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Outdoor Adventurer 

Required Adventure

There’s nothing like the great outdoors. In this Adventure, you will plan and participate in a campout with your Arrow of Light patrol or a Scouts BSA troop. You’ll learn how to pack, help plan using the BSA SAFE Checklist, set up camp, and discover how Scouts camp.

Requirements

Learn about the Scout Basic Essentials.
Scout Basic Essentials
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts learn the Scout Basic Essentials.

  •  Pocketknife
  • Rain Gear
  • Trail Food
  • Flashlight
  • Extra clothing
  • First-aid kit
  • Sun protection
  • Map and compass
  • Matches and fire starters
  • Water bottle
  • Backpack

Before the meeting;

  1. Gather examples of each of the Scout Basic Essentials.
  2. Become familiar with the Scout Basic Essentials.
    • Pocketknife. A pocketknife or multitool could be the most useful tool you can own. Keep yours clean, sharp, and secure, and don’t pick one so heavy that it pulls your pants down. In order to carry a pocketknife as an Arrow of Light Scout, you must first earn the Knife Safety Adventure, even if you earned the Whittling Adventure as a Bear Cub Scout and/or the Chef’s Knife Adventure as a Webelos.
    • Rain Gear. A poncho or a rain parka can protect you from light showers and heavy storms. It can also block the wind and help keep you warm.
    • Trail Food. A small bag of granola, some raisins and nuts, or a couple of energy bars can give you a boost when you get hungry on the trail. High energy foods are especially important if you are out longer than you had expected.
    • Flashlight. An LED flashlight will cast a strong beam with just one or two AA batteries. LED headlamps are a good option, too, because they leave your hands free. Carry spare batteries in case you need them.
    • Extra Clothing. Layers of clothing allow you to adjust what you wear to match the weather. During an afternoon hike, a jacket might provide all the extra warmth you need. On camping trips, bring along additional clothing to deal with changes in temperature.
    • First-Aid Kit. Your patrol leader or a Scouts BSA troop leader will bring a group first-aid kit on most
    • Scout trips, but you should also carry a few personal supplies to treat blisters, small cuts, and other minor injuries.
    • Sun Protection. Guard your skin by applying a good sunscreen (SPF 30 or greater) and wear a broad-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and lip balm that contains sunscreen ingredients. Apply sunscreen 20 minutes before you hit the trail and every two hours after that — more often if you sweat a lot.
    • Map and Compass. A map and a compass can show you the way in unfamiliar areas. Learn the basics, and then practice using a compass and a map when you’re in the field.
    • Matches and Fire Starters. With strike-anywhere matches, a butane lighter, or a ferro rod and striker, you can light a stove or kindle a fire in any weather. Protect matches and other fire starters from moisture by storing them in a self-sealing plastic bag or canister. Before you can use matches or fire starters you must first earn the Firem’n Chit. You may want to ask for help from your local Scouts BSA Troop. If you earn this certification as an Arrow of Light Scout, you will be required to earn it again in Scouts BSA before you are permitted to use matches or fire starters in Scouts BSA.
    • Water Bottle. Always take along at least a 1-quart bottle filled with water. On long hikes, on hot days, in arid regions, and at high elevations, carry two bottles or more.
  3. Place items in a backpack.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to recite the Scouts BSA motto. When they say, “Be Prepared” respond that the Scouts BSA Essentials help them be prepared in the outdoors. Today they will  learn about the Scout Basic Essentials.
  2. Bring out the backpack. Pull each item from the backpack and pass it around to the Cub Scouts. Ask questions for Cub Scouts to answer about each item. For example:
    • Why is this item important?
    • is this item also one of the Cub Scout Six Essentials?
    • How  is the item used?
  3. Remind Cub Scouts that they must first earn the Knife Safety Adventure before using a pocketknife. Once the join a Scouts BSA troop, they will need to earn the Totin’ Chip.
  4. Share with Cub Scouts that to carry and use matches and fire starters, they must earn the Firem’n Chit after they joint a Scouts BSA troop.
Scout Basic Essentials Backpack
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts play a relay game to learn about the Scout Basic Essentials.

