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Lion’s Roar – Lion

Required Adventure

In partnership with the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center Foundation, Lions will learn about the “Protect Yourself Rules” and other skills needed to stay safe.

Requirements

With permission from your parent or legal guardian watch the Protect Yourself Rules video for the Lion rank.
Protect Yourself Rules Video Lion
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Watch the Protect Yourself Rules video with your parent or legal guardian.

  • Lion’s Roar 1 Parent Notification found in Additional Resources
  • Computer or smart device
  • Internet connection to view the “Protect Yourself Rules Lion” video (duration 13 minutes)
  • Or download video onto device if internet is not available where you will be watching.

Before the meeting:

  1. Inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Lion’s Roar 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1

During the meeting or at home:

  1. Parent or legal guardian watch the ”Protect Yourself Rules” video with their Cub Scout.

Lion’s Roar 1 Parent Notification

With your Lion adult partner, demonstrate Shout, Run, Tell as explained in the Protect Yourself Rules video.
Shout, Run, Tell Relay Lion
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts demonstrate their own personal way of shout, run, and tell.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 19
  • Crayons, enough to share

This activity is designed to be done after watching the Protect Yourself Rules Video in Requirement 1.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a safe area free of obstacles for Cub Scouts to run during the activity.
  2. Set up the meeting space so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners after watching the Protect Yourself Rules video.  Ask them who remembers what to do if someone makes you feel unsafe?  “Shout, Run, Tell”.
  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to color page 19 of the Lion handbook.
  3. When everyone is done inform everyone that it is now time for them to practice how to shout, run, and tell.
  4. Have the Cub Scouts line up a single file line with each youth about 10 yards away from their adult partner. When the den leader signals “Go,” the first Cub Scout in line will yell something like “No!” or “Stay away from me!” or anything else they would say if someone did something that made them feel uncomfortable.
  5.  The first Cub Scout will then run to their adult partner. When this is done, the next Cub Scout gets a turn.
  6. Repeat until all the Cub Scouts have had a chance to practice how they would Shout, Run, and Tell.
  7. During this activity, allow each Cub Scout to come up with what they want to shout.
With your Lion adult partner, demonstrate how to access emergency services.
Home Security Emergency Services
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time1

At home learn how to contact emergency services using a home alarm or voice-activated devices.

  • Home alarm system or voice-activated smart device

This activity is designed to be done at home where the Cub Scout lives.

