Cub-a-Palooza Registration is now open. Click for details.

Tigers In The Wild

Required Adventure

Tigers and adult partners will take a walk to explore the outdoors.  Along the way, they can learn about domesticated and wild animals.

Requirements

Identify the Cub Scout Six Essentials. Show what you do with each item.
Grab the Six Essentials
LocationIndoor
Energy 5
Supply List5
Prep Time3

Relay race for Cub Scouts to identify the Cub Scout Six Essentials.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons – enough to share
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials (Recommend using small – youth-sized items)
    • Filled Water Bottle
    • Small first aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun Protection
    • Trail Mix
  • Miscellaneous Items (Recommend using small – youth-sized items. Make the items obvious that they are not part of the Cub Scout six essentials.) Suggested list, keep to six items:
    • Sponge
    • Duct Tape
    • Spoon
    • Toilet Paper
    • Washcloth
    • Tennis Ball
  • An open cardboard box to place the Cub Scout Six Essentials and miscellaneous items in

Before the meeting:

  1. Watch the four-minute video on the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  2. Take notes on the Cub Scout Six Essentials so you can explain the items to the den.
  3. Gather Cub Scout Six essentials and miscellaneous items.
  4. Place Cub Scout Six Essentials and miscellaneous items in an open cardboard box.
  5. Prepare the meeting space to create an area free of obstacles for the relay race.
  6. Place the box of items about 10 yards from a designated starting point.
  7. Prepare a place for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity on page 15 of the Tiger handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Explain how the relay race will work with the Cub Scouts and adult partners
  2. If you have a small den run the relay race as individuals. If you have a larger den, create teams.
  3. The first Cub Scout runs from the starting point to the box and picks an item they think is important to have when they are doing an outdoor activity and runs back to the starting point. The den leader stands at the starting point and tells the Cub Scout whether or not the item is part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials. If the item is one of the Cub Scout Six Essentials, the next Cub Scout in line runs to the box.If the item is not part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials, the Cub Scout runs back to the box with the item they picked, place it back in the box, and choose another item they think is part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  4. Repeat until all items that are part of the Cub Scout Six Essentials have been retrieved from the box.
  5. Gather the den together and pick up each of the Cub Scout Six Essentials one at a time and tell the den why that item is important.
  6. Have Cub Scouts, with help from their adult partners complete the activity on page 15 of the Tiger handbook.
Is It a Cub Scout Essential?
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List5
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts pick out the Cub Scout six essentials from mix of outdoor equipment.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons – enough to share
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials (Recommend using small – youth-sized items)
    • Filled Water Bottle
    • Small first aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun Protection
    • Trail Mix
  • Other Outdoor Equipment (Recommend using small – youth-sized items. Make the items obvious that they are not part of the Cub Scout six essentials.) Suggestions, keep to four items:
    • Umbrella
    • Book
    • Hammer
    • Phone
    • Large bath towel

Before the meeting:

  1. Watch the four-minute video on the Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  2. Take notes on the Cub Scout Six Essentials so you can explain the items to the den.
  3. Gather Cub Scout Six essentials and four other items.
  4. Place the Cub Scout Six Essentials and the four other items on a bath towel.
  5. Prepare a place for Cub Scouts and adult partners to complete the activity on page 15 of the Tiger handbook.

During the meeting:

  1. Ask the Cub Scouts and adult partners what items on the towel they think are important to have with you every time you do an outdoor activity.
  2. Once everyone has had a chance to share pick up each of the Cub Scout Six Essentials one at a time and tell the den why that item is important place the Cub Scout Six Essentials together and remove the other items from the towel.
  3. Have Cub Scouts, with help from their adult partners complete the activity on page 15 of the Tiger handbook.
Outdoor Code in a Flash
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Flash card activity to introduce Cub Scouts to the Outdoor Code.

  • Outdoor Code flash cards, one set for each Cub Scout found in Additional Resources
  • Printer

Before the meeting: 

  1. Print out and prepare outdoor code flash cards. 
  2. Become familiar with the Outdoor Code 
    • Be Clean in my outdoor manners 
      A Cub Scout takes care of the outdoors and keeps the outdoors clean. A Cub Scout knows that putting marks on buildings, trees, or natural objects causes permanent damage.
       
    • Be Careful with fire. 
      A Cub Scout may enjoy a campfire only with adult leaders. A Cub Scout knows not to play with matches and lighters. 
       