  • Adults
  • Scout Basic Essentials found in Additional Resources

The Scout Basic Essentials, two of each

  • 3” x 5” index card with the word “pocketknife” written on it
  • Rain gear
  • Trail food
  • Flashlight
  • Extra clothing
  • First aid Kit
  • Sun protection
  • Compass and/or map
  • Fire starter and/or matches
  • Water bottle

Other Outdoor Items that are not part of the Scout Basic Essentials, two of each

  • Whistle
  • Hiking boots
  • Toothbrush
  • Bug net
  • Camp chair
  • Tent

Before the meeting:

  1. Gather supplies.
  2. Become familiar with the Scout Basic Essentials.
    • Pocketknife. A pocketknife or multitool could be the most useful tool you can own. Keep yours clean, sharp, and secure, and don’t pick one so heavy that it pulls your pants down. In order to carry a pocketknife as an Arrow of Light Scout, you must first earn the Knife Safety Adventure, even if you earned the Whittling Adventure as a Bear Cub Scout and/or the Chef’s Knife Adventure as a Webelos.
    • Rain Gear. A poncho or a rain parka can protect you from light showers and heavy storms. It can also block the wind and help keep you warm.
    • Trail Food. A small bag of granola, some raisins and nuts, or a couple of energy bars can give you a boost when you get hungry on the trail. High energy foods are especially important if you are out longer than you had expected.
    • Flashlight. An LED flashlight will cast a strong beam with just one or two AA batteries. LED headlamps are a good option, too, because they leave your hands free. Carry spare batteries in case you need them.
    • Extra Clothing. Layers of clothing allow you to adjust what you wear to match the weather. During an afternoon hike, a jacket might provide all the extra warmth you need. On camping trips, bring along additional clothing to deal with changes in temperature.
    • First-Aid Kit. Your patrol leader or a Scouts BSA troop leader will bring a group first-aid kit on most Scout trips, but you should also carry a few personal supplies to treat blisters, small cuts, and other minor injuries.
    • Sun Protection. Guard your skin by applying a good sunscreen (SPF 30 or greater) and wear a broad-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and lip balm that contains sunscreen ingredients. Apply sunscreen 20 minutes before you hit the trail and every two hours after that — more often if you sweat a lot.
    • Map and Compass. A map and a compass can show you the way in unfamiliar areas. Learn the basics, and then practice using a compass and a map when you’re in the field.
    • Matches and Fire Starters. With strike-anywhere matches, a butane lighter, or a ferro rod and striker, you can light a stove or kindle a fire in any weather. Protect matches and other fire starters from moisture by storing them in a self-sealing plastic bag or canister. Before you can use matches or fire starters you must first earn the Firem’n Chit. You may want to ask for help from your local Scouts BSA Troop. If you earn this certification as an Arrow of Light Scout, you will be required to earn it again in Scouts BSA before you are permitted to use matches or fire starters in Scouts BSA.
    • Water Bottle. Always take along at least a 1-quart bottle filled with water. On long hikes, on hot days, in arid regions, and at high elevations, carry two bottles or more.
  3. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to conduct the relay.
  4. Place the supplies listed above into two separate piles at one end of the room. Each pile contains a single item from the supply list, this is a mix of items that are part of the Scout Basic Essentials and items that are not. Do not put a pocketknife in either pile, replace the pocketknife with the 3” x 5” index card that says “pocketknife”.  Since this is a relay race, you do not want to have anyone running with a knife.
  5. Identify two adults to help, one for each team. Provide the Scout Basic Essentials list found in Additional Resources either by printing or online access.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to line up into two separate lines.
  2. Assign an adult to each team.
  3. Explain they will be doing a relay to find the Scout Basic Essentials. They are to run to the pile, select an item that is one of the essentials and return to their team.
  4. The adult will check to see if the item is one the list. If it is, next Cub Scout runs to the pile.
  5. If the item is not on the list, the Cub Scout returns the item to the pile and makes another choice.
  6. This continues until one team has all ten items.

Scout Basic Essentials

Scouts BSA Visitor
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts learn the Scout Basic Essentials from a Scouts BSA member.

