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I’ll Do It Myself – Lion

Elective Adventure

Establishing good habits of hygiene and self-reliance is the focus of this Adventure.

Requirements

Make and use a “lion bag” for personal Scouting gear.
Decorating My Lion Bag
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Decorate reusable shopping bag to make a Lion bag.

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting Location so Cub Scouts can write their name on their bags.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that part of being a good Cub Scout is taking care of your things. One way to take care of your things is to have a place to put them when you are not using them. You Cub Scout Handbook, your neckerchief, your neckerchief slide, your Cub Scout belt and Adventure belt loops can all be put away properly in a Lion bag.
  2. Have Cub Scouts write their initials on their Lion bag so they can properly identify it.
My Lion Bag
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Make a Lion bag for your Cub Scout goodies.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 42
  • Wire clothes hanger, one for each Cub Scout
  • 13” x 52” piece of yellow felt, one for each Cub Scout
  • Craft Scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • 4 oz bottle of blue fabric paint
  • 4 oz bottle of red fabric paint
  • 4 oz bottle of white fabric paint
  • 4 oz bottle of black fabric paint
  • Hot glue gun, 1 for every 2 Cub Scouts
  • 10 hot glue sticks

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with how to make a Lion bag found on page 42 of the Lion handbook.
    • Drape the felt over the hanger. Glue the felt together below the hanger to keep it from sliding off.
    • Fold the felt up on both sides. Glue the edges to form pockets.
    • On one side, add a strip of glue in the middle to form two pockets.
    • Add your handbook, neckerchief and slide, belt or other items in the pockets.
  2. Make a Lion bag to use as an example.
  3. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work together to make their bag.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that part of being a good Cub Scout is taking care of your things. One way to take care of your things is to have a place to put them when you are not using them. You Cub Scout Handbook, your neckerchief, your neckerchief slide, your Cub Scout belt and Adventure belt loops can all be put away properly in a Lion bag.
  2. Show your Lion bag as an example.
  3. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to make the Lion bag found on page 42 of the Lion handbook. Have Cub Scouts use the fabric paint to decorate and make their Lion bag their own.
  4. Only adult partners are to use the hot glue gun.
  5. Allow fabric paint to dry before using.
Construct a personal care checklist.
My Lion Morning and Evening
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Complete a morning and evening personal care routine chart.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, pages 43 and 45
  • Crayons, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that as a Cub Scout we should take care of ourselves. Tell them that there are things you can do every morning to get ready for the day and things you can do every night to get ready for bed.
  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to color the activity pages on page 43 and 45 and discuss their morning and evening routines.
The Doctor Tells Us To
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time5

Invite a medical professional or EMS to your den meeting and learn about personal care.

  • No supplies needed

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a medical professional who specializes in pediatrics to come speak to the den. Let them know that the den is Cub Scouts who are in kindergarten, and they want to learn about the things they should do to take care of themselves daily.
  2. Confirm the date, time, and location of the den meeting with the guest speaker.
  3. A day before the den meeting confirm the guest speaker.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and introduce the guest speaker.
  2. Allow the guest speaker to present to the den.
  3. Allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to ask questions. Some examples:
    • What should I be eating for breakfast?
    • How much sleep do I need at night?
    • What should I do if it is too noisy for me to think?
  4. Make adult partners aware of the daily activity charts on pages 43 and 45 of the Lion handbook. Encourage them to have their Cub Scouts color them and post them in a place they will see them each day.

After the meeting:

  1. Send a thank you note to the speaker.
Put on your shoes without help. Take them off and put them away.
Are Those My Shoes?
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Play a game where everyone takes their shoes off and mixes them in a pile to find and put on their shoes.

  • No “extra” supplies needed, just Cub Scouts and adult partners and their shoes

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with the activity. Everyone takes off their shoes and puts them in a pile. Everyone sits in a circle around the pile. On the game leader’s signal, everyone looks for their shoes to put them on. The first one to do so wins.
  2. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to play the game.

During the meeting:

  1. Before playing the game, share with the Cub Scouts that they are old enough to learn how to take care of their shoes and being able to put them on and off on their own.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts where they put their shoes when they are not wearing them.
  3. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts for a few minutes to have the Cub Scouts properly take off and put on their shoes before playing the game.
  4. Play several rounds of the “Are Those My Shoes?” game.
Shoes On or Shoes Off?
LocationIndoor
Energy 3
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Adult partners help Cub Scouts put their shoes on.

  • No “extra” supplies needed, just Cub Scouts and their shoes

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting location so adult partners can work with their Cub Scouts on putting on and taking off their shoes.

During the meeting:

  1. As everyone arrives ask that they please remove their shoes before entering the meeting location. Ask adult partners to help their Cub Scouts properly remove their shoes. If they have laces, the laces should be untied before taking them off.
  2. Have everyone place their shoes in a neat row outside the door.
  3. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners. Share with them that in many parts of Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East, shoes are never worn inside homes, and it can be seen as a sign of disrespect for guests to enter a host’s home without leaving them at the door. If you go to a friend’s house, you should ask if it is OK to keep your shoes on. For some, this is a tradition that may be based on keeping the home a sacred place. It may also be based on keeping outside dirt from entering the house.
  4. Conduct another Cub Scout Activity that can be done without shoes, such as Requirement 1 or 2 of the I’ll Do It Myself Adventure.
  5. After the meeting have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to properly put on their shoes.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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