    • Be Considerate in the outdoors. 
      A Cub Scout shares our outdoor places and treats everything on the land and in the water with respect. 
       
    • Be Conservation-minded.  

During the meeting: 

  1. Give each adult partner a set of flash cards. 
  2. Have adult partners work with their Cub Scout to become familiar with the Outdoor Code using the flashcards.
With your den leader or Tiger adult partner, learn about the Outdoor Code.
Outdoor Code Puzzle
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List2
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts use their Tiger handbook to create an Outdoor Code puzzle.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Scissors one for each Cub Scout or enough to share
  • Crayons – enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to color and cut out the Outdoor Code puzzle in the Tiger handbook.

 

During the meeting:

  1. With help from their adult partner have the Cub Scouts color and then cut out the Outdoor Code puzzle on page 15 in the Tiger handbook.
  2. Review the Outdoor code as they are making their puzzle.
  3. There are four C’s in the outdoor code, review each one.
  4. Clean – Be Clean in my outdoor manners. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be clean in their outdoor manners. Then share the following:
    • Treat the outdoors as a heritage.
    • Take care of it for myself and others.
    • Keep trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.
  5. Careful – Be Careful with fire. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be careful with fire when in the outdoors. Then share the following:
    • Prevent wildfires.
    • Build fires only when and where they are permitted and appropriate.
    • When finished using a fire, make sure it is cold out.
    • Leave a clean fire ring or remove all evidence of my fire.
  6. Considerate – Be considerate in the outdoors. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be considerate in the outdoors. Then share the following:
    • Treat the land and other land users with respect.
    • Follow the principles of outdoor ethics for all outdoor activities.
  7. Conservation – Be conservation-minded. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what it means to be conservation minded. Then share the following:
    • Learn about and practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife, and energy.
    • Urge others to do the same.
The Four C’s of the Outdoor Code
LocationIndoor
Energy 1
Supply List1
Prep Time1

The four C’s is a method of introducing the Outdoor Code.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons – enough to share

Before the meeting:

  1. Set up the meeting space for Cub Scouts and adult partners to work in their Tiger handbook.

 

During the meeting:

  1. Have Cub Scouts open their Tiger handbook to page 13 to see the Outdoor Code.
  2. With help from their adult partner have the Cub Scouts circle all the letter Cs in the Outdoor Code. Don’t count the title, the C in “The Outdoor Code.”
  3. There are four C’s in the outdoor code, review each one.
  4. Clean – Be Clean in my outdoor manners. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be clean in their outdoor manners. Then share the following:
    • Treat the outdoors as a heritage.
    • Take care of it for myself and others.
    • Keep trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.
  5. Careful – Be Careful with fire. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be careful with fire when in the outdoors. Then share the following:
    • Prevent wildfires.
    • Build fires only when and where they are permitted and appropriate.
    • When finished using a fire, make sure it is cold out.
    • Leave a clean fire ring or remove all evidence of my fire.
  6. Considerate – Be considerate in the outdoors. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners how they can be considerate in the outdoors. Then share the following:
    • Treat the land and other land users with respect.
    • Follow the principles of outdoor ethics for all outdoor activities.
  7. Conservation – Be conservation-minded. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what it means to be conservation minded. Then share the following:
    • Learn about and practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife and energy.
    • Urge others to do the same.
With your den, pack, or family, take a walk outside spending for at least 20 minutes exploring the outdoors with your Cub Scout Six Essentials. While outside, identify things that you see with your Tiger adult partner that are natural and things that are manmade.
5 Step Seek
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Adult partners give a clue to something they see outside as Cub Scouts guess what it is and if it is natural or manmade.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Pencils – one for each Cub Scout
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials (Recommend using small – youth-sized items)
    • Filled Water Bottle
    • Small first aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun Protection
    • Trail Mix

This outdoor walk can be done in any environment, it may be in an urban, suburban, or rural area. It may be a local park or neighborhood. It may be outside of your normal meeting location.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify the area where you are going to take the walk. Ensure that the area is safe and identify any hazards to avoid.
  2. If the location is not your normal meeting place, give the address and directions to the families in your den.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners to bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials with them and to wear appropriate footwear.