  • Pocketknife
  • Rain Gear
  • Trail Food
  • Flashlight
  • Extra clothing
  • First-aid kit
  • Sun protection
  • Map and compass
  • Matches and fire starters
  • Water bottle
  • Backpack

Before the meeting:

  1. Invite a local Scouts BSA member to the next meeting. Tell them they will be discussing the Scout Basic Essentials, and they should bring their own pack to the meeting with the Scout Basic Essentials. Let them know that they will be teaching fifth graders about the essentials.
  2. The day before the meeting, contact the Scouts BSA member to confirm the meeting location, date, and time.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain to Cub Scouts that they will be learning about the Scout Basic Essentials from a Scout BSA member.
  2. Introduce the Scouts BSA member.
  3. Ask the Scouts BSA member to pull each item from the backpack and pass it around to the Cub Scouts. Have Cub Scouts questions for each item. For example:
    • Why is this item important?
    • is this item also one of the Cub Scout Six Essentials?
    • How  is the item used?
  4. Remind Cub Scouts that they must first earn the Knife Safety Adventure before using a pocketknife. Once the join a Scouts BSA troop, they will need to earn the Totin’ Chip.
  5. Share with Cub Scouts that to carry and use matches and fire starters, they must earn the Firem’n Chit after they joint a Scouts BSA troop.

After the meeting:

  1. Send a thank you card to the Scout BSA member.
Determine what you will bring on an overnight campout — including a tent and sleeping bag/gear — and how you will carry your gear.
IOLS Shakedown
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts have a camping gear shakedown with an IOLS (Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills) trained leader.

  • Camping Gear Checklist found in Additional Resources or the Arrow of Light handbook
  • Pencil, one for each Cub Scout
  • Each Arrow of Light Scout will need to bring what they would bring on a weekend camping trip including:
    • Scout Basic Essentials
    • Backpack
    • Sleeping Gear
    • Eating Kit
    • Cleanup Kit
    • Optional Personal Items

Before the meeting:

  1. Find a registered adult leader in a Scouts BSA Troop who is trained in Individual Outdoor Leadership Skills (IOLS), this is a required training for any Assistant Scoutmaster or Scoutmaster.
  2. Ask if they would be willing to go over camping gear for an upcoming camping trip with the Arrow of Light Scouts.
  3. Notify parents and legal guardians of the location, date, and time of the shakedown.
  4. The day before confirm with the IOLS-trained Scouts BSA leader.
  5. Send a reminder to parents and legal guardians to have their Cub Scout bring their camping gear to the meeting.

During the meeting:

  1. Introduce the  registered adult leader from the Scouts BSA Troop to the Cub Scouts. Allow Cub Scouts to introduce themselves.
  2. Have each Cub Scout present their gear and explain why they packed it. Each Cub Scout should write down any items that they missed.
  3. Cub Scouts should use the Camping Gear Checklist to keep track of anything that should be added and things that can be removed.

After the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts their thoughts. Did they have everything for the campout? How was the shakedown helpful?
  2. Send a thank you card to the IOLS trained leader.

Camping Gear Checklist

Troop Shakedown
LocationTravel
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts attend a Scout BSA troop meeting for a camping gear shakedown

  • Camping Gear Checklist found in Additional Resources or the Arrow of Light handbook
  • Pencil, one for each Cub Scout
  • Each Arrow of Light Scout will need to bring what they would bring on a weekend camping trip including:
    • Scout Basic Essentials
    • Backpack
    • Sleeping Gear
    • Eating Kit
    • Cleanup Kit
    • Optional Personal Items
  • Activity Consent Form

Before the meeting:

  1. Find a local troop that would be willing to go over camping gear for an upcoming camping trip with the Arrow of Light patrol.
  2. Notify parents and legal guardians of the location, date, and time of the  meeting.
  3. The day before confirm with the troop.
  4. Send a reminder to parents and legal guardians to have their  Arrow of Light Scout must have their camping gear ready to go and bring a completed Activity Consent form.
  5.  Remind Arrow of Light Scouts and parents of the Camping Gear Checklist on page 71 of the Arrow of Light Handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Meet the Cub Scouts at the troop meeting location. Introduce yourself to the Scoutmaster and the Senior Patrol leader. Allow Cub Scouts to introduce themselves.
  2. Have Scouts BSA troop members review  each Cub Scout’s camping gear and provide an explanation why each item is important to have. Encourage Cub Scouts to ask questions.
  3. Cub Scouts should use the Camping Gear Checklist to keep track of anything that should be added and things that can be removed.