Before the Activity

  1. Review how to contact emergency services using the home alarm system or voice-activated smart device.

During the Activity

  1. Ask the Cub Scout if they know the number to call in case of an emergency.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts when they think they should call 911.  Listen for these:
    • If there is a fire where there isn’t supposed to be one
    • They see someone unconscious (they look like they are sleeping but they won’t wake up)
    • They see someone has trouble breathing or stops breathing.
    • They see someone is choking
    • They see a crime happening
    • If they see a car accident and there are no emergency services vehicles
  3. Show them how to contact emergency services using the home alarm system or voice-activated smart device without actually contacting 911.
  4. Work with the Cub Scout to practice calling 911 by asking the questions that a 911 operator will ask.  Give the situation that the Cub Scout sees one of the adults at home grab their chest and fall to the ground.
    • Where are you? Where is the scene? The location of the emergency, including the street address.
    • Who’s involved? Is anyone hurt? Name(s) and/or physical description(s) of people involved.
    • When did it happen? Is it going on right now?
Practice 911 and Five Trusted Adults
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Practice dialing 911.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 20
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Pencils, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting space so Cub Scouts and adult partners can work on the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that when they are in trouble or if they see someone else in trouble it is important to call emergency services.  Ask the Cub Scouts if they know the number to call in case of an emergency.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts when they think they should call 911.  Listen for these:
    • If there is a fire where there isn’t supposed to be one.
    • They see someone unconscious (they look like they are sleeping but they won’t wake up).
    • They see someone has trouble breathing or stops breathing.
    • They see someone is choking.
    • They see a crime happening.
    • If they see a car accident and there are no emergency services vehicles.
  3. Tell Cub Scouts that since we don’t want to call 911 unless there is an emergency we can practice using the activity on page 20 of their Lion handbook.
  4. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to practice calling 911 by pushing the numbers on the activity on page 20.  adult partners will ask the questions that a 911 operator will ask.  Give the situation that the Cub Scout sees one of the adults in the den meeting grab their chest and fall to the ground.
    • Where are you? Where is the scene? The location of the emergency, including the street address.
    • Who’s involved? Is anyone hurt? Name(s) and/or physical description(s) of people involved.
    • When did it happen? Is it going on right now? Time.
  5. When everyone has time to practice 911 have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to come up with a list of five trusted adults.  Share with the den that young people should have at least five adults they have identified with their parent(s) or legal guardians with whom they can talk freely about their feelings and problems and who provide healthy attention and affection. A child who has such a network of trusted adults will be more difficult for an adult who abuses children to groom. The list of five adults might change depending on the child’s circumstances.
  6. Have everyone list the five trusted adults on page 20 of the Lion handbook.
With your Lion adult partner, demonstrate how to safely cross a street or walk in a parking lot.
Green Means Go Red Means Stop
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Play a game of red light, green light to reinforce how to safely cross a street.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, page 21
  • Crayons, red and green enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a safe area free of obstacles for Cub Scouts and adult partners to play red light, green light.
  2. Become familiar with how to play red light, green light.
  3. Start with Cub Scouts and adult partners along the starting line the game leader stands at the finish line about 25 yards away. When the game leader says ‘Green Light’ everyone will move towards the finish line. When the game leader says ‘Red Light’ everyone must immediately stop. If Cub Scouts or adult partners are still moving when you call ‘Red Light’, they must go back to the starting line. Start a new round when the first person crosses the finish line, they then get to be the game leader.
  4. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that it is important to always pay attention when we are walking across a street or when we are walking in a parking lot.  You should always look all around you and pay attention to every car you can see.  Just because you can see the car doesn’t mean they can or do see you.
  2. When we cross the street, we want to use a crosswalk and pay attention to when we can walk.
  3. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partner to complete the activity on page 21 of the Lion handbook.
  4. When they are done, gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners to play a game of red light, green light.
  5. Play red light, green light.
Make Believe Parking Lot
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List3
Prep Time4

Set up a mock crosswalk and parking lot for Cub Scouts to learn about staying safe in these situations.

  • Sidewalk Chalk
  • 6 bicycles
  • Bike helmets for the 6 bicycles
  • 2 – 13” x 13” pieces of cardboard
  • Red acrylic paint
  • Green acrylic paint
  • 1” paint brush
  • Container of water to clean paint brush

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a flat concrete or blacktop area such as a basketball court or large driveway that is safe and free of obstacles.
  2. Designate two areas, one will be an intersection with a crosswalk the other will be a mock parking lot.
  3. Using the sidewalk chalk draw a road intersection with a designated crosswalk.
  4. Using the sidewalk chalk draw a parking lot with six car spaces on each side.
  5. Contact Cub Scouts and adult partners in the den and secure at least six bicycles and make sure to have bike helmets.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that it is important to always pay attention when we are walking across a street or when we are walking in a parking lot.  You should always look all around you and pay attention to every car you can see.  Just because you can see the car doesn’t mean they can or do see you.
  2. Bring everyone over to the mock crosswalk and inform the den that when we cross the street, we want to use a crosswalk and pay attention to when we can walk.  Have someone serve as the crossing sign and stand at one end of the crosswalk.  Have Cub Scouts and adult partners on the other end and each take a turn crossing the street.  Remind Cub Scouts that even when the crossing signal says to walk, they should still look both ways before crossing.
  3. Next bring everyone over to the mock parking lot.  Have some Cub Scouts and/or adult partners park their bikes in the parking spaces.  They will act as cars moving in and around parking spaces as the other Cub Scouts and adult partners walk down the aisle.  Cub Scouts should hold hands with their adult partner when in a parking lot and always look at the “cars”.  When walking they should stay on one side of the aisle and not walk down the center.  Give everyone a chance to demonstrate holding hands, staying out of the middle of the aisle, and watching for cars.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure:

  • Review the  BSA Youth Protection content.
  • Review the Protect Yourself Rules-Lion video.
  • This Adventure may be completed at home or as a den.  Prior to the meeting inform parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the Adventure and content.  See the document “Lion’s Roar 1 Parent Notification” found in the Additional Resources section for Requirement 1.

During the Adventure:

  • There is a chance that a child may disclose a situation that causes suspicion of abuse.  If you suspect a child is being abused follow the reporting guidelines found on the BSA Youth Protection site.

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