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Ready, Set, Grow – Lion

Elective Adventure

Gardening for fun and for food is how Lions will discover some of the wonders of natural science.

Requirements

Discover where the food we eat comes from.
Ground, Tree, Vine, Farm
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Activity that matches the food and where it comes from the ground, a tree, a vine, or a farm.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, pages 60 and 61
  • Craft scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Glue sticks, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Review pages 60 and 61 of the Lion handbook and become familiar with where each of the foods comes from.
    • Ground – potato, carrot, lettuce
    • Vine – grapes, tomato, beans
    • Farm – cheese, milk, eggs
    • Tree – apple, pear, orange
  2. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that natural foods come from natural places such as plants or animals.  Trees and vines produce fruits that start off as flowers and then form into an edible fruit that contains seeds.  When animals eat fruit, they eat the seeds too and when they poop, they help spread the seeds.  In the ground there are vegetables that are plants or roots that we can eat, vegetables don’t have seeds.  On a farm animals can become sources of protein.
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to color, cut, and then paste the foods on page 61 onto the proper place they come from on page 60.
  3. Have Cub Scouts share their activity when done.
Supermarket Fun
LocationTravel
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Visit a supermarket and arrange a tour of each department to learn where food for that department comes from.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a local supermarket/grocery store that has produce, meat, dairy, and bakery departments.  Contact the store and arrange a tour.  Inform the store manager of the size of the den and that they are kindergarten-aged youth with their adult partners who are learning about where food comes from.  You would like to have a tour of each department, produce, meat, dairy, and bakery, and have someone describe where the food in that department comes from.
  2. Confirm a date and time for the visit and who your contact for the store will be.
  3. Inform Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the visit.  Designate a location where the den will gather before entering the store.
  4. Prior to the visit make sure parents or legal guardians complete the Activity Consent Form.

During the meeting:

  1. Meet the Cub Scouts and adult partners in the designated gathering area.  Remind Cub Scouts that part of the Scout Law is to be friendly, courteous, and kind and to keep that in mind during their visit.
  2. Meet with the contact with the store and go on the tour.
  3. Make sure that each department shares all the different locations that they get their products from and share with the den which locations are considered local.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they liked about the visit and to say one thing that they learned from the visit.

After the meeting:

  1. Send a thank you note to the store contact.
Where Does That Food Come From
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts identify where different food comes from in this relay race.

  • Cub Scouts will need their Lion handbook, pages 60 and 61
  • Craft scissors, one for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons, enough to share
  • Glue sticks, one for each Cub Scout
  • Toy/plastic foods
    • Apple
    • Pear
    • Grapes
    • Chicken drumstick
    • Steak
    • Eggs
    • Milk carton
    • Potato
    • Tomato
    • Lemon
    • Cheese
    • Head of lettuce
  • 4 –  5 gal. baskets
  • 4 – 3” x 5” index cards
  • 1 – black magic marker
  • 1 – grocery bag to fit all the plastic food in
  • Stopwatch

Before the meeting:

  1. Review pages 60 and 61 of the Lion handbook and become familiar with where each of the foods comes from.
    • Ground – potato, carrot, lettuce
    • Vine – grapes, tomato, beans
    • Farm – cheese, milk, eggs
    • Tree – apple, pear, orange
  2. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.
  3. Identify a safe area free of obstacles to conduct a relay race with a starting line and about 30 feet away place the 4 baskets.
  4. Using the 3” x 5” index cards and marker label one basket GROUND – another VINE – another FARM – and the last one TREE.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that natural foods come from natural places such as plants or animals.  Trees and vines produce fruits that start off as flowers and then form into an edible fruit that contains seeds.  When animals eat fruit, they eat the seeds too and when they poop, they help spread the seeds.  In the ground there are vegetables that are plants or roots that we can eat, vegetables don’t have seeds.  On a farm animals can become sources of protein.
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to color, cut, and then paste the foods on page 61 onto the proper place they come from on page 60.
  3. When everyone is done line the Cub Scouts up for the relay race.
  4. Explain the rules of the race. The first Cub Scout in line will pick a plastic item food from the grocery bag and run to the proper basket where that food is grown and then run back. If they place the food in the right basket the next Cub Scout goes, if they do not get it correct, they must run back, pick the food out of the basket, run back to the line, and then run back and attempt to put it in the right basket.  You will have time to see how long it takes the den to run the race and then they will run it again to see if they can get a better time.
  5. After the race, Cub Scouts share one thing they learned from where food comes from.
Plant a small garden outside or in a container.
Alright, Alright, Alright, It’s Avocado Time
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Plant an avocado seed.

  • 16 oz. mason jars, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Large avocados, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 4 toothpicks, a set of four for each Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with how to grow an avocado from the seed.  Watch this YouTube video, “How to Grow an Avocado from Seed” for more information.
  2. Prepare the meeting space to allow Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity together.
  3. Prepare the avocado seeds by cutting the avocado in half and removing the seed (pit) from the middle.  Wipe off the seed.
  4. Plant an avocado seed as an example.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that they are going grow an avocado plant from a very large seed.  Show them the avocado seed that you planted in the mason jar.
  2. Have Cub Scouts and adult partners work together to first peel the avocado seed.
  3. Next have them use the toothpicks to place them in the seeds and suspend the seed over the mason jar.
  4. Next fill the mason jar with water so it covers half the seed.
  5. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners that when the water runs low to replace the water completely not just top it off and that the plant likes full sun.