After the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts their thoughts. Did they have everything for the campout? How were the members of the troop helpful?

Camping Gear Checklist

Review the four points of the BSA SAFE Checklist and how you will apply them. on the campout.
BSA SAFE Checklist
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time2

Cub Scouts apply the points of the BSA SAFE checklist to their campout.

  1. Download and print a copy of the BSA Safe Checklist for each Cub Scout.
  2. Set up meeting space for Cub Scouts to be able to write down their thoughts on the checklist.

During the meeting:

  1. Lead a discussion with Cub Scouts and go over the points of the BSA Safe Checklist and each point pertains to the upcoming  campout trip.
  2. Supervision Youth are supervised by qualified and trustworthy adults who set the example for safety. Possible questions:
    • Who  are the registered adult leaders supervising the camping trip?
    • Is at least one of the adults BALOO trained?
  3. Assessment Activities are assessed for risks during planning. Leaders have reviewed applicable program guidance or standards and have verified the activity is not prohibited. Risk avoidance or mitigation is incorporated into the activity.
    • What activities will take place during the camping trip?
    • What type of safety gear is needed?
    • Have we reviewed the Guide to Safe Scouting to check on requirements for camping, tenting, and activities?
  4. Fitness and Skill Participants’ Annual Health and Medical Records are reviewed, and leaders have confirmed that prerequisite fitness and skill levels exist for participants to take part safely.
    • Does everyone have completed a BSA Annual Health and Medical Record handed in?
  5. Equipment and Environment Safe and appropriately sized equipment, courses, camps, campsites, trails, or playing fields are used properly. Leaders periodically check gear use and the environment for changing conditions that could affect safety.
    • Has everyone done a camping gear shakedown?
    • What will the weather be like and what adjustments need to be made?
Locate the campsite where you will be camping on a map.
Digital Map
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts locate their campground using a digital device.

  • Computer or smart device with map app, one for every two Cub Scouts

Before the meeting:

  1. Determine the location for your outdoor camping activity, including campsite numbers.
  2. Remind parents or legal guardians to bring an electronic device to den meeting.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask Cub Scouts to bring up a map application on their computer or smart device.
  2. Ask them to  find the campground location on their map. How long will it take to get there?
  3. Tell Cub Scouts to locate their campsite on the campground map.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts to locate a bathroom and other park buildings on the map.
Paper Map
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts locate their campsite on a paper map.

  • Map of the campground you will be camping at
  • Pencils

Before the meeting:

  1. Determine the location for your outdoor camping activity, including  campsite number or name.
  2. Print the campground map, one for each Cub Scout.
  3. Set up meeting space so Cub Scouts have a place to write.

During the meeting:

  1. Hand out a map and a pencil to each Cub Scout.
  2. Tell Cub Scouts that they will be locating their campsite on the map.
  3. Ask them to  circle the campsite. Ask Cub Scouts to locate a bathroom and other important buildings on the map. Have them put a square around these locations.
With your patrol or a Scouts BSA troop, participate in a campout.
Den Campout
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts camp with their den.