During the meeting:

  1. Check to see if everyone has their Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  2. Tell everyone the route that will be followed for the walk.
  3. Share any hazards that may be on the path and how to avoid them.
  4. Inform the den that during the walk adult partners are to identify something and give a clue to their Cub Scout as to what it is. For example, I see something purple. The Cub Scout guesses that it could be a purple flower that is on the path. Next, the adult partner should ask is it natural or manmade.
  5. Adult partners and Cub Scouts explore the outdoor space identifying the things they see as natural or manmade.
  6. When the walk is over ask Cub Scouts to draw, in the Tiger handbook on page 17, one thing they saw that one natural and one thing that was manmade.
I Spy Natural or Manmade
LocationOutdoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

A game of I Spy that includes objects that are natural or manmade.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Pencils – one for each Cub Scout
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials (Recommend using small – youth-sized items)
    • Filled Water Bottle
    • Small first aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun Protection
    • Trail Mix

This outdoor walk can be done in any environment, it may be in an urban, suburban, or rural area. It may be a local park or neighborhood. It may be outside of your normal meeting location.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify the area where you are going to take the walk. Ensure that the area is safe and identify any hazards to avoid.
  2. If the location is not your normal meeting place, give the address and directions to the families in your den.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners to bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials with them and to wear appropriate footwear.

During the meeting:

  1. Check to see if everyone has their Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  2. Tell everyone the route that will be followed for the walk.
  3. Share any hazards that may be on the path and how to avoid them.
  4. Inform the den that during the walk you will play a game of I Spy. The den leader will start by finding and object and say “I spy something” followed by either natural or manmade followed by a one-word description. For example: “I spy something manmade that is black.” It could be a black car that is parked nearby. Cub Scouts guess what the object is. If no one can guess correctly another one-word clue is given until the object is identified. Whoever guesses the object now gets the turn to pick an object and have the den guess what it is.
  5. Be clear with the Cub Scouts that the object needs to be visible to everyone.
  6. When the walk is over ask Cub Scouts to draw, in the Tiger handbook on page 17, one thing they saw that one natural and one thing that was manmade.
Natural or Manmade by the Numbers
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Cub Scouts and adult partners work together to identify as many things they can that are natural and manmade.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Pencils – one for each Cub Scout
  • Blank piece of paper for each Cub Scout
  • Cub Scout Six Essentials (Recommend using small – youth-sized items)
    • Filled Water Bottle
    • Small first aid kit
    • Whistle
    • Flashlight
    • Sun Protection
    • Trail Mix

This outdoor walk can be done in any environment, it may be in an urban, suburban, or rural area. It may be a local park or neighborhood. It may be outside of your normal meeting location.

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify the area where you are going to take the walk. Ensure that the area is safe and identify any hazards to avoid.
  2. If the location is not your normal meeting place, give the address and directions to the families in your den.
  3. Remind Cub Scouts and adult partners to bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials with them and to wear appropriate footwear.

During the meeting:

  1. Check to see if everyone has their Cub Scout Six Essentials.
  2. Tell everyone the route that will be followed for the walk.
  3. Share any hazards that may be on the path and how to avoid them.
  4. Distribute a pencil and sheet of paper to each adult partner.
  5. Inform the den that during the walk Cub Scouts should name as many things as they see to their adult partner and identify it as natural or manmade. The adult partner then writes down the item on the sheet of paper and puts an N next to it if it is natural or an M if it is manmade.
  6. Adult partners and Cub Scouts explore the outdoor space identifying the things they see as natural or manmade.
  7. When the walk is over ask Cub Scouts to draw, in the Tiger handbook on page 17, one thing they saw that one natural and one thing that was manmade.
Identify common animals that are found where you live. Learn which of those animals is domesticated and which animal is wild. Draw a picture of your favorite animal.
My Favorite Animals
LocationIndoor
Energy 2
Supply List1
Prep Time1

Cub Scouts draw their favorite domesticated and wild animal.

  • Blank drawing paper – two sheets per Cub Scout
  • Pencils – enough to share
  • Crayons – enough to share
  • Photos of domesticated animals
  • Photos of wild animals

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting space for Cub Scouts to draw animals.
  2. Gather photos or images of domesticated and wild animals.