After the meeting:

  1. Each meeting after this one you should ask Cub Scouts how their herb garden is doing.  After several weeks they should have good growth of their plants.  Ask for photos of plants so they can share with the other members of the den.
From Eggs to Planter
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Use recycled paper egg cartons to make a small herb garden.

You may substitute any seeds for the garden.  It is recommended to use seeds that germinate fast so Cub Scouts can see growth as soon as possible. Recommended herbs are dill, basil, chives, thyme, parsley, oregano, cilantro, and sage.

  • Recycled paper dozen egg cartons, one for every two Cub Scouts and every two adult partners
  • 1 packet of sweet basil seeds
  • 1 packet of cilantro seeds
  • 1 packet of dill seeds
  • 50 qt bag of potting soil
  • Scissors
  • Magic markers, enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with planting herb gardens to know the best way to plant and take care of the herbs by reading the directions on each packet of seeds. Check out the YouTube video, “Starting Seeds in Egg Cartons” for more information.
  2. Take each egg carton and cut it in half so there are two rows of three containers, six total containers.  Cub Scouts will plant three different herbs in two rows.
  3. Two days before the meeting you may need to start germinating the seeds, check the seed package.  To germinate, soak the seeds in water for several hours and then place them on a wet paper towel.   Place the seeds and the paper towel in a plastic zip-lock bag and keep them in a warm dark place.  After a day you should start to see seeds germinate with a sprout coming out.
  4. Prepare the meeting location so Cub Scouts and adult partners can complete the activity together.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partner and share with them that they will be making an herb garden.
  2. Demonstrate how to make the herb garden and plant the seeds.
  3. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scouts to plant their herb garden.  Use magic markers to mark the rows of what is planted there.
  4. Water the garden.
  5. Share how to take care of their herb garden based on the information on the seed packets.

After the meeting:

  1. Each meeting after this one you should ask Cub Scouts how their herb garden is doing.  After several weeks they should have good growth of their plants.  Ask for photos of plants so they can share with the other members of the den.
Sunflowers and Sunshine
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List3
Prep Time2

Decorate a small pot and plant sunflower seeds.

  • 1 packet of sunflower seeds for growing
  • 2.16″ small mini clay terracotta pots, one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • 25 qt. bag of potting soil
  • Craft paint brushes , enough to share
  • 16 oz bottle of blue acrylic paint
  • 16 oz bottle of yellow acrylic paint
  • 16 oz bottle of black acrylic paint
  • Jars of water to wash off paintbrushes
  • 1 roll of paper towels
  • Plastic table and floor covering
  • Water for watering the seeds.

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with planting sunflower seeds by reading the seed package. Watch this YouTube video, “How to Garden With Sunflower Seeds : Planting the Seed” for more information.
  2. Using acrylic paint, decorate one of the pots to use as an example.  Make a Cub Scout design with blue and gold.
  3. Set up the meeting location so Cub Scouts can work with their adult partners to complete the activity.  Make sure to cover table tops and floors to protect from paint spills.

During the meeting:

  1. Gather the Cub Scouts and adult partners and share with them that in this activity they will decorate a pot and then plant sunflower seeds.
  2. Have Cub Scouts work with their adult partners to paint their flowerpot.
  3. When they have painted their pot have them fill the pot with potting soil then lay three seeds 2 inches apart and then cover with about ½ inch of soil.  Have them water the seeds.
  4. Explain to them that in a couple of days, they should see the seed germinate and start to sprout.  It will take several weeks for the sunflower to grow.
  5. Remind them to water their sunflower every other day and keep it in a sunny location.

After the meeting:

  1. Each meeting after this one you should ask Cub Scouts how their herb garden is doing.  After several weeks they should have good growth of their plants.  Ask for photos of plants so they can share with the other members of the den.
Visit with an individual who can demonstrate different ways to garden (outside, greenhouse, container, etc.) and the basic skills needed to garden.
Lions Garden Like a Pro
LocationTravel
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time5

Plan to visit a nursery, garden, community garden, or botanical garden that will allow Cub Scouts to do some planting.

Activity Consent Form, one for each Cub Scout

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a nursery, garden, community garden, botanical garden or any other location with plants that will give an instructional lesson on gardening to the Cub Scouts and allow them to plant something.
  2. Contact the location and arrange a visit.  Inform the contact of the size of the den and that they are kindergarten-age youth with their adult partners.  Inform them that you would like them to share information about gardening and have them provide an opportunity for the Cub Scouts to plant something.  What they plant does not have to go home with them.
  3. Confirm the date and time of the visit and the contact person for the location.
  4. Before the visit, parents and legal guardians complete activity consent forms for each Cub Scout.
  5. Inform Cub Scouts, parents, legal guardians, and adult partners of the date, time, and location of the visit.  Have a designated gathering area.

During the meeting:

  1. Meet the Cub Scouts and adult partners in the designated gathering area.  Remind Cub Scouts that part of the Scout Law is to be friendly, courteous, and kind and to keep that in mind during their visit.
  2. Meet with the contact and go on the tour or start the program.
  3. Make sure that Cub Scouts get a chance to plant something.  What they plant does not have to go home with them.
  4. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they liked about the visit and to say one thing that they learned from the visit.

After the meeting:

  1. Send a thank you note to the contact.
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Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure.

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

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