  • Campground reservations
  • Individual Campout Checklist for Pack Overnighter
  • Scout Basic Essentials
  • BALOO trained adult leader
  • BSA Health and Medical Record for every Cub Scout
  • Activity Consent Form
  • Each Arrow of Light Scout will need to bring what they would bring on a weekend camping trip including:
    • Scout Basic Essentials
    • Backpack
    • Sleeping gear
    • Eating kit
    • Cleanup kit
    • Optional personal items
  • Group camping gear (Page 364 of the Arrow of Light Handbook)
    • Patrol first aid kit
    • Tents, ground cloths, and stake (if providing)
    • Dinning fly and stakes
    • 50 ft nylon cord
    • Cook kit
    • Cleanup kit
    • Repair kit
    • Group extras
    • Other gear specific for this campout

Before the campout:

  1. If you have not done so already complete requirement 2.
  2. With your den, locate a campground that is suitable for Cub Scouts and make a reservation. Under the direction of the BALOO-trained leader develop a schedule for the campout including activities, Adventure requirements, and meals.
  3. Determine what items you will need to take.
  4. Distribute information to your den about time, date, location, and packing list.
  5. Identify which parents or legal guardians are attending with their Cub Scout.
    • How should we get our campsite ready for our tent?
    • How do we Leave No Trace when we pack up?

During the meeting:

  1. Go on an overnight campout with your den.

Tip: Complete Requirements 5, 6 and 7 at the same time.  Consider working on an Adventure such as Knife Safety, Fishing, Estimations, High Tech Outdoors, Into the Wild, or Into the Woods.

Troop Campout
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts camp with a Scouts BSA troop.

  • Campground reservations
  • Individual Campout Checklist for Pack Overnighter
  • Scout Basic Essentials
  • BALOO trained adult leader
  • BSA Health and Medical Record for every Cub Scout
  • Activity Consent Form
  • Each Arrow of Light Scout will need to bring what they would bring on a weekend camping trip including:
    • Scout Basic Essentials
    • Backpack
    • Sleeping gear
    • Eating kit
    • Cleanup kit
    • Optional personal items
  • Group camping gear (Page 364 of the Arrow of Light Handbook)
    • Patrol first aid kit
    • Tents, ground cloths, and stake (if providing)
    • Dinning fly and stakes
    • 50 ft nylon cord
    • Cook kit
    • Cleanup kit
    • Repair kit
    • Group extras
    • Other gear specific for this campout

Before the campout:

  1. If you have not done so already complete requirement 2.
  2. Contact a local Scouts BSA troop and inquire about holding a campout with the Arrow of Light Patrol and the troop.
  3. Under the direction of the BALOO-trained leader develop a schedule for the campout including activities, Adventure requirements, and meals.
  4. Coordinate with the Scouts BSA troop activities  that can be done together with the Arrow of Light patrol
  5. Determine what items you will need to take.
  6. Distribute information to your den about time, date, location, and packing list.
  7. Identify which parents or legal guardians are attending with their Cub Scout.
    • How should we get our campsite ready for our tent?
    • How do we Leave No Trace when we pack up?

During the meeting:

  1. Go on an overnight campout with the Scouts BSA troop.

Tip: Complete Requirements 5, 6 and 7 at the same time.  Consider working on an Adventure such as Knife Safety, Fishing, Estimations, High Tech Outdoors, Into the Wild, or Into the Woods.

Campout Planner

Upon arrival at the campout determine where to set up your campsite: kitchen, eating area, tents, and firepit. Help the patrol set up the patrol gear before setting up your own tent.
Campsite Setup
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts set up their campsite.

Before the campout:

