farmers who supplied food to the castle lived outside of the castle walls and would seek shelter inside the walls during an attack.
  3. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners make a castle together.
  4. When everyone has made a castle have them share their model with the den.
Yesterdays Trash Is Todays Castle
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Using recycled or reused materials, build a model castle.

  • Cardboard boxes
  • Tape
  • Clean used aluminum cans
  • Clean used water bottles
  • Clean used milk jugs
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting place to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to build a castle.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners to inform them that in this activity you will work together to design and build a castle.
  2. Tell the Cub Scouts and adult partners that castles were built as a sign of strength.  It would not only protect the people who lived in the castle, but it also served as protection for those who lived nearby.  The walls of some castles were built to allow people to live inside the castle walls, this was usually for those who were providing skilled trades like blacksmithing, butchers, or merchants.  The farmers who supplied food to the castle lived outside of the castle walls and would seek shelter inside the walls during an attack.
  3. Have Cub Scouts with their adult partners make a castle together.
  4. When everyone has made a castle have them share their model with the den.
Do a Good Turn.
Knights Do A Good Turn Like Scouts Do
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

This is not a service project it is simply a good turn, a good deed for someone else.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that Knights would help others just like Scouts like to help other people at all times.  Helping others doesn’t have to be hard, it can be as simple as doing something to help your teacher, a friend, or a family member.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to share what are some things that they could do as a good turn to help someone else?
  3. Share with the Cub Scouts the story of William D. Boyce who brought Scouting to the United States from England.
    “Scouting was brought to America by William D. Boyce, a Chicago publisher, and the way Boyce discovered Scouting is one of the movement’s most colorful stories. Boyce, it seems, was in London in the fall of 1909 and was out in a famed London fog looking for an office in the center of the city. Nearly at his wit’s end, Boyce stopped a young man and asked directions. Not only did the youth tell Boyce how to reach his destination, but he also actually led Boyce there to make certain the American found his way without becoming lost again. Boyce, to show his gratitude, offered the youth a tip, but the youth would not accept it. When asked why, the young man told Boyce he was a Boy Scout and taking a tip would negate the good deed he had done and violate his Scouting code. 

    The youth’s gesture impressed Boyce, who later visited with Lord Baden-Powell himself. Boyce was so taken with Baden-Powell and the Scouting idea that back in America he and other men interested in youth development founded the Boy Scouts of America in Washington, D.C., on February 8th, 1910. No one knows who the Scout was who performed his Good Turn for Boyce, but he has not been forgotten. In Gilwell Park in London, American Scouts had a statue erected in his honor. A large-scale representation of the Silver Buffalo Award, the statue bears the inscription, “To the Unknown Scout Whose Faithfulness in the Performance of the Daily Good Turn Brought the Scout Movement to the United States of America.”

  4. Tell the Cub Scouts “You see, a good turn doesn’t have to be a big thing and it could lead to something really big.  When we do a good turn, we do it because we are helping someone else, we do not do it for a reward, for credit, or any other reason.”
  5. Have Cub Scouts think of ways they can do a good turn by helping someone else.  Have them share their ideas and commit to doing the good turn by the next den meeting.
  6. At the next den meeting ask each Cub Scout what they did as their good turn.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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