During the meeting:

  1. Discuss the difference between wild and domesticated animals. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they think makes an animal wild and to give examples of wild animals.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they think makes an animal domesticated and to give examples of domesticated animals.
  3. Wild animals are animals that live outdoors and do not rely on humans and are considered wild animals. Most wild animals avoid humans, so you may not see them. Wild animals usually have better sight, hearing, and smell than humans, which helps them stay out of our sight. You should observe wild animals but never approach them.
  4. Domesticated animals are animals that live with humans and rely on us for things like food and shelter are called domesticated. Some animals have become domesticated as a source of food or to help humans with work, and others have become pets. Just because an animal is domesticated does not mean the animal is safe.
  5. Never approach an animal that you do not know. You cannot tell whether an animal is domesticated or wild just by looking at it. For example, most dogs you may see are domesticated, but some dogs are wild and do not rely on humans. Wild dogs should not be approached.
  6. Have Cub Scouts draw their favorite wild animal on one sheet of paper and their favorite domesticated animal on another sheet of paper.
Stuffed Animal Relay Race
LocationIndoor
Energy 4
Supply List3
Prep Time3

Using stuffed animals Cub Scouts identify if the animal is wild or domesticated.

  • 8 stuffed animals that are wild animals
  • 8 stuffed animals that are domesticated animals
  • Two baskets – large enough to fit half of the stuffed animals in

Before the meeting:

  1. Prepare the meeting location for a relay race removing obstacles or tripping hazards.
  2. Place four stuffed wild animals and four domesticated stuffed animals in each basket.

During the meeting:

  1. Discuss the difference between wild and domesticated animals. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they think makes an animal wild and to give examples of wild animals.
  2. Ask Cub Scouts and adult partners what they think makes an animal domesticated and to give examples of domesticated animals.
  3. Wild animals are animals that live outdoors and do not rely on humans and are considered wild animals. Most wild animals avoid humans, so you may not see them. Wild animals usually have better sight, hearing, and smell than humans, which helps them stay out of our sight. You should observe wild animals but never approach them.
  4. Domesticated animals are animals that live with humans and rely on us for things like food and shelter are called domesticated. Some animals have become domesticated as a source of food or to help humans with work, and others have become pets. Just because an animal is domesticated does not mean the animal is safe.
  5. Never approach an animal that you do not know. You cannot tell if an animal is domesticated or wild just by looking at it. For example, most dogs you may see are domesticated, but some dogs are wild and do not rely on humans. Wild dogs should not be approached.
  6. Divide the den into two teams, including adult partners.
  7. In this relay race the den leader will call out either “wild” or “domesticated” and the first person on each team runs to their assigned basket and picks a stuffed animal that matches what was called then runs back to the line. If the animal they picked was not correct they go again. If the animal they picked was correct they go to the back of their team and sit down. The winning team is the one who has all its team members sitting first.
  8. After each turn, the animals that were picked up are replaced in the basket. A team may not pick the same animal more than two times.
Look for a tree where you live. Describe how this tree is helpful.
Leaf and Bark Rubbing
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List2
Prep Time2

Make a leaf and bark rubbing of a tree.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Blank drawing paper – two sheets per Cub Scout and two sheets per adult partner
  • Crayons – enough for one per Cub Scout and one per adult partner
  • Tree leaves
  • Tree bark

Before the meeting:

  1. Identify a tree where you will be meeting. If there are no trees where you are meeting, find leaves and tree bark that you can bring to the meeting.
  2. Become familiar with trees in your area by visiting the Arbor Day Foundation website “What Tree Is That?
  3. Set up the meeting space so Cub Scouts and adult partners can make rubbings.

During the meeting:

  1. Have the Cub Scouts open their Tiger handbook to page 18.
  2. Tell the den that trees are very helpful and important. Ask a Cub Scout to identify one of the pictures on page 18 that demonstrates how the tree is helpful. The correct answers are:
    • The bird nest – Trees provide shelter for birds, squirrels, and other animals.
    • Tiger breathing- Trees help clean the air.
    • The apple – Some trees have fruit that we or animals can eat, like an apple.
    • Sitting in the shade – Trees can provide shade for us and keep us cool on a sunny day.
  3. As Cub Scouts identify the way a tree can be helpful have them draw the line from the box to the tree. Have them color the tree.
  4. Give each Cub Scout and adult partner a leaf to do a leaf rubbing. Tell them what type of tree the leaf is from.
  5. Give each Cub Scout and adult partner a piece of bark to do a rubbing or if the tree is close have them go outside and do the rubbing. Tell them what type of tree the bark is from.
Pinecone Bird Feeder
LocationOutdoor
Energy 3
Supply List4
Prep Time3

Make a pinecone bird feeder and place it in a tree.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons – enough to share
  • Large Open Pinecones – one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Jar of Peanut butter
  • Plastic knives – one for each Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Birdseed
  • Bowl
  • Twine cut into 10-inch pieces – one for each Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with trees in your area by visiting The Arbor Day Foundation website.
  2. Set up the meeting space so Cub Scouts and adult partners can make pinecone bird feeders.
  3. Check to see if anyone has peanut allergies. Find an alternative to peanut butter such as SunButter, made from sunflower seeds.