  1. Become familiar with how to properly set up a campsite.
    • A good campsite is more than a convenient place to sleep and eat. Its setting offers you safety and comfort and takes advantage of features like great views and natural windbreaks. Keep the following information in mind as you decide where to spend the night.
    • ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The principles of outdoor ethics will help guide you as you select a campsite. Use established campsites whenever you can, or camp on durable surfaces — that is, surfaces that won’t be harmed by tents and footsteps. Good campsites are found, not made. If you must move a log, a few rocks, or anything else as you pitch your tents, return everything to its original location before you leave.
    • SAFETY  Pitch tents away from dead trees or trees with limbs that might fall in a storm. Stay out of ditches or depressions in the ground that could fill during a flash flood and other areas that could fill with water. (If you see debris caught in underbrush or if all the grass is bent over in the same direction, choose another site.) Avoid lone trees, the tops of hills and mountains, high ridges, and other targets of lightning. Camp away from hiking and game trails, especially in bear country. (Look for animal tracks and worn pathways that are too low or narrow for humans.)
    • SIZE   A campsite must be large enough for your Arrow of Light patrol to set up its tents and cook its meals in separate areas. Also, make sure there is enough space to move around without tripping over tent stakes and tent guylines.
    • COMFORT    In the summer, look for a shady site where breezes can help cool your tent and chase away mosquitoes. In the winter, find a site where trees and hillsides provide a natural windbreak. Regardless of the time of year, place your tent on the flattest spot possible. (If the ground slants a bit, sleep with your head uphill and the opening downhill.) Consider the sun as well; the morning sun will
    • help dry out your tent, while evening sun can be uncomfortably hot in the summer.
    • WATER   Each Scout in your patrol will need several gallons of water every day for drinking, cooking, and cleanup. Treat water you take from streams, rivers, lakes, and springs. In dry regions, you might need to carry all your water to camp. That information will be important when you put together the trip plan.
    • STOVES AND CAMPFIRES   Where fires are not allowed, where wood is scarce, or when you want to prepare your meals quickly, plan on using a camp stove to heat water and cook food. As part of Scouting’s commitment to preserving the outdoors, stoves are the preferred method for cooking. Where fires are permitted, appropriate, and desired, look for a campsite with an existing fire ring. Only use wood that is dead, on the ground, and no larger around than your wrist. Never cut live trees. For more information on using stoves and campfires, see the Unit Fireguard Plan Chart, No. 33691.
    • PRIVACY   A Scout is courteous. Show respect by selecting campsites away from other campers. Trees, bushes, and the shape of the land can screen your camp from trails and neighboring campsites. Keep noise down so you won’t disturb nearby campers, and respect quiet hours at public campgrounds and Scout camps.
    • PERMISSION    Well ahead of the date of a camping trip, contact rangers or other managers of public parks and forests to let them know you’re coming. They can issue the permits you need and suggest how you can fully enjoy your campout. Get permission from owners or managers of private property, too, before camping on their land.

At the campsite:

  1. Walk around with Cub Scouts to assess the campsite. As you walk around point out possible locations for:
    • Tent- a place that is flat, rock and sticks free, away from low hanging branches
    • Kitchen and Eating Area- a place that is covered, has access to a table, flat, close to a water source for clean up
    • Fire Pit- most campsites will have a predetermined fire pit. Locate this and make sure tents are a safe distance away
  2. Ask Cub Scouts to turn to the appropriate page on setting up a campsite.
  3. Have them go through the Requirement 6 information as a checklist to decide where they want to place their tent, kitchen and eating area.
  4. After Cub Scouts determine the best location, they are to set up the kitchen and eating area, before setting up their own tent.
Explain how to keep food safe and the kitchen area sanitary at the campsite. Demonstrate your knowledge during the campout.
Safe Food Handling And Clean Up
LocationTravel
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time5

Cub Scouts learn about safe food handling and use the three-pot method for meal clean up. method for cleaning

  • Ice chest, filled with ice
  • Large plastic box with lid
  • Antibacterial wipes
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Cutting board
  • A dishwashing spot that’s at least 200 feet from any sources of water
  • Hot water at least 160 degrees (Pro tip: start heating your wash water before you sit down to eat)
  • Three plastic tubs
  • Biodegradable dish soap
  • A dish brush/scrubber or two
  • Hot tongs for dipping plates and spoons into the hot rinse
  • Bleach or sanitizing tablets
  • Ground cloth, towel, mesh bag or lightweight hammock for air-drying

Before the campout:

  1. Read the Aaron on Scouting blog “The three-pot method: This is how to wash dishes at a campsite.”
  2. Gather the required gear and materials.
  3. Make sure that the campsite has water nearby.

Before the meal:

  1. Gather the Arrow of Light Scouts and share with them that before anyone starts using the camp kitchen, we want to keep things clean and safe.
  2. Have Cub Scouts wash their hands and then use hand sanitizer before touching food.
  3. Ask Cub Scouts what items need to stay cold and put in the ice chest.
    • Meat
    • Cheese and Dairy
    • Eggs
    • Fruits and vegetables if the outside temperature is above 60 degrees
  4. Review with Cub Scouts that the ice chest needs to remain closed and is only opened to get an item or put an item back.  Leaving the ice chest open dramatically changes the temperature.  Inform them that the ice will melt and that items in the ice chest should be in waterproof containers like a zip lock bag.
  5. Show the Arrow of Light Scouts the cutting board.  Inform them that when you cut raw meat on a cutting board you are not to use it again until it is cleaned and sterilized.  This prevents what is called cross-contamination where bacteria from raw meat gets onto food that is going to be eaten. This also goes for knives.  A knife that is used to cut raw meat is not to be used again until it has been cleaned and sterilized.  When in doubt, clean it.
  6. Cover other conditions for food safety based on the weather.

After the meal:

  1. Prepare the three-pot cleaning method by:
    • The first bin contains hot, soapy water.
    • The second is filled with clean, hot rinse water.
    • The third bin contains cold water with a sanitizer such as bleach to kill bacteria.
  2. Each bucket needs to have tongs.
  3. Follow these steps to wash a pot:
    • Scrape excess food into a garbage bag so the pot is as clean as possible.
    • Dampen a scrub pad with water from the wash pot and scrub the pot to loosen the remaining food.
    • Dunk the pot in the wash pot to remove the loosened food. If food is still stuck to the pot, scrub some more.
    • Use hot-pot tongs to dip the pot in the hot-rinse pot. Be sure no soap bubbles remain on the pan.
    • Dunk the pot in the cold-rinse pot. If the pot is too big, dip some water from the cold-rinse pot into the pot and slosh it around.
  4. Ask other members to clean their mess kits using the three-pot method.
  5. Cub Scouts will dispose of the dirty wash water either in a designated area such as a drain or by dispersing 200 feet away from camp and water sources.
  6. Have Cub Scouts put away clean dishes, utensils and cooking gear.
After your campout, discuss with your patrol what went well and what you would do differently next time. Include how you followed the Outdoor Code and Leave Not Trace Principles for Kids.
Start, Stop, Continue
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts assess their campout using Start, Stop, Continue.

  • Paper and pencil

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts gather around a table or in a circle. Ask one Cub Scout to be the scribe.
  2. Explain the purpose of Start, Stop, Continue is to identify the things you should start doing, things you should stop doing, and things you should continue to do.
  3. Have each Cub Scout name one item to start, one to stop, and one to continue. Possible topics include:
    • Activities or Adventures
    • Food
    • Preparations
    • Location
    • Behavior
    • Outdoor Code
    • Leave No Trace Principles for Kids
  4. Ask the scribe to read aloud the things to start, things to stop, and things to continue. Make sure that everyone feels the list is complete.  Use the list for the next outing or campout.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before starting this Adventure, review Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activities.

Review Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities before camping.

When camping:

  • BALOO training is mandatory for a MINIMUM OF ONE adult on a pack or and Arrow of Light den campout .  BALOO training consists of an online pre-requisite component in addition to an overnight hand on practical. BSA’s Cub Scout level camping policies will be taught along with the discovery of the necessary tools to help units carry out a successful camping experience.
  • Complete the on-line training “Hazardous Weather” training module that is part of the Position Specific Training for den leaders my.scouting.  If you have already completed den leader, Cubmaster, or pack committee chair training on-line, then you have completed this module.
  • Watch the Weather Related Safety Moment video (1 minute 48 seconds).
  • Review Guide to Safe Scouting for camping,
  • If building a campfire, review Behavior Around Campfires.

When camping with a Scouts BSA troop, Arrow of Light scouts abide by Arrow of Light Cub Scout camping rules.

Before starting this Adventure:

  • Review the Food Allergies safety moment.
  • Review each Cub Scouts BSA Annual Health and Medical Record for any food allergies or restrictions.
  • Ask if any member of the den, youth, or adult, has any religious, or cultural dietary concerns.
  • If there is someone in the den, youth, or adults, who carries an EpiPen due to severe allergies make sure that at least one other adult knows how to administer the EpiPen. To learn more, review this Safety Moment on anaphylaxis.
  • Review the Keep Your Food Safe guide to properly keep, store, and prepare food.

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