During the meeting:

  1. Have the Cub Scouts open their Tiger handbook to page 18.
  2. Tell the den that trees are very helpful and important. Ask a Cub Scout to identify one of the pictures on page 18 that demonstrates how the tree is helpful. The correct answers are:
    • The bird nest – Trees provide shelter for birds, squirrels, and other animals.
    • Tiger breathing- Trees help clean the air.
    • The apple – Some trees have fruit that we or animals can eat, like an apple.
    • Sitting in the shade – Trees can provide shade for us and keep us cool on a sunny day.
  3. As Cub Scouts identify the way a tree can be helpful have them draw the line from the box to the tree. Have them color the tree.
  4. Bring out the supplies for making the pinecone bird feeders.
  5. Pour the birdseed into the bowl.
  6. Using the twine and tie it to the top of the pinecone. Have adult partners help Cub Scouts.
  7. Use the plastic knife to spread the peanut butter onto the pinecone.
  8. Roll the pinecone into the bowl of bird seed and press the seed into the peanut butter.
  9. Cover the pinecone completely with birdseed.
  10. Find a tree to hang the bird feeder.
Tiger Tree Planting
LocationOutdoor with Travel
Energy 4
Supply List4
Prep Time5

Plant a tree.

  • Tiger handbook for each Cub Scout
  • Crayons – enough to share
  • Tree seedlings to be planted – one per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Small shovels – one per Cub Scout and adult partner
  • Work gloves – one pair per Cub Scout and adult partner

Before the meeting:

  1. Become familiar with tree planting in your area by visiting The Arbor Day Foundation website.
  2. Identify an area where trees can be planted and get permission to do so.
    • Local Scout camp or service center
    • A local park or city building
    • School
    • Chartered partner
  3. Secure tree seedlings. Bulk seedings are available for purchase through the Arbor Day Foundation,
  4. Once the location is secure provide address and directions to the adult partners in the den.
  5. Remind everyone to bring clothes that can get dirty and appropriate footwear.
  6. Remind everyone to bring their Cub Scout Six Essentials and work gloves.

During the meeting:

  1. Have the Cub Scouts open their Tiger handbook to page 18.
  2. Tell the den that trees are very helpful and important. Ask a Cub Scout to identify one of the pictures on page 18 that demonstrates how the tree is helpful. The correct answers are:
    • The bird nest – Trees provide shelter for birds, squirrels, and other animals.
    • Tiger breathing- Trees help clean the air.
    • The apple – Some trees have fruit that we or animals can eat, like an apple.
    • Sitting in the shade – Trees can provide shade for us and keep us cool on a sunny day.
  3. As Cub Scouts identify the way a tree can be helpful have them draw the line from the box to the tree. Have them color the tree.
  4. Gather the den and demonstrate the proper way to plant the seedling; this will be based on the type of seedling you have.
  5. Show Cub Scouts and adult partners where they can plan the seedlings.
  6. Plant the trees.
  7. Clean up.
Print

Safety Moment

Prior to any activity, use the BSA SAFE Checklist to ensure the safety of all those involved.  

All participants in official BSA Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scoutingand applicable program literature or manuals.   

Be aware of state or local government regulations that supersede BSA practices, policies, and guidelines.  

To assist in the safe delivery of the program you may find specific safety items that are related to requirements for the Adventure. 

Before conducting a craft activity, review the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.) 

Before starting this Adventure complete the following:  

If there is someone in the den, youth, or adults, who carries an EpiPen due to severe allergies make sure that at least one other adult knows how to administer the EpiPen. To learn more, review this Safety Moment on anaphylaxis. During the Adventure: 

  • Use the buddy system. 
  • All adults are to provide active supervision.

Join our email list

Get the latest news and information from the Pack.

This website is independently operated and is not sponsored by, endorsed by, or affiliated with the Boy Scouts of America. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author alone and in no way represent the views of the Boy Scouts of America. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA®, the BSA Universal Emblem, the Venturing diamond logo, and all other related marks are trademarks owned exclusively by the Boy Scouts of America.  Website designed and maintained by Jake Parrott